Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Lux Radio Theater
Show: The Bishop's Wife
Date: Dec 19 1949

CAST:

The Lux Team:
ANNOUNCER, John Milton Kennedy
WILLIAM KEIGHLEY, your host
MARY WILLS, intermission guest
LIBBY COLLINS, Hollywood reporter

The Leads:
DUDLEY, the angel / TYRONE POWER
HENRY, the bishop / DAVID NIVEN
JULIA, the bishop's wife / JANE GREER

The Supporting Characters:
PROFESSOR WUTHERIDGE, elderly
MISS CASSAWAY, Henry's secretary
MATILDA, the housekeeper
DEBBY, young daughter of Henry and Julia
MILLER, at St. Timothy's
BOBBY, choir boy
RUPERT, choir boy
MRS. HAMILTON, imperious and wealthy widow
STEVENS, her butler
SYLVESTER, the cab driver

plus NOISY KIDS at the park,
BOYS who sing a "Away in the Manger" and "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing"
and an even more impressive CHOIR of angels (2 lines of singing)

NOTE: Another version of this play aired on LUX, May 11 1953. This transcript includes material from the '53 broadcast in brackets.

ANNOUNCER:

Lux presents Hollywood!

MUSIC:

THEME ... THEN IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

Lever Brothers Company, the makers of Lux Flakes, bring you "The Lux Radio Theatre," starring Tyrone Power, David Niven and Jane Greer in "The Bishop's Wife." Ladies and gentlemen, your producer, Mr. William Keighley!

MUSIC:

THEME ... UP AND OUT

SOUND:

APPLAUSE

KEIGHLEY:

Greetings from Hollywood, ladies and gentlemen. Home again, after an absence of a year and a half, is one of America's favorite stars, and he's here tonight to lend an extra thrill to our holiday season. I mean, of course, Tyrone Power, who joins David Niven and Jane Greer in our Christmas present to you, the delightful play, "The Bishop's Wife." Samuel Goldwyn's fine and sensitive screen production won your hearts as well as your applause. And those who saw the picture will have a special welcome tonight for David Niven, who plays his original screen role as the bishop.

I'm sure most of you are quite busy these days with last-minute shopping and getting the house in order for the holidays, a time of year when you'll need plenty of -- Lux Flakes. In fact, there's a most unusual holiday use for Lux Flakes -- on your Christmas tree -- which we'll tell you about later.

Now, the curtain for Act One of "The Bishop's Wife," starring Tyrone Power as Dudley, David Niven as the bishop, and Jane Greer as Julia.

MUSIC:

GENTLE INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

KEIGHLEY:

It's a late afternoon in December. In a rather shabby section of a large city, two old friends have an unexpected meeting. [X]

PROFESSOR:

(PLEASED) Julia! What a wonderful surprise. My dear, beautiful Julia.

JULIA:

(EQUALLY PLEASED) Professor Wutheridge! But what are you doing here?

PROFESSOR:

I'm about to negotiate the purchase of a Christmas tree.

JULIA:

I didn't know you celebrated Christmas. I thought you had no religion.

PROFESSOR:

I don't. But I like a Christmas tree. Reminds me of my childhood. (CHUCKLES) Can you imagine me ever having been a child? Tell me, how's Henry?

JULIA:

Oh, he's well, I suppose. But so tired and worried.

PROFESSOR:

Raising money for the new cathedral, huh?

JULIA:

It's slow work, Professor. And you? How's your book coming?

PROFESSOR:

Oh, splendidly. Greatest history of Rome since Gibbon's.

JULIA:

I wish it weren't so late. The cathedral committee's meeting with Henry. I really should be there.

PROFESSOR:

Well, one of these days, we'll have time for a nice talk again. Oh, here. Here, for Henry's cathedral fund.

JULIA:

This coin?

PROFESSOR:

It has very little value, I'm afraid. Just an old Roman coin. I picked it up years ago in Italy.

JULIA:

Oh, it's a wonderful contribution.

PROFESSOR:

Nonsense. Might be called the widow's mite, only I'm not a widow. (CONCERNED) Julia? What's the matter?

JULIA:

(UNHAPPY) Nothing. I-- Oh, if Henry and I could only spend Christmas back here -- where we were so happy -- with you -- with all our old friends.

PROFESSOR:

(SOOTHING) Now, now, now.

JULIA:

Oh, I'm sorry. It was really very childish of me. Goodbye, Professor.

PROFESSOR:

Goodbye, Julia.

SOUND:

JULIA'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY

DUDLEY:

Why, Professor! How good to see you again.

PROFESSOR:

Hm? Who are you?

DUDLEY:

And how well you look after all these years. Well, don't you remember me?

PROFESSOR:

Well, let's see. It, uh-- It wasn't Vienna, was it?

DUDLEY:

(HAPPY MEMORY) Vienna. Beautiful, old Vienna.

PROFESSOR:

When I was lecturing on Roman history?

DUDLEY:

And what splendid lectures they were. And what a one you were with the ladies!

PROFESSOR:

Fancy you remembering that.

