Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Dimension X
Show: Requiem
Date: Sep 22 1951

CAST:
HOST
DEL HARRIMAN
McINTYRE, captain
HENRY
CHARLIE, engineer
DOCTOR
YOUNG DEL
MOTHER
CHARLOTTE, wife
FRED, partner
KAMENS, lawyer
MARSHAL
ANNOUNCER
and a fairground CROWD


NOTE: Another version of this play aired on X Minus One, Oct 27 1955. This transcript includes some material from the '55 broadcast in brackets.

MUSIC:

OMINOUS RUMBLE

HOST:

Adventures in Time and Space, transcribed in Future Tense.

MUSIC:

OMINOUS RUMBLE CLIMAXES WITH CYMBAL CRASH

HOST:

(HEAVY ECHO) DIMENSION X-x-x-x-x- (TRAILS OFF)

MUSIC:

OMINOUS FUTURISTIC PERCUSSION ... THEN IN BG

HOST:

The National Broadcasting Company, in cooperation with Street and Smith, publishers of Astounding Science Fiction, brings you -- DIMENSION X.

MUSIC:

WEIRD ACCENT ... THEN IN BG

HOST:

On a high hill in Samoa there is a grave. Inscribed on the marker are these words--

Under the wide and starry sky
Dig my grave and let me lie
Gladly did I live and gladly die
And I lay me down with a will.

This be the verse you grave for me:
"Here he lies where he longed to be,
Home is the sailor, home from the sea,
And the hunter home from the hill."

These lines appear another place -- scrawled on a shipping tag from a compressed-air container, and pinned to the ground with a knife.

MUSIC:

UP, FOR AN ACCENT ... THEN OUT

SOUND:

WALLA OF FAIRGROUND CROWD, IN BG

ANNOUNCER: It wasn't much of a fair, as fairs go. The trotting races wouldn't be held till eight o'clock at night. The flags and bunting drooped in the gray afternoon and the pitchmen seemed discouraged. A large black cabriolet limousine stood at the side of the road, thirty-two cylinders purring quietly. And over the dust and the clatter of the fair, a bullhorn blasted its highest pitch--

McINTYRE:

(OVER BULLHORN) Hurry, hurry, hurry! This way to the moon rocket -- THE MOON ROCKET! See it fly! The actual type rocket used by the first men to fly it! Chills, thrills, the romance of space! You can ride in it for only twenty-five dollars! Hurry, hurry, hurry!

HARRIMAN:

Henry?

HENRY:

Yes, sir?

HARRIMAN:

I'm getting out.

HENRY:

But the board meeting, sir-- You're due in Kansas City at four.

HARRIMAN:

You think I need another five-dollar gold piece?

HENRY:

Oh, no, sir.

HARRIMAN:

You trying to tell me what to do?

HENRY:

No, sir. Of course not, sir.

HARRIMAN:

Then get this confounded buffalo robe off my legs.

HENRY:

Yes, sir.

SOUND:

STRUGGLES TO RISE DURING FOLLOWING--

HARRIMAN:

Get it off!

HENRY:

Just a minute, sir, I'll help you.

HARRIMAN:

Let go of me.

HENRY:

Of course, sir.

HARRIMAN:

(GRUNTS)

HENRY:

Watch your head on the door, sir.

HARRIMAN:

Let go of me!

CHAUFFEUR:

I'm sorry, sir.

SOUND:

LIMOUSINE DOOR SHUTS

HARRIMAN:

(THOUGHTFUL) There. That's the ship. Rotten old tub. Single-jet type with fractional midriff controls. (FIRM) Stay here, Henry! I'm going over!

MUSIC:

BRIEF BRIDGE

SOUND:

WALLA OF FAIRGROUND CROWD, IN BG

McINTYRE:

(OVER BULLHORN) The moon rocket! Fifty cents to come aboard! Flight leaving in thirty minutes! Hurry, hurry, hurry!

SOUND:

CLICK! OF SWITCH AS BULLHORN TURNED OFF

McINTYRE:

Hey, Charlie? Have you got that feed tube patched?

CHARLIE:

I welded it. Good for maybe an hour.

McINTYRE:

Oh, what a crowd. They wouldn't risk a nickel to see the sun blow up.

HARRIMAN:

Oh, captain? Oh, excuse me, captain.

McINTYRE:

Yeah? Oh, yes, sir. Fifty cents to inspect the rocket. One?

HARRIMAN:

Could you take a passenger this trip?

