Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Our Miss Brooks
Show: Connie's Letter To Sandy Clawsss
Date: Dec 18 1949

ANCR:

Colgate Dental Cream to clean your breath while you clean your teeth and help stop tooth decay and Luster Creme Shampoo for soft, glamorous, caressable hear bring your "Our Miss Brooks" starring Eve Arden.

FX:

MUSIC (APPLAUSE) (under announcer)

ANCR:

Starring once again for another comedy episode of "Our Miss Brooks" written by Al Lewis

FX:

MUSIC STOP

ANCR:

Well, the Holiday Season is practically with us. To our Miss Brooks who teaches English at Madison High School, it means more than just a respite from the rigors of a difficult school term....

CONNIE:

Yes, it means that I'll get a chance to relax and observe the change that takes place in people as Christmas approaches. It's almost visible. The spirit of camaraderie, and warm good fellowship, which flows between us, like a bountiful stream. I only hope that this season our beloved principle, Mr. Osgood Conklin, will get a little on him. I was talking about his temper to my landlady last Friday morning at breakfast... I can't understand it Mrs. Davis. Everything I do lately seems to rub Mr. Conklin the wrong way.

MRS.:

What do you mean, Connie?

Connie:

Well, take yesterday for instance. I was in his office when I saw his lighted cigar lying on the rug unnoticed. Naturally I stooped over and picked it up. Wouldn't you?

MRS:

Well, I gave up smoking a long time ago.

Connie:

I didn't want the office to catch on fire, Mrs. Davis. So I merely put the cigar in an ashtray. You might not believe this, but he was furious.

Mrs.:

Because you put his cigar back in the ashtray?

Connie:

Well it wasn't exactly an ashtray. I guess I should have noticed it was an inkwell.

Mrs.:

Oh, and when you put his cigar in the inkwell it went out?

Connie:

That wasn't the end I put in the inkwell....Three puffs later, Mr. Conklin could have won first prize in the chow dog contest....He's so unreasonable. You'd think having a blue tongue was a crime.

Mrs.:

Maybe it was the taste of the ink he objected to. He's always been a finicky eater, anyway. But forget about Mr. Conklin, Connie. Just stay out of his way as much as possible.

Connie:

Believe me I'll do my best, Mrs. Davis. Say, that's quite a batch of mail you've got there. Is it all for you?

Mrs.:

Mail? Oh, this isn't incoming mail, Connie. These are the letters I picked up from all the kids in the neighborhood. You see, Bush's Department Store has a contest each year in which the child who writes the best letter to Santy Clause gets his choice of anything in the toy department.

Connie:

Oh, and you're Santa's helper.

Mrs.:

I shop there anyway, so I just drop them off for the kids. They write such cute letters, some of them. Reminds me of the one you wrote to Santa when you were 7 years old.

Connie:

Me? Where did you see that, Mrs. Davis?

Mrs.:

Forgive me, Connie, but I've got it right here. I took it out of your old album. You know, the scrapbook with the souvenirs in it. You had it out last night, remember.

Connie:

Oh, that's right. I thought I might run across some souvenir money in it...Let's see the letter, Mrs. Davis.

Mrs.:

Here you are dear. Read it out loud. I get such a kick out it.

Connie:

All right. It says Dear Sandy Claws. Look at this spelling... S A N D Y...C L A W S S S....That's nice...one S for each claw.

Mrs.:

Read on dear.

Connie:

"I don't want you to bring me very much toys at all 'cause then you would not have enough for all the other little children." Wasn't I a doll.... "Please Sandy, just bring me a slate with some chalk and a eraser and some crayons and a ruler on account cause when I grow up I want be a English teacher. Signed Connie Brooks, age 7." Isn't that touching Mrs. Davis? Even at that tender age I was already planning my future... Poverty.

Mrs.:

You knew what you wanted alright. Now I'll just set these letters on the sideboard and pour us some coffee.

FX:

FOOTSTEPS

Mrs.:

Here's your cup, Connie.

Connie:

Thanks Mrs. Davis. I'd better hurry. Walter Denton is picking me up this morning. Can we give you a lift?

Mrs.:

No thank you. I'm going over to Bush's Department Store. They have a contest each year in which a child who writes the best letter to Santy Clause gets a..a...

Connie:

His choice of anything in the toy department?

Mrs.:

How did you know, Connie?

Connie:

You just finished telling me Mrs. Davis.

Mrs.:

Oh, so I did. Now where in the world did I put those letters?