DUDLEY:

I, er-- I've been standing on the corner watching you, Professor -- you and Julia.

PROFESSOR:

You know Julia?

DUDLEY:

In a way, yes.

PROFESSOR:

Poor girl.

DUDLEY:

She's unhappy?

PROFESSOR:

Yes. (SUSPICIOUS) When were you in Vienna?

DUDLEY:

Oh, many times. I, er-- I'm interested in Julia, Professor -- and Henry. What seems to be their trouble?

PROFESSOR:

Oh, no special trouble, I imagine.

DUDLEY:

Henry's a bishop now, hm?

PROFESSOR:

Oh, yes. That used to be his church over there.

DUDLEY:

St. Timothy's.

PROFESSOR:

Perishing from neglect.

DUDLEY:

It's such a nice, little church. (MOVING OFF) Well, delighted to have seen you again, Professor.

SOUND:

DUDLEY'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY

PROFESSOR:

(TO HIMSELF) Strange. Unless I've completely lost my memory, I've never seen that fellow before in my life.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR CLOSES

HENRY:

Julia?

JULIA:

(APPROACHES) I'm terribly sorry I'm so late, Henry. Has everyone gone?

HENRY:

(GRIM) Yes, dear -- some time ago.

JULIA:

Not another argument, Henry? Mrs. Hamilton--

HENRY:

Mrs. Hamilton is a selfish, vain, old-- She made it very clear, Julia. Either we build the cathedral the way she wants it or it won't be built at all. Oh, what a ghastly meeting!

JULIA:

You didn't give in to her?

HENRY:

Indeed not. I made it very clear I have no intention of being strangled by her purse strings.

JULIA:

Oh, Henry. I'm proud of you.

HENRY:

I had a most unchristian impulse to take those blueprints and give her a good whack over her -- mink coat. ...

MISS CASSAWAY:

I beg your pardon, Bishop.

HENRY:

Yes, Miss Cassaway?

MISS CASSAWAY:

Mr. Trevor's on the phone.

JULIA:

Tell him the bishop will call him back, please -- after dinner.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Yes, Mrs. Brougham.

JULIA:

(QUIET) Henry -- what's happened to you? To us? To our marriage?

HENRY:

That's a strange question to ask.

JULIA:

No. We used to be so happy. We used to make other people happy. Henry, that was your gift. You're no financier and you're no promoter. Kowtowing to people, flattering them, begging them.

HENRY:

It's got to be done, Julia. I want this cathedral to stand like a great beacon! I want its light to shine! I want--!

JULIA:

(WEARY) Yes, yes, Henry. Oh, here. Here's a contribution I collected.

HENRY:

Oh? What is it?

JULIA:

It's an old Roman coin. From Professor Wutheridge.

HENRY:

Well, what does he think I can do with it?

JULIA:

Well, it's a beginning. Now all you need is just another four million dollars.

HENRY:

Julia, don't be flippant about this! (BEAT) Well, if dinner's ready, let's have it over with. I've a lot of work to do tonight. (FADES OUT)

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... DINNER TABLE BACKGROUND

JULIA:

The soup's very good, Matilda.

MATILDA:

Oh, thank you, Mrs. Brougham.

HENRY:

Oh, Julia, I'm - I'm sorry I was so thoughtless just now. I was - I was just thinking-- Tomorrow, perhaps we could spend the day together.

JULIA:

(PLEASED) Henry!

HENRY:

Call on the professor maybe. Have lunch at Michel's.

JULIA:

Michel's! Oh, it's been years since we've been there.

MISS CASSAWAY:

(APPROACHES) Uh, please forgive me.

HENRY:

Yes, Miss Cassaway?

MISS CASSAWAY:

Well, I've been trying to explain to Mr. Trevor, but he simply insists upon talking to you.

HENRY:

(APOLOGETIC) Oh, Julia--

JULIA:

He's on the cathedral committee, isn't he? Well, go ahead, dear. You'd better talk to him. (FADES OUT)

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE

HENRY:

(INTO PHONE) Yes, Mr. Trevor. Very well, Mr. Trevor, I'll be there. -- Ten-thirty tomorrow morning? -- Good night.

SOUND:

RECEIVER DOWN

HENRY:

You may as well go home now, Miss Cassaway.

MISS CASSAWAY:

But there's still a great deal of work to do, sir.

HENRY:

You're a secretary, not a machine. Now, run along.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Thank you. Oh, and don't forget, you have a speech to make tomorrow at the Junior Assembly.

HENRY:

(HE FORGOT) Oh, no. What time?

MISS CASSAWAY:

It's a luncheon meeting, one o'clock. (MOVING OFF) Good night, Bishop.

HENRY:

Good night, Miss Cassaway.

MUSIC:

DARK AND HEAVY ... FOR A DESPERATE PRAYER ... IN BG

HENRY:

(PRAYS) Oh, God. What am I to do? Can't you help me? Can't you tell me? Oh, God, please. Please help me.