McINTYRE:

You mean you want to go up? It's twenty-five bucks.

HARRIMAN:

That's right.

McINTYRE:

Yes, sir, right away. Charlie, uh, take the pitch.

CHARLIE:

Oh, okay.

McINTYRE:

Step this way, sir. Look out - look out for the feed lines there.

HARRIMAN:

Yes, I see them.

McINTYRE:

Step right into the office.

SOUND:

OFFICE DOOR OPENS

McINTYRE:

Hey, doc? Passenger for a check-up.

DOCTOR:

Okay, Mac.

SOUND:

OFFICE DOOR SHUTS ... CUTS OFF CROWD

HARRIMAN:

(RELUCTANT) Is this necessary?

McINTYRE:

Regulations.

DOCTOR:

Uh, take off your coat, open your shirt, roll up your right sleeve. How are things, Mac?

McINTYRE:

Slow. We're not drawing as much as the cooch tent.

DOCTOR:

Ah, it'll pick up tonight with the trotters.

HARRIMAN:

Well, I'm ready, doctor.

DOCTOR:

All right, gimme your arm.

SOUND:

BLOOD PRESSURE CUFF

HARRIMAN:

(BREATHES IN AND OUT IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--)

DOCTOR:

All right, breathe in. Out. Breathe. Breathe. Breathe. Uh uh. Sorry, Mac.

McINTYRE:

No go, doc?

DOCTOR:

Cardiac condition. I couldn't certify him. Sorry.

HARRIMAN:

You mean you won't take me up?

McINTYRE:

He's the doctor.

DOCTOR:

I couldn't even guarantee you'd live through the take-off. It's not only your bad heart, but, with heavy acceleration, your whole circulatory system would be in danger. And, at your age, bones are brittle -- highly calcified. You can snap one on the take-off. Eh, tough.

SOUND:

CROWD WALLA RETURNS AS OFFICE DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS BEHIND--

HARRIMAN:

Well, I rather expected it.

McINTYRE:

I'm sorry. Between you and me, we could have used the twenty-five.

HARRIMAN:

Oh, uh, excuse me, Captain--?

McINTYRE:

Yeah?

HARRIMAN:

Could you and your engineer have dinner with me after your flight?

McINTYRE:

Dinner?

HARRIMAN:

At my home. Uh, my car is over there.

McINTYRE:

(IMPRESSED) That's your car?

HARRIMAN:

Yes.

McINTYRE:

You're serious, mac? You want Charlie and me for dinner?

HARRIMAN:

Why, yes.

McINTYRE:

Okay. Okay. I don't see why not. Thanks.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

DINNER BACKGROUND ... UTENSILS, ET CETERA ... BRANDY POURED INTO GLASS

McINTYRE:

Charlie? Charlie, you've had enough.

CHARLIE:

(ALREADY DRUNK) Aw, lay off, Mac.

HARRIMAN:

Oh, that's perfectly all right, Captain McIntyre. Uh, cigar?

McINTYRE:

Thanks. (BEAT, IMPRESSED BY CIGAR) Mmmmm.

HARRIMAN:

Light?

McINTYRE:

Yes, thanks.

SOUND:

LIGHTS CIGAR

HARRIMAN:

You know, it's hard for me to see why any holder of a Master's Ticket would quit the Earth-Moon run.

McINTYRE:

(UNCONVINCING) I didn't like it.

CHARLIE:

(LAUGHS) Yeah, yeah, don't hand us that. It was Rule G washed you out.

McINTYRE:

All right, all right, so I took a few drinks. I could have squared that. Too many regulations, red tape.

CHARLIE:

Yeah.

HARRIMAN:

[Tell me, gentlemen, are you satisfied with what you're doing now?

McINTYRE:

Are you kidding? We've been pushing the old junk heap for a year. Half the time the sheriff has an attachment on the ship for a fuel bill. It stinks.]

HARRIMAN:

Would it help you to get back to the Moon?

McINTYRE:

Well, sure. I could get a short-haul job hopping ore. If I kept my nose clean, I might even get back on the run.

HARRIMAN:

Captain, would you be open to a business proposition?

McINTYRE:

What is it?

HARRIMAN:

Do you own your rocket?

McINTYRE:

Barring a couple of liens against it.

HARRIMAN:

I want to charter her -- to take me to the Moon.

McINTYRE:

What?!