FX:

MUSIC UP....AUTOMOBILE SOUNDS

Brooks:

What have you done to your car, Walter? It seems to have quite an air about it this morning

Walter:

It's nothing but your own aromatic presence, Miss Brooks.

Brooks:

Thanks, Walter, but I'm not what I mean. Wait a minute, here's a cigar on the seat between us.

Walter:

Oh, probably dropped out of my dad's pocket. I drove him to work this morning.

Brooks:

Say, do you mind if I keep it. It might make a nice good morning gesture to Mr. Conklin. I can use one at this point.

Walter:

Oh, sure. My dad's got a pocket full of cigars. But what's wrong with you and old marble head, er, ...Mr. Conklin? Are you in the doghouse Miss Brooks?

Brooks:

Where I am shouldn't happen to a dog, Walter. But maybe this little peace offering will help.

FX:

(Sniff, Sniff)

Brooks:

It smells awfully sweet for a cigar.

Walter:

Oh, it isn't the cigar that has that sweet smell, Miss Brooks. That's Miss Enright.

Brooks:

Where is she sitting, in the glove compartment?

Walter:

No, I just dropped her off at the beauty parlor. She was wearing a new perfume. She said it was called Voodoo. Kind of clings to the upholstery doesn't it?

Brooks:

Just like Miss Enright. Oh, I'm sorry Walter. I shouldn't speak that way about another member of the faculty. Forget I said anything.

Walter:

Oh, sure. I know there's no love lost between you two. Although Miss Enright did pay you a rather nice compliment this morning.

Connie:

She did?

Walter:

Yes, Ma'am. She said she thought it was wonderful how you taught the subject of English.

Connie:

Miss Enright said that?

Walter:

Just before she went into the beauty parlor. She said that anybody who could teach a language to so many kids for such a long time in spite of her obvious difficulty in speaking that language should get a medal...

Connie:

Maybe the dryer will fall on her. By the way Walter, did Miss Enright mention her reason for going to the beauty parlor so early in the morning?

Walter:

Oh come to think of it, she did. She said she was going out with Mr. Boynton after school.

Connie:

But today's Friday, the day Mr. Boynton usually takes me to the Zoo.

Walter:

Well it's also specials occasion for Miss Enright. It's her birthday. And you know something Miss Brooks; she came right out and told me her age.

Connie :

How old did she say she was Walter?

Walter:

Twenty-seven. I guess that's why Mr. Boynton has to take her out today instead of you.

Connie:

I still don't see why Miss Enright's birthday has to do with it. He didn't take her out last year when she was 27, or the year before when she was 28.

Walter:

Uh, uh, uh, Miss Brooks. I seem to detect the presence of the green-eyed monster in this vehicle.

Connie:

She can't possibly be back from the beauty parlor yet. It just makes me mad, Walter, the way some women try to keep their ages hidden. Why if anybody wanted to make it their business, they could find out my age in a minute.

Walter:

How old are you Miss Brooks?

Connie:

None of your business.

FX:

MUSIC UP... footsteps

Walter:

There's Mr. Conklin going into his office Miss Brooks. Now's your chance to slip him that cigar.

Connie:

Right Walter, see you in Class.

FX:

FOOTSTEPS

Connie:

Good morning, Mr. Conklin.

Conklin:

Good morning, Miss Brooks.

Connie:

Have a cigar?

Conklin:

Cigar?

Connie:

Yes, sir. I just happened to have it on me. That is, a gentleman friend left it in my compact... here.... It's brand new, no ink on it.

Conklin:

Thank you Miss Brooks. Now if you'll excuse me I withdraw to the safety of my office while I'm still ahead.

Connie:

Yes Sir. Goodbye Mr. Conklin

Conklin:

Goodbye.

FX:

DOOR SHUT - STEPS

Enright:

Good Morning, Miss Brooks.

Connie:

Hello, Miss Enright. Walter Denton tells me that today's your birthday.

Enright:

Why yes, darling, it is.

Connie:

(coldly) Happy Birthday.

Enright:

Well I shall bask in the warmth of that greeting all day.

Connie:

Well I'm sorry Miss Enright, but I don't think its fair of you to make Mr. Boynton break a date with me just because its your birthday.

Enright:

Oh I didn't make him do anything Miss Brooks. It's obviously a matter of preference. Put down a brightly colored gay silk scarf and an old gray shoe and even a baby will reach for the scarf.

Connie:

Are you calling me an old gray shoe?

Enright:

Well if it fits darling, slip it on.