MUSIC:

TURNS MYSTICAL ... CONTINUES IN BG

SOUND:

STUDY DOOR CLOSES

HENRY:

Yes?

DUDLEY:

Good evening.

HENRY:

Oh. What can I do for you?

DUDLEY:

That isn't the question, Henry.

HENRY:

Oh? Well, what is it?

DUDLEY:

What can I do for you?

HENRY:

Look, I'm afraid you must telephone for an appointment. I'm in the middle of dinner.

DUDLEY:

I know, Henry. But you asked for help, you know.

HENRY:

I asked--? (BEAT) Who told you I asked for help?

DUDLEY:

Well, you are known to be a good man and you were heard. I was instructed to come here in answer to your prayer.

HENRY:

Who are you?

DUDLEY:

I'm an angel.

MUSIC:

AN ACCENT ... THEN OUT

HENRY:

I beg your pardon? ...

DUDLEY:

An angel.

HENRY:

An angel? (QUICKLY, TO HIMSELF) I knew it! I knew it! I've been working too hard.

DUDLEY:

Now-now-now-- ... Don't be alarmed. I - I know it's hard to believe, even for you, but -- this is my district, and I--

HENRY:

Do you mind if I sit down?

DUDLEY:

No, no. Please, do. And now let's see. You have some problems concerning the building of a new cathedral?

HENRY:

Yes.

DUDLEY:

Oh, here - here's a picture of it. Beautiful. Magnificent. Well, Henry, do you believe I am what I say I am?

HENRY:

Well, how can I? I've nothing but your word for it.

DUDLEY:

But you are a bishop. You, of all people, can trust the word of an angel.

HENRY:

Well, what do you propose to do? Perform a miracle?

DUDLEY:

If necessary.

HENRY:

Well, why don't you? Why don't you - create a cathedral with a wave of your hand?

DUDLEY:

Oh, no, no. You wouldn't want me to do that, would you? How would you explain it?

HENRY:

Well, I--

JULIA:

(OFF) Henry? Is anything wrong?

SOUND:

STUDY DOOR OPENS

JULIA:

(SURPRISED) Oh. Oh, I'm sorry. I didn't know you had a caller.

DUDLEY:

Oh, how have you been, Julia? I'm Dudley. Henry is engaging me to help him with his work.

JULIA:

You mean you're going to be his assistant?

DUDLEY:

That's it exactly. I'm going to try to help Henry to get some relaxation.

JULIA:

(PLEASED) Oh, that's what I've been praying for!

DUDLEY:

Oh, you, too, hm?

JULIA:

Henry, I'm so relieved, dear. Where do you come from, Dudley?

DUDLEY:

Oh, all around.

HENRY:

Julia, this man claims that he's an a-- a--

DUDLEY:

I - I've been doing social service work downtown.

HENRY:

Julia, if you don't mind, I must talk to this - gentleman alone.

JULIA:

We were just having dinner, Dudley. Won't you join us?

DUDLEY:

Well, that's very kind of you, but I really must go. I'll see you both in the morning.

HENRY:

In the morning?

DUDLEY:

Oh, yes -- bright and early.

JULIA:

(MOVING OFF) I'll wait in the dining room, Henry. Good night.

DUDLEY:

(VERY AFFECTIONATELY) Oh, good night, Julia.

HENRY:

(BEAT) Are you, uh-- Are you sure you're an angel? ...

DUDLEY:

Oh, I - I know it isn't easy, Henry, but you've just got to take me on faith.

HENRY:

Yes, but for how long? How long will it take?

DUDLEY:

Until you can utter another prayer and say that you have no further need of me. Then I'll be gone and forgotten. (BEAT) Julia's waiting, Henry.

MUSIC:

FOR DUDLEY'S DEPARTURE, BEHIND--

HENRY:

Yes, I know. But, I still don't understand-- Dudley? Dudley, where are you? (NO ANSWER) Dudley?

MUSIC:

UP AND OUT

SOUND:

DINNER TABLE BACKGROUND

JULIA:

What's wrong, Henry? You look so pale.

HENRY:

Do I?

JULIA:

Sit down, dear. Henry, what's the rest of Dudley's name?

HENRY:

I don't know.

JULIA:

Why, Henry, you're trembling.

HENRY:

I'm not surprised; a lesser man would - would quiver.

JULIA:

Well, you'll feel better after you've eaten. Matilda's baked your favorite dessert, dear -- angel food cake.

HENRY:

(BIG SPIT TAKE, SIMULTANEOUS WITH--)

SOUND:

RATTLE! OF DINNER TABLE

JULIA:

Henry? Henry, what is it?

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

MISS CASSAWAY:

Bishop? Bishop Brougham?

HENRY:

Oh, good morning, Miss Cassaway.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Why, I was just in your study, sir. There's a man in there. He says he's your new assistant.

HENRY:

(UNHAPPY) Oh, then he did come back.

MISS CASSAWAY:

He says we're going to be working together.

HENRY:

Yes, there doesn't seem much I can do about it. Well - well, run along to the office, Miss Cassaway, I'll go in and see him.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Yes, sir.