CHARLIE:

Did you hear what he said, Mac? He wants us to fly that old heap to the Moon! (LAUGHS)

McINTYRE:

Oh, no. Can't do it. The old boat's worn out. We don't even use standard fuel, just gasoline and liquid air.

CHARLIE:

[Why don't you charter a regular Company ship?

HARRIMAN:

Oh, no, no, I can't do that. The Company charter comes up before a Congressional committee this year. They have to follow the regulations.

McINTYRE:

You can't pass the physical? Now, if you can afford to hire us,] why don't you bribe a couple of Company medics? It's been done before.

HARRIMAN:

I know. But not for me. I'm D. D. Harriman.

CHARLIE:

(STUNNED) Harriman?

McINTYRE:

Why, you own the Company. [Hey, what are you giving us?]

HARRIMAN:

I own a large percentage of the Company but the other directors won't permit me to jeopardize the franchise.

CHARLIE:

Ha! Can you tie that, Mac? A guy with half the money in the world, and he's up the creek! (LAUGHS)

McINTYRE:

Shut up, Charlie.

HARRIMAN:

He's right. (BEAT) Well, captain?

McINTYRE:

It's against the law.

HARRIMAN:

I'd make it worth your while.

CHARLIE:

Sure he would, Mac. D. D. Harriman! He'd make it worth our while.

McINTYRE:

Why do you want to go to the Moon so bad, Mr. Harriman?

HARRIMAN:

It's the one thing I've really wanted to do all my life. I may be fifty years older than you are. When I was a kid, nobody believed we'd really reach the Moon. You've seen rockets all your lives. But, when I was a boy, they laughed at the idea. But I believed! I wanted the Moon then. I used to stand in the back yard and stare at it.

MUSIC:

NOSTALGIC, FOR A FLASHBACK ... THEN IN BG

YOUNG DEL:

How far away is it, mom?

MOTHER:

(AMUSED) The Moon? Far enough.

YOUNG DEL:

Why don't people fly to the Moon?

MOTHER:

They can't.

YOUNG DEL:

Why not?

MOTHER:

They just can't. Not now, anyway.

YOUNG DEL:

Someday, I will.

MOTHER:

What?

YOUNG DEL:

Fly to the Moon.

MOTHER:

(HUMORS HIM) Sure, sure. Come on now, Del. Inside. It's way past your bedtime.

MUSIC:

FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG

HARRIMAN:

(NARRATES) I wanted to go to college -- engineering. Then the University of Chicago. Then Yerkes Observatory. That's what I wanted. But I didn't get it.

MOTHER:

(WEARY) You see, Del, dad and I wanted you to go to college. We planned it, we saved for it. But with your dad gone and the girls growing up, I just can't manage it. The insurance won't cover us and it's getting harder to make ends meet. You've been a good boy, Del, and worked hard to make out. You'll understand.

MUSIC:

FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG

HARRIMAN:

(NARRATES) I understood, and I worked. Stock boy at the old Ford plant in Detroit. Accountant, credit manager for a mail order house. Then New York -- Wall Street. And then transportation. The monorail line between New York and Chicago, the Atlantic Pressure Tunnel. And then Harriman Rockets.

CHARLOTTE:

Del? Del, I want to talk to you.

HARRIMAN:

I'm working, Charlotte.

CHARLOTTE:

You'll talk to me now, Del, or you may not get another chance.

HARRIMAN:

What is it?

CHARLOTTE:

Fred Lott was in. You've sold out again?

HARRIMAN:

I run the business, Charlotte.

CHARLOTTE:

Del, I'm fed up with it. Up to here! I married you because I love you. I still love you -- but I'm fed up!

HARRIMAN:

Now, what is it, Charlotte?

CHARLOTTE:

We're not young any more, Del. [Fred tells me you've bought into a bankrupt engineering firm. Sunk every nickel in it.

HARRIMAN:

Well, they own the Schwartz-Miller fuel injector patents. I need them.

CHARLOTTE:

How many times do we have to start over?] I'm tired. I'm not asking for millions. Just a little life for the two of us.

HARRIMAN:

I'll pull the money out.

CHARLOTTE:

Yes. I know you will. Twenty hours a day on benzedrene to stay awake and neobarbital to sleep. Oh, Del, I can't stop you from doing this to yourself but I won't let you do it to me!

MUSIC:

FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG

HARRIMAN:

(NARRATES) I didn't know about the divorce for a month. I lost the papers under a stack of blueprints and stock prospectus.