Connie:

Now look, Miss Enright, I don't want to be rude to you... On this of all days, especially since I realize that your birthday is one holiday which has been celebrated in this neighborhood for countless generations, but every Friday, Mr. Boynton takes me to the zoo.

Enright:

That's very cooperative, my dear. But if the zoo wants you badly enough they'll come and get you. Now you really must excuse me I've got to find Walter Denton's car. I left a cigar in the front seat this morning.

Connie:

Oh was that your cigar? I thought you smoked a pipe.

Enright:

It's for Mr. Boynton. He just a big overgrown boy when it comes to practical jokes you know, so I bought that cigar for him in the magic shop.

Connie:

In the magic shop?

Enright:

Yes, its an exploding cigar. Not dangerous of course, just full of soot.

Connie:

Oh, no. Excuse me, Miss Enright, but I've got to get back to Mr. Conklin's office right away.

FX:

RUNNING DOOR OPEN

Connie:

Mr. Conklin, about that cigar I gave you, Sir.

FX:

Blow smoke

Conklin:

Yes Miss Brooks?

FX:

BANG

Conklin:

(shouts) Oh God

Connie:

Mr. Conklin.. are you alright?

Conklin:

Why yes, yes Miss Brooks. I'm just dandy. But there's soot all over my face. What do you suggest I do about that?

Connie:

What can you do, Mr. Conklin, get down on one knee and sing April Showers.

FX:

MUSIC UP

ANCR:

Our Miss Brooks, starring Eve Arden will continue in just a moment. But first, here is Vern Smith.

VERN:

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FX:

MUSIC UP

Connie:

Well, I finally convinced Mr. Conklin that the cigar episode should be included in my list of unpremeditated crimes. Then when lunch period dragged itself around, I hastened to the cafeteria to see if Miss Enright was with Mr. Boynton. She wasn't, so in four seconds flat I was. I waited all during lunch for him to break our date for that afternoon, but he remained strangely silent. So while we were drinking our coffee, I summoned all my feminine wiles and subtly remarked "Is I is or is I ain't your Baby?"

FX:

coughing

Boynton:

What did you say Miss Brooks?

Connie:

Nothing, Mr. Boynton. Here's a napkin. It's just that I get a distinct feeling of guilt emanating from your side of the table.

Boynton:

Er....guilt? What makes you say that?

Connie:

You paid for my coffee.

Boynton:

Alright. You can pay for mine next time.

Connie:

I paid for yours last time. We're even. But today is Friday, Mr. Boynton, is that right.

Boynton:

That's right.

Connie:

And we usually go to the zoo on Friday. Isn't that so?

Boynton:

Yes, that's so.

Connie:

Well.

Boynton:

Well, what?

Connie:

Is I is or Is I ain't your Baby?

Boynton:

If you mean am I keeping our engagement Miss Brooks, well, uh... a funny thing happened this morning.

Connie:

On your way to the rabbit's cage?

Boynton:

Yes, as a matter of fact, I was in my lab when it happened. I remembered an appointment I made for this afternoon with somebody else.

Connie:

Namely?

Boynton:

My um..my grandmother. That's it. My grandmother came into town unexpectedly this morning and I promised to take her out for the day. She's rather helpless you see, because, well she's quite far along in years.

Connie:

You're not just clapping your crockery doc. It so happens Mr. Boynton that I know your grandmother.

Boynton:

You do?

Connie:

Yes, she's 27 years old and she teaches English at Madison High School.

Boynton:

Miss Brooks... I've decided that rather than stoop to deception; I'd better be honest about this thing. What I told you just now about my grandmother... it isn't true.

Connie:

No....

Boynton:

No I made a date with Miss Enright for today, but only because it's her birthday, Miss Brooks. She told me her folks were living in another part of the country.

Connie:

My folks live in another part of the country.

Boynton:

And Miss Enright also said she didn't have too many friends.

Connie:

I don't have too many friends.

Boynton:

But Miss Enright is 27 years old today.

Connie:

My folks live in another part of the country.

Boynton:

I'm sorry Miss Brooks. I just didn't want your feelings to be hurt.

Connie:

Don't worry about my feelings, Mr. Boynton. I've sent away for a plastic set.

Harriet:

Hi Miss Brooks, Mr. Boynton.

Connie:

Hello, Harriet.

Boynton:

How are you, Harriet. Would you care to sit down? There's plenty of room at this table.

Harriet:

Oh thanks just the same Mr. Boynton, but I've got to take this container of coffee to daddy.

Connie:

Oh is your father lunching in his office, Harriet?