SOUND:

STUDY DOOR OPENS

DUDLEY:

Well, here I am, Henry. Completely at your service.

HENRY:

It may interest you to know I didn't sleep twenty minutes last night. And I don't mind adding I'm in a highly nervous condition.

DUDLEY:

Oh, well, then the first thing we'll have to-- (VERY GLAD TO SEE HER) Oh, good morning, Julia.

JULIA:

Good morning, Dudley. It's a lovely day.

DUDLEY:

Lovely!

JULIA:

Henry and I are going out together.

HENRY:

Oh, Julia, I'm terribly sorry, but we can't. I - I've got to see Mr. Trevor at ten-thirty and, after that, there's the Junior Assembly.

JULIA:

But you promised, Henry.

HENRY:

Yes. I - I know I did.

JULIA:

But-- Well, Dudley could represent you at those meetings, couldn't he?

DUDLEY:

Could I?

HENRY:

That's out of the question. They expect me. It would never do if I sent an a-- a-- assistant. ... Excuse us, Dudley; I want to speak to my wife.

DUDLEY:

Oh, of course.

HENRY:

In the hall, dear.

SOUND:

STUDY DOOR SHUTS

HENRY:

Julia, you see, the trouble is-- Well, that man in there-- Oh, I can't explain.

JULIA:

(SIGHS) You needn't try, Henry.

HENRY:

Oh, but you mustn't think--

JULIA:

(RESIGNED) This is the way it is. This is the way it always will be. Well, I'll tell Matilda she can have the day off for Christmas shopping. I'll take care of Debby. (MOVING OFF) I'll see you at dinner, Henry.

SOUND:

STUDY DOOR OPENS

HENRY:

What are you doing, Dudley?

DUDLEY:

I'm just looking through your files, Henry. Well, I see that Mrs. Hamilton has pledged a million dollars to the cathedral fund, but she hasn't sent her check.

HENRY:

Never mind that file! That's work for a bookkeeper, not an a-- a-- Work for a bookkeeper.

DUDLEY:

Well. So you're beginning to believe in me.

HENRY:

I don't know who you are. I don't know where you came from or who sent you. I only wish you'd make haste.

DUDLEY:

Because the cathedral must be built?

HENRY:

Obviously, that's the most important thing.

DUDLEY:

Or because Julia must be happy? It's going to be difficult to help you, Henry, unless I'm sure of what it is that you really want.

HENRY:

Yes, well, I'm afraid you'll have to excuse me. Mr. Trevor likes punctuality.

DUDLEY:

Well, run along, Henry. This file's in an awful mess. I think I'll re-organize it.

HENRY:

(MOVING OFF) I still think you're wasting your time on unimportant details.

DUDLEY:

(CALLS AFTER HIM) Oh, nothing's unimportant, Henry! Remember, we're interested in even the lowliest sparrow! (SINGS AN OLD HYMN, TO HIMSELF) "Bringing in the sheaves, bringing in the sheaves ..." (CROONS WORDLESSLY)

SOUND:

[RAPID SHUFFLE OF INDEX CARDS, IN AND OUT OF FILE, DURING ABOVE]

DEBBY:

(OFF) Hello?

DUDLEY:

Oh, hello, Debby. Well, come in, come in.

DEBBY:

How did you do that just now? All those cards in Daddy's file. You just waved your hand and they all jumped out of the box and jumped in again.

DUDLEY:

Oh, that. Well, that's just my system of rearranging card files.

DEBBY:

Do it again.

DUDLEY:

Some other time, hm?

DEBBY:

You're Dudley, aren't you? Mommy told me. Mommy says you're very nice.

DUDLEY:

Well, that's extremely kind of Mommy.

DEBBY:

She said that maybe with you here, maybe we'll get to see Daddy once in a while.

DUDLEY:

Yes, maybe we will.

JULIA:

(OFF) Debby? That'll be enough out of you, dear. Come along.

DEBBY:

Yes, Mommy.

DUDLEY:

Oh, so you're going out?

DEBBY:

To the park! (MOVING OFF) I'm going to play in the snow! Goodbye, Dudley!

DUDLEY:

Goodbye, Debby. Have a good time.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

SOUND:

NOISY KIDS PLAYING IN THE SNOW AT THE PARK ... THEN IN BG

DUDLEY:

Julia!

JULIA:

Dudley? I didn't expect to see you here.

DUDLEY:

Oh, I often walk in the park. Well, Debby seems to be having a fine time. Regular snowbird.

JULIA:

Aren't you supposed to be working?

DUDLEY:

I always take a walk before lunch. Relaxing, you know.

JULIA:

Oh, I wish you could convince Henry of that.

DUDLEY:

Speaking of lunch, Julia, I thought I'd go to Michel's. Ever been there?

JULIA:

Michel's?! Oh, yes. We used to go there often -- years ago.

DUDLEY:

Well, how about going there today?

JULIA:

You and I? To Michel's? Oh, no. No, I couldn't.

DUDLEY:

Why not?