FRED:

Here's the news flash, Del. "Strato-rocket reaches Paris." We've got the franchise lined up. The House committee is solid, the Federal Rocket Commission is okay--

HARRIMAN:

The next step is the Moon, Fred.

FRED:

(HUMORS HIM) Sure, sure. Look, Del, if we cut the freight trade on the tunnel, we could--

HARRIMAN:

I'm serious, Fred. The next step is the Moon

FRED:

Del, you've been riding that joke for years.

HARRIMAN:

It's no joke, Fred. I've signed a four-million dollar research contract with National Fission Corporation and guaranteed the next two years' output of the Brookhaven Atomic Energy Institute.

FRED:

Del, you couldn't! That's every liquid asset we have. You can't do that on your own initiative.

HARRIMAN:

I have, and the board will back me up. Fred, we're going to the Moon!

MUSIC:

FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG

HARRIMAN:

[That night, I walked through the park, watching the full moon move across the sky. My old friend. I could recognize the wrinkles. Crisium, Mare Fecunditatis, Mare Tranquillitatis, the Lunar Apennines.] It took two fraudulent bankruptcies and an investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission before we did it. [The Moon!] There were three injunctions on the rocket before it blasted off. I was going on the second trip but my considerate board served a court order on me.

FRED:

You can't go, Del.

HARRIMAN:

Fred, I'll break you if it's the last thing--

FRED:

Del, you've got a bad heart, and that's no secret. If you die out there, the whole card house comes down. We've got an equity in this corporation and we're going to see it protected. You've sucked us in on this wild scheme and, now that it paid off, you're going to sit right down here on Earth and see that the dividends come out on time. You're not going to the Moon, Del! Forget it.

MUSIC:

FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

HARRIMAN:

(NARRATES) I never went. By the time my lawyers shook off the restraining orders, the first cargo rocket had crashed into the Pacific and Congress rushed through the Space Precautionary Act -- my heart was [kept] earthbound. But now I'm old. [I've lived longer than I should, but I would not let myself die -- I will not -- until I have set foot on the Moon.] (FIRMLY) But I will not die until I have set foot on the Moon. [X] (BEAT) There, Captain McIntyre. You ask why I want to go to the Moon? Well.

McINTYRE:

You find a ship, Mr. Harriman, [and] I'll drive her. You'll get to the Moon.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

HENRY:

But, Mr. Harriman--!

HARRIMAN:

You heard me. Sell out my holdings. I want every share I own realized in cash as soon as possible.

HENRY:

But it'll depress the market, sir. You won't realize the full value of your holdings.

HARRIMAN:

Don't you think I know that? I was juggling stock before you were born. I can afford to take the loss.

HENRY:

Yes, sir. Oh, uh, Mr. Harriman, there are two men outside.

HARRIMAN:

Who are they?

HENRY:

A Captain McIntyre and a Mr. Schwartz.

HARRIMAN:

Well, send them in, Henry. What are you waiting for?!

HENRY:

(MOVING OFF) Yes, sir, of course; immediately, sir.

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS, OFF

HENRY:

(OFF) Uh, this way, gentlemen.

McINTYRE:

(APPROACHES) Mr. Harriman?

SOUND:

DOOR SHUTS, OFF, BEHIND--

HARRIMAN:

(CHUCKLES, PLEASED) Well, Captain McIntyre. I'm glad to see you. And Mr. Schwartz. Come right in.

McINTYRE:

You weren't kidding about that job for us, were you?

HARRIMAN:

Certainly not. You're not backing out on me, are you?

McINTYRE:

No, no. We, uh-- We need the job.

CHARLIE:

Yeah. Our ship is lying in the middle of the Osage River, where it just split open like a herring.

HARRIMAN:

You weren't hurt, were you?

McINTYRE:

Sprains and bruises, that's all. We jumped.

CHARLIE:

I caught a catfish with my bare teeth.

HARRIMAN:

(AMUSED) That's all right. Then we can get down to business. I'll have contracts drawn up for you. You two will have to buy me a ship. I can't do it openly -- my dear board of directors will find out and slap a court order on me.

McINTYRE:

But, uh, we can't get credit.

HARRIMAN:

Don't worry, I'll supply the cash in advance. Pick some ship that can be fitted for the jump. A strato yacht, [hm? Apply for a strato license. Then, after it's issued, you] move to a piece of desert. I'll find a strip and buy it.

CHARLIE:

You mean, fit her out there?