Harriet:

Yes, he says he's too embarrassed to eat in public today. There seems to be something on his neck he can't get off.

Connie:

The Board of Education?

Harriet:

It's some black stuff. He didn't want to talk about it too much.

Connie:

Here, Harriet. Let me take that coffee down to him.

Harriet:

Oh, but I....

Connie:

It's the least I can do. You sit here and chat with Mr. Boynton, dear. He's very good company today. Loaded with stories.

Harriet:

Well, alright Miss Brooks, if you say so. Here's the coffee, and here's some extra sugar. Daddy likes it plenty sweet.

Connie:

Thanks Harriet.

Boynton:

I'll..uh..see you later won't I Miss Brooks?

Connie:

As we both get older you mean?

Boynton:

Please drop into my lab after school. Maybe we can work something out. Perhaps we can all have a date together.

Connie:

Fine, I'll bring my grandfather for Miss Enright.

FX:

MUSIC UP

FX:

KNOCK ON DOOR

Conklin:

Come in.

FX:

DOOR OPEN, STEPS

Connie:

I met your daughter in the cafeteria, Mr. Conklin, and she gave me this coffee to bring you.

Conklin:

What happened to her? Pull up lame?

Connie:

Well as a matter of fact, Sir, I wanted to sort of atone for some of my earlier transgressions.

Conklin:

Well don't stand there, pour some coffee in a cup for me, please.

Connie:

Yes, sir. I'll just get this cover off, it's on pretty tight.

Conklin:

Well... I hope its hot. If there's anything I can't stand its cool coffee.

Connie:

Oh, I'm sure it's piping hot, Mr. Conklin. I can tell by the way the container feels. This lid is soooo

Conklin:

Let me help you with that....

Connie:

No.. It's coming now.....Ohhhhhhh

Conklin:

Oooochhhhh... It is piping hot isn't it? Observe the steam rising from my trousers right here. Miss Brooks, yesterday you dipped my cigar in the inkwell. This morning you gave me one that exploded in my face, and now thanks to you again, a container of hot coffee is running down my leg...Well, don't stand there Miss Brooks. What have you to say for yourself?

Connie:

Is it sweet enough, Mr. Conklin?

FX:

MUSIC UP

FX:

KNOCK ON DOOR

Conklin:

If it isn't Miss Brooks, come in.

FX:

KNOCKING

Conklin:

I said, come in.

FX:

FOOTSTEPS

Bush:

You are Osgood Conklin?

Conklin:

I am

Bush:

No doubt you heard of Bush's Department Store.

Conklin:

I have

Bush:

Well, I'm Bush

Conklin:

I'm a little pooped myself. Sit down.

Bush:

I'll be brief, Mr. Conklin. Each year my store gives away contest prizes to children who write in the best letters to Santa Clause. We like to choose some prominent citizens in our community to play Santa for this occasion, hence my visit here.

Conklin:

My Dear Mr. Bush, if you're suggesting that I involve myself in the squalling clamor of hundreds of children in a department store put it out of your mind.

Bush:

But Mr. Conklin....

Conklin:

You have no way of know this of course, but I am a man of extremely high blood pressure and acute hypertension. Playing Santa to a band of yowling brats is out of the question

Bush:

But I've invited all the photographers and reporters, Mr. Conklin. You'll get at the very least a two-column picture in every paper.

Conklin:

I'm sorry. It's absolutely unthinkable for me to..to...Two column picture?

Bush:

Of course. You see we've picked the winning letter and you're the ideal choice to present the grand prize this afternoon.

Conklin:

Why me?

Bush:

because you're a school principal and the contest winner is a little seven-year-old girl who wants to be a teacher when she grows up.

Conklin:

A teacher? Well, I guess I can arrange it. I'd hate to disappoint a child, especially this obviously backward little tyke. What time shall I be there Mr. Bush.

Bush:

Four o'clock sharp, please. And thank you so much for accepting our invitation.

Conklin:

Your welcome, I'm sure. Now if you'll excuse me sir, I must inspect some new gym equipment that just arrived.

Bush:

Of course, Mr. Conklin. Oh, before I leave your office may I use the phone.

Conklin:

Certainly. Right there on my desk

Fx:

footsteps

Conklin:

See you at 4, Mr. Bush.

Bush:

Right. Thank you.

FX:

Door close

Bush:

(Singing) Santa Clause is coming to town.

FX:

phone ringing

Davis:

(phone) Hello, Mrs. Davis speaking.