JULIA:

Well--

DUDLEY:

Surely you don't think Henry would mind?

JULIA:

Oh, no, no, it isn't that. Well, you see, Matilda's off shopping, and I'll have to look after Debby.

DUDLEY:

Oh, yes. Yes. But here's Matilda now.

MATILDA:

(OFF) Hello, Mrs. Brougham!

JULIA:

(SURPRISED) Matilda?

MATILDA:

I just thought, Mrs. Brougham-- I just thought that, if you wish, I'll take Debby home.

JULIA:

But, Matilda, your shopping--?

MATILDA:

Oh, I finished it! I finished it so quick, it was just like a miracle.

DUDLEY:

You don't say?

MATILDA:

I thought Debby might like to go home and make Christmas cookies.

JULIA:

Oh, I'm sure she'd love to, but--

MATILDA:

(MOVING OFF) Well, then, Mrs. Brougham, I'll just go and get her.

DUDLEY:

Well, Julia? Michel's?

JULIA:

(DISCONCERTED) I - I think that would be very nice.

DUDLEY:

Good.

JULIA:

Dudley?

DUDLEY:

Yes?

MUSIC:

MYSTICAL, IN BG

JULIA:

Just a minute ago, when you said you saw Matilda--

DUDLEY:

Yes?

JULIA:

Oh, it's nonsense.

DUDLEY:

What's nonsense?

JULIA:

You were looking the other way when you said you saw her.

DUDLEY:

Oh. I was?

JULIA:

I mean - I mean, I thought you were. (CHUCKLES) How silly of me. Wait here, Dudley. I'll say goodbye to Debby.

MUSIC:

UP FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN OUT

HENRY:

Julia? Julia? I'm home, Julia!

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR CLOSES

MATILDA:

Why, Bishop! I thought you were out for lunch.

HENRY:

Well, I canceled my appointment, Matilda. Are Mrs. Brougham and Debby here?

MATILDA:

Well, Debby's upstairs, sir, but Missus went out to lunch with Mr. Dudley.

HENRY:

Ah, well, she said-- (BEAT, AGHAST) With Dudley?!

MATILDA:

Why, yes, sir. I thought you knew, sir.

HENRY:

Oh. Yes. Of course.

SOUND:

HENRY STALKS OUT AND SLAMS STUDY DOOR

MATILDA:

(DISMAYED) Oh, dear.

MUSIC:

ROMANTIC ... SMALL BAND AT RESTAURANT ... CONTINUES IN BG, OUT WARMLY AT [X]

JULIA:

I'm so glad you knew about Michel's, Dudley. It's so nice to be back here again. Only--

DUDLEY:

Only?

JULIA:

Well, you seem to know so much. (CHUCKLES) Makes me feel uncomfortable.

DUDLEY:

Well, in that case, I'm sorry I ever learned anything. (BEAT) You have memories of this place, haven't you?

JULIA:

Yes. As a matter of fact, it was in this restaurant that Henry asked me to marry him.

DUDLEY:

Yes, I know.

JULIA:

You know?

DUDLEY:

I - I mean, I know how you must feel. (BEAT) Hm, there's a fortune teller over there. You care to have your palm read?

JULIA:

No, thank you. Would you?

DUDLEY:

Oh, I know too much about myself as it is.

JULIA:

And I - I know so little about myself.

DUDLEY:

Oh, really? May I look at your hand?

JULIA:

Can you tell fortunes, too?

DUDLEY:

It's not too difficult.

JULIA:

Well, what do you see?

DUDLEY:

Hm. I never noticed, Julia. Your eyes are green. I see a great deal of happiness. I see a woman who's adored. I see a rich, full life. [X]

JULIA:

Do you see Henry's new cathedral?

DUDLEY:

Uh, no. No, I don't.

JULIA:

And Debby?

DUDLEY:

No need to worry about her. She'll be like you, Julia. She'll have youth and beauty no matter how old she lives to be.

JULIA:

[But people do grow old.

DUDLEY:

No, not everybody. Only those who were born old to begin with. You, Julia, were born young. You'll remain that way.]

JULIA:

I wish I could believe you.

DUDLEY:

You may.

JULIA:

You haven't looked at my hand once. I simply don't know what to think of you, Dudley. Whether you're serious-- [or joking.

DUDLEY:

Well, I'm at my most serious when I am joking.

JULIA:

Well, then maybe you should--] Oh, no.

DUDLEY:

Well?

JULIA:

That table over there. No, no, don't look. Three ladies, all on the cathedral committee. They're simply glaring at me.

DUDLEY:

[Really? Well, glare back. ...] Well?

JULIA:

They saw you holding my hand.

DUDLEY:

Oh. (MOVING OFF) Well, then, if you'll excuse me, I'd better do something about it, hadn't I?

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE

MUSIC:

FADE IN RESTAURANT PIANO ... CONTINUES IN BG

JULIA:

(ASTONISHED) What did you do to them? Now they're smiling at me. Look - look, they're waving.

DUDLEY:

Well, wave back, Julia.

JULIA:

Oh, yes.