HARRIMAN:

Yes. We'll install extra fuel tanks, change the injectors and timers for space flight.

McINTYRE:

[Charlie, do you think you can manage the change-over without a dock yard and shops?

CHARLIE:

Well, I'll have to have a load of power tools -- and a lot of time. It'll be haywired and spot-welded.

McINTYRE:

Just so it doesn't blow up when I slap the keys.

CHARLIE:

It won't blow.

McINTYRE:

Well, that's what you said about the last ship.

CHARLIE:

Now, cut it out, will ya? I ask ya, Mr. Harriman, that last ship was a junk heap and we knew it. Now, this one, this'll be different. We're gonna spend some dough and do it right. Ain't we, Mr. Harriman?]

HARRIMAN:

Spend all the money you want. I'll see that you get it.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

HENRY:

One hundred thirty-two shares of Apex Holding at sixty percent of par.

HARRIMAN:

Check.

HENRY:

Fifty-two preferred of Spaceways Fuel, fifty percent of par.

HARRIMAN:

Check.

HENRY:

And-- And that is the list. Uh, Mr. Harriman, there's a process server outside.

HARRIMAN:

What is it?

HENRY:

I don't know, sir, but - I think it's a subpoena.

HARRIMAN:

I was expecting that. Henry, get Mr. Kamens on the phone.

HENRY:

Yes, sir.

HARRIMAN:

I think it's time for my lawyer.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

COURTROOM CROWD WALLA ... SUBSIDES WITH GAVEL BANGS, BEHIND--

KAMENS:

May it please your honor. Counsel representing Mr. Harriman's relatives contend that his behavior for the past few weeks gives clear indication that a mind, brilliant in the world of finance, has become senile. They petition you to declare him incompetent and to assign a conservator to protect his financial interests -- and those of his heirs. May I suggest that in his last few words my opponent gave away his entire thesis? It is evident that the petitioners believe that my client should conduct his affairs in such a way as to ensure that his nephews, nieces and their issue will be supported in unearned luxury [for] the rest of their lives. Like vultures, they descend on him. Now, while it is true that he has sold his holdings, is it strange that an elderly man should wish to retire? We pray this court will confirm my client in his right to do what he likes with his own. Deny this petition -- and send these meddlers about their business!

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

HARRIMAN:

Well, Kamens?

KAMENS:

He reserved judgment till tomorrow.

HARRIMAN:

Which way is the cat going to jump?

KAMENS:

Well, Judge Embry is a strange one, Del. He assured me he has a high regard for personal liberty and then added that any action he took would be in your interest. But he did say that men do become senile and must be protected. [It could go either way.]

HARRIMAN:

Senile? He might rule against me.

KAMENS:

Yes, Del. He might. [We'll know tomorrow.]

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

AUTO ENGINE, THEN IN BG ... RATTLE OF NEWSPAPER

CHARLIE:

Here it is. (READS HEADLINE) "Eccentric Millionaire Disappears." (CHUCKLES) Are you eccentric, Mr. Harriman?

HARRIMAN:

(LIGHTLY) Well, they used to call me crazy, but it depends on your credit rating.

CHARLIE:

(READS) "A bench warrant under contempt proceedings has been issued."

HARRIMAN:

They won't find me out here. (SERIOUS) How's the work going, Charlie?

CHARLIE:

Well, my end's in pretty good shape. We finished the second pressure test on the new tanks and fuel lines today. The ground tests are all done, except the calibrations. Take about four hours, unless I run into bugs.

HARRIMAN:

How about supplies?

McINTYRE:

Food and water on board. Three vacuum suits, a spare, and service kits. I'm short navigation equipment, but give me a sextant and I'll get you down on the Moon at any spot you name, just from a general knowledge of relative speeds in orbit.

CHARLIE:

All right, Columbus, we know you can hit the floor with your hat.

HARRIMAN:

Are you ready to go? My nephews will have detectives out looking for me.

CHARLIE:

Well, I could run those calibration tests tonight. Take till midnight. After that, it's up to the commodore here.

McINTYRE:

There. There she is, Mr. Harriman. That's the job that'll take you to the Moon.

HARRIMAN:

(APPROVING) It's a good ship. I-- (GASPS, FAINTS)

CHARLIE:

Hey, Mac, stop the car!

SOUND:

CAR SLOWS TO A STOP BEHIND--

McINTYRE:

Charlie, he's out.

CHARLIE:

Look at him. Where's his medicine?