Bush:

This is Mr. Bush of Bush's Department Store. My secretary gave me your phone number Mrs. Davis and told me what a grand job you've done of rounding up the children's letters in our "Letter to Santa" contest.

Davis:

(Phone) I was glad to help, Mr. Bush.

Bush:

Thank you, Mrs. Davis. Now there's just one bit of information I need from you. Do you know where Connie Brooks lives.

Davis:

(phone) Connie Brooks? Certainly. She lives right here with me.

Bush:

Well that's a coincidence. Can I speak with her?

Davis:

Not now, she's still in school.

Bush:

Oh, ho, of course. It's not 3 o'clock yet.

Davis:

As a matter of fact I was just getting ready to pick her up. One of the students in school with her usually takes her home, but he's busy today.

Bush:

I see. Well Mrs. Davis you can do me a great favor. Instead of taking her home today, bring Connie right over to our store.

Davis:

What for?

Bush:

You'll see. What kind of toys does she favor, Mrs. Davis?

Davis:

Toys? Connie doesn't play with toys.

Bush:

Oh, the serious type, eh? Well, bring her over as early as you can Mrs. Davis so I can get acquainted with her. She'll probably warm up a bit after a nice romp in the sand pile. Now remember Mrs. Davis don't tell her why she's coming to the store. I'd like it to be a surprise.

Davis:

Oh, it'll be a surprise all right.

FX:

MUSIC - STORE NOISES IN BACKGROUND

Connie:

Now will you please tell me what we're doing in Bush's department store, Mrs. Davis? I haven't enough money left to buy a Christmas seal, let along do any shopping.

Davis:

Be patient, Connie. We'll find out as soon as I can locate Mr. Bush. I know, let's cut out for the sand pile. It's right over there in the toy department.

Connie:

All right... Oh look, there's Mr. Boynton.

Boynton:

Oh, hello Miss Brooks, Mrs. Davis.

Davis:

Hello Mr. Boynton. Excuse me just a moment won't you. I'll go on ahead Connie and find Mr. Bush.

Connie:

Fine, Mrs. Davis. Well, Mr. Boynton, doing a little last minute Christmas shopping.

Boynton:

Oh, not exactly Miss Brooks. Miss Enright asked me to come over here right after school. She's crazy about children she says and they're having some sort of contest here today.

Connie:

Where is she now?

Boynton:

Oh, she's in the hardware department picking up a new roaster. She says next to children she likes nothing better than cooking and housework.

Connie:

I bet she's terribly decent to animals too.

Boynton:

I'm sorry I didn't you after school, but Miss Enright insisted we leave at once, after all it is...

Connie:

Her birthday, today. I know, Mr. Boynton. I had a hunch you two would wind up alone.

Boynton:

Oh, we're only going to a movie, Miss Brooks. Donald O'Connor in "Francis" just opened at the State. It's the story of an army mule.

Connie:

Oh? That's where you're taking Miss Enright?

Boynton:

That's right.

Connie:

What are you trying to do, start your own mule train?

Enright:

I just got the most charming pot, darling. Oh... you've acquired one of your own, haven't you Mr. Boynton.

Connie:

Helloooo, Prudence. Cooked any interesting children lately.

Boynton:

Please, ladies, please. Let's get over to the toy department. They're getting ready for the ceremonies. The spotlight was just turned on the platform.

Enright:

Oh, fine, Mr. Boynton. I just adore toys.

Connie:

Oh, why don't you act your age.

Boynton:

Come along Miss Brooks. I see Mrs. Davis right in the front row.

FX:

DRUMROLL

Bush:

Attention.. Attention... Quiet please, children.. quiet, quiet. Here without further ado is your old friend Santa Clause....

FX:

CHILDREN CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

Conklin:

Ho, ho, ho. Merry Christmas kiddies.

Connie:

Why that's Mr. Conklin.

Boynton:

Is it really?

Conklin:

Ho, Ho, Ho.

Connie:

Of course, I'd recognize that bloodthirsty cheerfulness anywhere.

Bush:

Here you are Santa. Here's the prize winning letter in the contest. Now suppose you read it out loud and we'll surprise the author who I know is among those listening.

Conklin:

Surely, surely. (clear throat) It says "Dear Sandy Clawsss, spelled C L A W S S S , ha, ha, ha

Connie:

That's nice, one "s" for each paw

Conklin:

I don't want you to bring me very much toys at all cause then you would not have enough for all the other little children...

Connie:

Isn't she a doll. Wait a minute, this sound awfully familiar....