DUDLEY:

I didn't do anything to them. Just introduced myself, chatted a moment. [Ordered a drink.

JULIA:

(AMAZED) A drink? They took it?

DUDLEY:

Sure. Stingers. ...] They're really very friendly, Julia. They promised to drop by our table a little later.

JULIA:

Dudley, may I make an understatement?

DUDLEY:

Oh, please do.

JULIA:

You are a very unusual man.

DUDLEY:

I'll let you in on something, Julia. You're quite right.

MUSIC:

TO A FINISH

SOUND:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

Before our stars return with Act Two of "The Bishop's Wife," here's Libby Collins, our Hollywood reporter.

LIBBY COLLINS:

John, I have wonderful news for movie fans. Gene Tierney is back in her first picture since her new daughter was born. Twentieth Century-Fox gave her the lead in "Whirlpool," a top-notch thriller. There are a kleptomaniac, a hypnotist, blackmail, and a murder charge in it.

ANNOUNCER:

(WITH A CHUCKLE) Well! Sounds like a real spine-tingler!

LIBBY COLLINS:

Oh, it is. And Gene is wonderful as a wealthy young wife who rebels at living within her husband's income.

ANNOUNCER:

Who is the lucky man?

LIBBY COLLINS:

Richard Conte. But he says he feels a lot safer in man-to-man combat than he does in the love scenes.

ANNOUNCER:

Gene is dynamite on the screen!

LIBBY COLLINS:

And a wonderful wife and mother at home. Between takes for "Whirlpool," she often sewed or knitted for her two little daughters. She loves detailed handwork. And, naturally, when she puts so much time and work into the children's things, she insists they get gentle care. Lux Flakes are a stand-by in her household.

ANNOUNCER:

That's true of thousands of homes where there are babies and young children.

LIBBY COLLINS:

Well, it's especially important to keep their tiny cottons and knitted woolies soft and unshrunken -- so they can't chafe or bind. Tiny Diamonds of Lux burst into suds so fast, make such rich suds, baby things come out sweet and fresh in a jiffy.

ANNOUNCER:

And Lux Flakes are so gentle, they keep delicate baby pastels lovely-looking up to three times as long.

LIBBY COLLINS:

It's a shame to let wrong washing methods spoil baby things. Actual washing tests show that colors stay fresh-looking up to three times as long with Lux Flakes care. There's no safer care for baby things than gentle Lux Flakes.

ANNOUNCER:

We return you now to William Keighley.

KEIGHLEY:

Act Two of "The Bishop's Wife," starring Tyrone Power as Dudley, David Niven as the bishop, and Jane Greer as Julia.

MUSIC:

BRIGHT INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

KEIGHLEY:

Reliable authorities tell us that the Christmas season is the happiest time of the year. But it's anything but that for young Bishop Henry Brougham. Determined to build a cathedral, he can't raise the money. And if that isn't trouble enough, he finds his prayers have been answered in the person of a young, handsome and full-fledged angel named Dudley, who seems to find the bishop's wife, er, better company than the bishop. [X]

SOUND:

TRAFFIC BACKGROUND ... DUDLEY AND JULIA'S FOOTSTEPS ON SIDEWALK

JULIA:

I enjoyed lunch very much, Dudley. Now don't you think we'd better go home?

DUDLEY:

I thought you liked to walk.

JULIA:

Oh, I do. But-- Oh, Dudley, wait. There's a friend of mine. (CALLS) Professor Wutheridge? Professor, wait!

SOUND:

BRISKER FOOTSTEPS TO JOIN PROF ... THEN OUT BEHIND--

PROFESSOR:

(APPROACHES, HAPPY) Julia! What wonderful luck meeting you again. (WARY) This man -- are you with him?

JULIA:

Yes, of course. Dudley, this is Professor Wutheridge.

DUDLEY:

Oh, the professor knows me well. The University of Vienna!

PROFESSOR:

Young man, I don't believe you've ever been near Vienna.

DUDLEY:

[It's a game we play, Julia. He always pretends he's never seen me before.]

JULIA:

Dudley is Henry's new assistant.

PROFESSOR:

You mean you really know this fellow?

JULIA:

Of course I do.

PROFESSOR:

Well, in that case, how about dropping into my humble diggings for a bit of Yuletide cheer?

JULIA:

Oh, I'd love to. But only for a moment.

PROFESSOR:

(MOVING OFF) Come along, Dudley. It's just around the corner.

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE [... THEN PROFESSOR POURS WINE INTO GLASSES

PROFESSOR:

Ah! Just enogh left in the bottle. Here's your glass, Dudley. We'll drink to Julia. (A TOAST) To a charming lady.

DUDLEY:

(AGREES HEARTILY) Ah! To a charming lady.

PROFESSOR:

You've noticed?

DUDLEY:

Yes. Isn't it more remarkable that you had? ...

PROFESSOR:

When you want to know about a woman, ask the old men; they know.]

JULIA:

Well, Professor, when are you gonna show us your book?

PROFESSOR:

My book? Heh! Never.