McINTYRE:

Vest pocket. Break the glass.

SOUND:

GLASS BREAKS

McINTYRE:

All right, hold it under his nose.

CHARLIE:

He looks lousy.

McINTYRE:

There. He's breathing easy. He'll come around soon.

CHARLIE:

Mac -- we ain't goin' through with this.

McINTYRE:

Why not?

CHARLIE:

It's murder. He'll never stand up under the initial acceleration.

McINTYRE:

Maybe not, but it's what he wants to do. [You heard him.

CHARLIE:

I don't like it. He's an okay old buzzard.

McINTYRE:

What do you want to do with him? Send him back to Kansas City so his no-good nephews can shut him up in the cellar?

CHARLIE:

No, but--

McINTYRE:

Okay, then. Now, get out there, and make your set-up for those test runs.] Get that ship ready to fly!

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

BUZZ OF EQUIPMENT ... THEN OUT DURING FOLLOWING--

MARSHAL:

(CALLS, FROM OFF) Hey! Hey, you! You!

CHARLIE:

Me?

MARSHAL:

(OFF) Yeah.

SOUND:

MARSHAL'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

MARSHAL:

How many other people are there out here on this desert?

CHARLIE:

What can I do for ya?

MARSHAL:

You James McIntyre?

CHARLIE:

(CALLS) Hey, Mac?!

McINTYRE:

(OFF) Yeah?

SOUND:

McINTYRE'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

McINTYRE:

What's the matter, Charlie? (SEES MARSHAL) Oh.

MARSHAL:

You McIntyre?

McINTYRE:

Yeah.

MARSHAL:

I'm the deputy federal marshal in this district. I got a warrant for your arrest.

McINTYRE:

What charge?

MARSHAL:

Conspiracy to violate the Space Precautionary Act. (TO CHARLIE) And you, uh-- You, I suppose you're Charles Schwartz, huh?

CHARLIE:

Yeah.

MARSHAL:

Well, I got one for you, too.

CHARLIE:

Thanks.

MARSHAL:

And a man named Harriman. Got a court order to put seals on your space ship.

McINTYRE:

We haven't got any space ship.

MARSHAL:

What are you doin', kiddin' me? What's that? A kiddie car?

McINTYRE:

Strato yacht.

MARSHAL:

Oh, yeah? Well, I'll put seals on it till a space ship shows up. Now, come on. Where's Harriman?

CHARLIE:

Uh, in the shed. Over there.

MARSHAL:

What shed are you--?

SOUND:

CHARLIE PUNCHES MARSHAL

MARSHAL:

(GASPS)

SOUND:

MARSHAL FALLS TO GROUND UNCONSCIOUS

CHARLIE:

Oh, my knuckle. That's the one I broke playing football. I'm always hurtin' that finger.

McINTYRE:

Charlie, we gotta hurry. Get Pop into the cabin and strap him into his hammock.

CHARLIE:

Right. (TO MARSHAL) So long, deputy. (TO HIMSELF) Oh, my knuckle.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

SHIP'S ENGINES PURR ... THEN IN BG

McINTYRE:

She's warm, Charlie. Everything set back there?

CHARLIE:

(FILTER) How do I know? I didn't have time to run tests.

McINTYRE:

Tough. You all right, Mr. Harriman?

HARRIMAN:

I think so, but these straps are tight.

McINTYRE:

Have to be when we blast off. All set, Charlie. Give me control.

CHARLIE:

(FILTER) Check. Test keys.

McINTYRE:

One bank.

CHARLIE:

(FILTER) Check.

McINTYRE:

Two bank.

CHARLIE:

(FILTER) There's an auxiliary out.

McINTYRE:

We don't need it. All right, boy, hang on. Let's go.

SOUND:

SHIP BLASTS OFF ... ENGINES LEVEL OFF, CONTINUE IN BG

McINTYRE:

How are you, Pop?

HARRIMAN:

(IN PAIN, UNCONVINCING) I'm doing fine. Couldn't be better.

McINTYRE:

You better stay in your hammock. I'll loosen the straps a little.

HARRIMAN:

(GROANS)

McINTYRE:

What is it?

HARRIMAN:

Nothing. Just go easy on that side.

McINTYRE:

Pop, you ain't foolin' me none. You got a couple o' busted ribs. Well, there isn't much I can do until we ground. You take a neobarbital and I'll wake you when we cut jets.

HARRIMAN:

No! No, no, I'll stay awake.