Conklin:

Please Sandy just bring me a slate with some chalk and a eraser and some crayons and a ruler cause when I grow up I want to be a English teacher.

Connie:

Ohhh, noooo.

Conklin: Signed, Connie Brooks, age 7. Now if this little girl will step up....
CONNIE BROOKS......

Connie: Age 7

Bush:

You sound like you know this girl, Mr. Conklin. Now let's get her up to the platform. Where are you honey?

Davis:

Yoohoo, Mr. Bush. Down here. I'm Mrs. Davis.

Bush:

Oh, hello, Mrs. Davis.

Davis:

The girl you're looking for is standing right here beside me.

Bush:

What? Who are you?

Connie:

(little girl voice) I'm Connie Brooks, age 7.

Conklin:

Miss Brooks, what's the meaning of this.

Bush:

Yes, what is this hoax?

Connie:

Oh, there was no hoax intended gentlemen. Mrs. Davis must have absent-mindedly put my letter in with the other kids. When I wrote that letter I was actually 7 years old.

Enright:

You were never that young, darling.

Bush:

Oh this is terrible, the press and photographers will be here any minute. Give me that bag of toys Mr. Conklin. This girl gets nothing.

Boynton:

now hold on there, Mr. Bush. The contest rules clearly state that the winner must be a child. If Miss Brooks was 7 years old when she wrote that letter, she's entitled to take home anything she wants from the toy department.

FX:

(ALL - "YES")

Connie:

I think you've got something there Mr. Boynton.

Bush:

Now this is terribly embarrassing. Miss Brooks if you'll just leave the premises before the press arrives, you may have anything in the toy department you desire. What do you want?

Connie:

Mr Bush, this is Mr. Boynton. Wrap him up.

FX:

MUSIC UP

ANCR:

Eve Arden returns in just a moment, but first

SINGER:

Dream Girl, Dream Girl, beautiful Luster Creme Girl.

ANCR:

Tonight, yes, tonight, show him how much lovelier your hair can look after a Luster Creme shampoo. Luster Creme worlds finest shampoo. No other shampoo in the world gives ??? magic blend of secret ingredients plus gentle lanolin. Not a soap, not a liquid, luster creme shampoo leaves hair three ways lovelier. Fragrantly clean, free of loose dandruff, glistening with sheen, soft manageable even in hardest water, Luster Creme lathers instantly. No special rinse needed after a Luster Creme shampoo. So gentle, Luster Creme is wonderful even for children's hair. Tonight, yes, tonight, try Luster Creme shampoo.

FX:

music

Singer:

Dream Girl, dream girl, beautiful Luster Creme girl. You own crowning glory to a Luster Creme Shampoo.

ANCR:

And now once again here is Eve Arden.

Connie:

This Christmas give yourself and your family the gift that keeps on giving, United States Savings Bonds, the present with a future, and buy Savings Bonds regularly. Start preparing now for those things you know you're going to want and need in the future. If you're on a regular payroll, use the easy payroll savings plan. If you're self employed use the bond a month plan. Invest today in security. Your own economic security and the security of your country. Buy United States Savings Bonds today.

FX:

MUSIC

ANCR:

Next week tune into another Our Miss Brooks show brought to you by Luster Creme Shampoo, for soft glamorous, caressable hair and Colgate Dental Cream to clean your breath while you clean your teeth and help stop tooth decay. Our Miss Brooks starring Eve Arden is produced by Larry Burns, directed by Al Lewis, with Music by Wilbur Hatch. Mr. Boynton is played by Jeff Chandler, Mr. Conklin by Gale Gordon. Others in tonight's cast were Jane Morgan, Dick Crenna, Gloria McMillan, Mary Jane Croft and Hal March.

FX:

MUSIC UP

Ancr:

Here's good shaving news. Three men out of every four can get more comfortable actually smoother shaves with Palmolive Brushless Shaving Cream. This is not just a claim, here's the proof. Twelve hundred ninety seven men tried the Palmolive Brushless way to shave described on the tube and now matter now they shaved before, three men out of every four got more comfortable, actually smoother shaves. Try Palmolive Brushless yourself. See if you don't get more comfortable, actually smoother shaves the proved Palmolive Brushless way.

For Mystery liberally sprinkled with laughs, listen to Mr. And Mrs. North, the exciting fun packed adventures of an amateur detective and his beautiful wife. Tune in Tuesday evening over most of these same stations and be with us again next week at this same time for another comedy episode of Our Miss Brooks. Bob Lamond speaking.

This is CBS, The Columbia Broadcasting System.