JULIA:

Please.

DUDLEY:

Oh, you're writing a book?

PROFESSOR:

You didn't know?

DUDLEY:

You didn't tell me.

PROFESSOR:

(TRIUMPHANT) I described the book in detail in the course of those lectures I gave in Vienna. Julia, I'm now certain this fellow's an impostor.

DUDLEY:

Oh! Oh, that book. Oh, I thought you finished that one years ago.

PROFESSOR:

(DEFLATED) Oh. ... Oh, I see. No, no. For twenty years I've talked about that book. But in all that time, I haven't written a word, not one word.

JULIA:

But why not?

PROFESSOR:

'Cause I can't think of anything original to say -- just the same old monotonous history, dry as dust. Never could find the right words, either to tell to a pretty girl or to write a book.

DUDLEY:

Even when you had this coin to inspire you?

JULIA:

Why, that's the coin you gave to Henry, Professor.

DUDLEY:

Yes, I borrowed it from Henry's desk.

PROFESSOR:

You wasted your time. It's worthless.

DUDLEY:

Oh, on the contrary. This coin is one of the rarest of all antiquities. Only one hundred of these coins were minted by Julius Caesar, two thousand years ago. That was when Cleopatra visited Rome. Presumably, these coins were used to pay her hotel bill.

PROFESSOR:

Why, that's amazing.

DUDLEY:

Nobody knew about it, except Caesar's wife and she had the coins destroyed. But this one she overlooked. It's an unwritten chapter in history. And you, Professor, will write it.

PROFESSOR:

Do you know any more stories like that?

DUDLEY:

Oh, any number of them.

PROFESSOR:

Well, you're a curious fellow, Dudley.

JULIA:

Have you just begun to notice that?

PROFESSOR:

Where do you come from?

DUDLEY:

Well, what if I told you that I come from another planet? Would you believe me?

PROFESSOR:

I don't know.

JULIA:

I'd believe you, Dudley.

DUDLEY:

And you'd be right, Julia. As always. We all come from our own little planets. That's why we're all different. That's what makes life interesting.

JULIA:

Oh, it's getting late. I must be leaving, really.

DUDLEY:

Sorry, Professor.

PROFESSOR:

If my wine bottle wasn't empty, we could say goodbye with another drink.

DUDLEY:

Empty?

PROFESSOR:

Yes, I had barely enough for-- (BEAT, MYSTIFIED) The bottle. It's half-full.

DUDLEY:

Oh, save it for next time, Professor.

PROFESSOR:

I'm really getting old when I can't see what's inside a wine bottle. ... Dudley?

DUDLEY:

Yes, my friend?

PROFESSOR:

There's one thing that troubles me greatly.

DUDLEY:

Well?

PROFESSOR:

To write a history is a tremendous task. I wonder -- will I have time to finish it?

DUDLEY:

You'll finish it. You'll have time.

PROFESSOR:

I don't know why I'd ask you that question. How would you know? Yet somehow I believe you. You see, for quite a while now, every time I passed a cemetery, I felt as if I were apartment hunting. ...

JULIA:

Goodbye, Professor. Come and see us, please.

PROFESSOR:

I will. I will. Goodbye and-- God bless you both!

DUDLEY:

I'll pass that recommendation along. ... Thank you, Professor.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

MATILDA:

They're coming up the walk now, Bishop -- Mrs. Brougham and Mr. Dudley.

HENRY:

(GRIM) Oh, they are? Well, I hope dinner isn't spoiled, Matilda.

MATILDA:

Oh, no, sir! (MOVING OFF) I had sort of a feeling they might be late.

HENRY:

Very considerate of you.

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR CLOSES

JULIA:

Henry?

HENRY:

Good evening, Julia.

JULIA:

I'm sorry I'm so late, dear.

DUDLEY:

Hello, Henry.

HENRY:

Good evening, Dudley.

JULIA:

We had the most marvelous time. Oh, I wish you'd been with us.

HENRY:

Yes, I wish I had.

JULIA:

Is Debby asleep yet?

HENRY:

She's waiting to see you.

JULIA:

Oh, good. (MOVING OFF) I'll go right up.

HENRY:

(BEAT) I trust you spent a profitable afternoon, Dudley?

DUDLEY:

Oh, yes, yes. Did you have a profitable afternoon, Henry?

HENRY:

Not very. Dudley, I'd like to see you for a moment. I mean, here in my study.

DUDLEY:

Certainly.

HENRY:

This won't take long, but I - I'd rather not be interrupted. You'll excuse me if I lock the door.

SOUND:

STUDY DOOR SHUT AND LOCKED

HENRY:

Dudley, I simply cannot go on like this. Can you prove to me that you are an angel?

DUDLEY:

Proof? You mean a document? Oh, surely, you of all people should know that angels need no passports.

HENRY:

I'd be a lot happier if I could see you perform a miracle.

DUDLEY:

Well, what kind?

HENRY:

Well, make this desk rise up and fly around the room.

DUDLEY:

Oh, Henry, Henry, please. I didn't come here to do tricks. I'm surprised at you.