McINTYRE:

Okay. Just as you say, Pop.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE ... FOR A TRIP INTO OUTER SPACE

SOUND:

SHIP'S ENGINES PURR ... THEN IN BG

McINTYRE:

She's on automatic, Charlie. How are the tubes holding up?

CHARLIE:

Fine. Tight as a drum.

McINTYRE:

She handles nice.

CHARLIE:

How's Pop?

McINTYRE:

Alive, but he's in bad shape.

CHARLIE:

How bad?

McINTYRE:

Cracked a couple of ribs in the take-off. [I don't know what else.

CHARLIE:

You think he'll last the trip?

McINTYRE:

His heart was pounding like an off-time valve.

CHARLIE:

Well, he'll last. He's tough.

McINTYRE:

Tough? He's delicate as a canary.

CHARLIE:

I don't mean that. He's tough down inside where it counts. Just the same,] you'd better set it down awful easy if you want him alive.

McINTYRE:

I'll make a full swing around the Moon and ease her in on an [involute] approach curve. It'll go fine -- if we've got enough fuel.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

SHIP'S ENGINES PURR ... THEN IN BG

HARRIMAN:

(WAKES, MURMURS) What? Who called me?

McINTYRE:

Something wrong, Pop?

HARRIMAN:

I thought somebody was calling me. I - I must have been asleep.

McINTYRE:

I swung your hammock around. We're braking now. There she is ahead.

HARRIMAN:

(SAVORS THE VIEW) The Moon! I've seen a thousand photographs. There! That's Copernicus. And Tycho. And the new Minerva Mines Dome.

McINTYRE:

You know it all right, Pop.

HARRIMAN:

Where are you landing?

McINTYRE:

Mare Imbrium, between Aristillus and Archimedes.

HARRIMAN:

That's about forty miles from Luna City, isn't it?

McINTYRE:

Sure, sure.

HARRIMAN:

It won't be easy landing without ground approach radar, will it?

McINTYRE:

I've done it before.

HARRIMAN:

Not without a second pilot to punch the stadimeter.

McINTYRE:

(CHUCKLES) Pop, you ought to have a Mate's Ticket. You know the whole routine. You must have really studied up.

HARRIMAN:

Yes, that's all I could do -- study. Till now. (RAPT) Oh, look at her. The Moon. I feel as if I were coming home.

McINTYRE:

Yeah.

SOUND:

CLICK! OF SWITCH

McINTYRE:

Charlie?

CHARLIE:

(FILTER) Yo?

McINTYRE:

I'm taking her in. Cut in full power.

CHARLIE:

(FILTER) Make it good, Mac. Pop can't take a rough one.

McINTYRE:

Shut up and give me the power; I'll do my best. (BEAT) Okay. Stadimeter setting punched.

SOUND:

BUTTON PUNCHED

McINTYRE:

Hang on, here we go!

SOUND:

ENGINES UP ... THEN FADE BEHIND--

MUSIC:

BRIDGE ... FOR A LOUSY LANDING ... COMBINES WITH--

SOUND:

ROUGH LANDING OF SHIP ... THEN OUT

CHARLIE:

(UNHAPPY) That was a lousy landing, Mac.

McINTYRE:

(PROTESTS) Stadimeter drift.

CHARLIE:

How's our passenger?

McINTYRE:

Quiet. I'll look.

CHARLIE:

I wouldn't make any bets. That landing stunk.

McINTYRE:

Will you shut up? I did my best.

HARRIMAN:

(BREATHES HARD, CONTINUES IN BG)

McINTYRE:

Hey, Pop?

CHARLIE:

He's alive. (LOW) There's blood in his mouth.

McINTYRE:

He's trying to say something. All right, take it easy, Pop. We're down.

HARRIMAN:

(STRUGGLES TO SPEAK) Where--?

McINTYRE:

Take it easy.

HARRIMAN:

Vacuum suits -- where are they?

McINTYRE:

Now, steady, Pop, steady. You can't go out there yet. We've got to give you some first aid.

HARRIMAN:

G-give me that suit! (BREATHES HARD, CONTINUES IN BG)

CHARLIE:

What do you think, Mac?

McINTYRE:

Might as well get his suit out of the locker.

SOUND:

LOCKER OPENED, SUIT REMOVED, BEHIND--

McINTYRE:

Use the big one. He'll be more comfortable.

CHARLIE:

Okay, Pop. Easy now.

HARRIMAN:

Hurry. Hurry.

McINTYRE:

Seal these zippers, Charlie.

SOUND:

ZIP! ZIP! OF ZIPPERS

McINTYRE:

All right now, take it easy. (BEAT) All right, the helmet. Air diaphragm set?

CHARLIE:

Check.

McINTYRE:

Air valve?

CHARLIE:

Set.

McINTYRE:

Lift it on him.

CHARLIE:

Don't hit him. There.

SOUND:

CLICK! CLICK! OF HELMET LATCHED INTO PLACE

McINTYRE:

All right. Come on, Charlie. Let's get into our suits and we'll carry him out the lock.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

SLIGHT ECHO ON VOICES OF HELMETED CHARACTERS

McINTYRE:

Easy. Easy with him.

CHARLIE:

Okay. Okay. You all right, Pop?

HARRIMAN:

Outside. Take me outside.

McINTYRE:

His left leg is gone. Get your shoulder under him.

CHARLIE:

Right. Open the lock.

SOUND:

AIR LOCK DOOR SLIDES OPEN

McINTYRE:

All right, Pop. Come on. We're going out on the Moon.

MUSIC:

FOR A WALK ON THE MOON ... EERIE YET EXULTANT ... THEN IN BG

HARRIMAN:

(EXULTANT) The Moon!

McINTYRE:

All right. We're gonna leave you out here to look around -- while we get ready for the hike to town. You all right?

HARRIMAN:

(EXULTANT) The Moon!

McINTYRE:

We have to break out air bottles and rig a stretcher. It's forty miles in to the Dome. Charlie? Prop something behind his head.

CHARLIE:

Okay. (BEAT) There. Comfortable, Pop?

McINTYRE:

We'll be back soon.

MUSIC:

UP, TO SIGNAL AN INTERIOR MONOLOGUE ... THEN IN BG

HARRIMAN:

(QUIETLY EXULTANT) The Moon! I can feel the pumice dust. [And it doesn't hurt any more.] And there's the Earth overhead. The Earth in the sky ----- green-blue. I'm on the Moon.

CHARLOTTE:

(CALLS, FROM OFF) Del--? Del--?

HARRIMAN:

Charlotte? Thought somebody called my name. I'm getting old -- my mind wanders.

CHARLOTTE:

(CALLS, FROM OFF) Del--? Del--? Del--?

HARRIMAN:

Charlotte? That's you, isn't it? I made it, Charlotte! I'm on the Moon! You didn't understand. You were afraid I wouldn't take care of myself. But I made it!

CHARLOTTE: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Del--? Del--?

HARRIMAN:

(TRIUMPHANT) I'm on the Moon! (THEN MURMURS IN PAIN, DYING)

MUSIC:

FADES OUT

McINTYRE:

Come on, Charlie. We better get Pop goin'. Here, give me a hand getting him on the stretcher.

CHARLIE:

(BEAT) Never mind the stretcher, Mac.

McINTYRE:

What's the matter?

CHARLIE:

He won't need it. He's dead.

McINTYRE:

Oh. We'd better get out the pumice skiis and the air bottles; it's a long walk to town.

CHARLIE:

Yeah. What about him?

McINTYRE:

Looks as if he's resting, doesn't he? Propped up, looking out on the pumice.

CHARLIE:

Well, he got to the Moon. Come on, let's start walking.

MUSIC:

TO A FINISH

HOST:

You've just heard another adventure into the unknown world of the future, the world of--

SOUND:

CYMBAL CRASH

HOST:

(HEAVY ECHO) DIMENSION X-x-x-x-x- (TRAILS OFF)

MUSIC:

OMINOUS FUTURISTIC PERCUSSION ... THEN IN BG

HOST:

Imagine a planet somewhere in the universe where night comes only once in a thousand years. The friendly darkness night brings to our own world, on this far-off planet, is a thing of terror, a breeder of panic and evil. Be with us next week as we bring you Isaac Asimov's "Nightfall."

MUSIC:

WEIRD ACCENT ... THEN IN BG, TILL END

ANNOUNCER:

DIMENSION X is presented transcribed each week by the National Broadcasting Company in cooperation with Street and Smith, publishers of the magazine "Astounding Science Fiction." Today, DIMENSION X has presented "Requiem," written for radio by Ernest Kinoy from the story by Robert Heinlein. Featured in the cast were Rod Hendrickson as Harriman, Bill Quinn as McIntyre, and Owen Jordan as Charlie.