HENRY:

I don't believe you are an angel at all. I think you're a demon right out of--

DUDLEY:

Henry, no! No, don't say that word.

HENRY:

Well, anyway, now you know how I feel.

DUDLEY:

(MOVING OFF) Yes.

SOUND:

DUDLEY EXITS, STUDY DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES BEHIND--

HENRY:

Now, wait a minute, Dudley, I'm not through yet. There's another matter, I-- (SHOCKED, TO HIMSELF) The door! I locked that door! (STAMMERS) He just opened it and walked out! (CALLS) Dudley?!

SOUND:

RATTLE OF LOCKED STUDY DOOR

HENRY:

Wait a minute. (CALLS) Dudley?! (TO HIMSELF) Now it's locked again.

SOUND:

HENRY UNLOCKS AND OPENS STUDY DOOR

HENRY:

(CALLS) Dudley?!

JULIA:

He went upstairs, dear -- to say goodnight to Debby.

HENRY:

(AGITATED) Oh. Oh.

JULIA:

Anything wrong?

HENRY:

(STAMMERS) Oh, no. No, no. No, nothing. Oh, you look very well, Julia. Very bright and gay.

JULIA:

I feel gay, Henry.

HENRY:

I think - I think you're an excellent wife, Julia.

JULIA:

Why - why, thank you.

HENRY:

I'm proud of you. I'm proud of the well-ordered life we lead and I want you to know that I think the credit for that is due to you much more than to me.

JULIA:

(PUZZLED) Thank you again, dear.

HENRY:

Do you think I'm an excellent husband?

JULIA:

Of course, dear. Henry, I hope you're going to take things easier now. I mean, with Dudley here. I think he's very able.

HENRY:

You do?

JULIA:

Yes. He knows so many things.

HENRY:

What, for instance?

JULIA:

Well, you should have seen him this afternoon. We met Professor Wutheridge. Why, Dudley knows more about history than he does.

HENRY:

He should. He's been at it longer.

JULIA:

What?

HENRY:

(MOVING OFF) Oh, nothing. I'll drop in to see Debby now, dear.

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE

DEBBY:

Don't you know any stories, Mr. Dudley?

DUDLEY:

Oh, I know hundreds of stories, Debby.

DEBBY:

I think it would be very nice of you to tell me one.

DUDLEY:

Well, I know a story that happened many, many years ago, about a boy who lived in a little town.

DEBBY:

What was his name?

DUDLEY:

His name was David. He was a shepherd and the town where he lived was called Bethlehem.

DEBBY:

Oh, I know Bethlehem. That's where the Star was.

DUDLEY:

That's right. Only David lived long before the Star. Well, one night, David was out in the hills tending his sheep. He was playing the harp and singing, and then all of a sudden, an angel came down and spoke to him.

DEBBY:

How did David know he was an angel?

DUDLEY:

Oh, he didn't know. That's the way it always is. Angels come down and put ideas into people's heads, and then people feel very proud of themselves, because they think it was all their own idea. Well, anyway-- This angel spoke to David. "One of your lambs has strayed," he said. So David put aside his harp and went out into the darkness to find the lamb. Of course, the angel guided him. And when David found the lamb, he saw a great, ferocious lion there.

DEBBY:

(WHISPERS) Oh, dear!

DUDLEY:

So David said to the lion, "You get away from that lamb!" And the lion said, "You get away from me or I'll eat you, too!"

DEBBY:

Did David run away?

DUDLEY:

Oh, no. No, the angel put another idea into his head -- and David took out his sling and hurled a stone right between the lion's eyes!

DEBBY:

Served him good and right!

DUDLEY:

Yes, I think it did. And David picked up the lamb and carried it back to the fold. And then he felt so happy that he took his harp and he made up a new song. It started like this--

MUSIC:

HARP ACCOMPANIMENT, IN BG

DUDLEY:

(RECITES) "The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want.
He maketh me to lie down in green pastures.
He leadeth me beside the still waters.
He--

MUSIC:

CHANGES TO ORCHESTRA ... FOR A WARM FEELING, IN BG

DUDLEY:

(BREAKS OFF RECITATION) Oh, come in, Henry. I think you can tell the rest of this.

HENRY:

(OFF, GENTLY) Uh, some other time.

DEBBY:

Well, good night, Daddy.

HENRY:

Good night, darling. (WITH RESPECT) Now, if you're ready, Dudley, so is dinner.

DUDLEY:

(WARMLY) Thank you, Henry. Thank you.

MUSIC:

FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN FADES GENTLY OUT

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... FADE IN DINNER TABLE BACKGROUND

JULIA:

So right after dinner, Henry, we'll get a taxi and go down to St. Timothy's.

HENRY:

St. Timothy's? Tonight?

JULIA:

Of course, dear. The choir's rehearsing for the benefit. They-- Henry, we promised Mr. Miller we'd--

HENRY:

Oh, Julia, I telephoned Mrs. Hamilton this afternoon.

JULIA:

(APPALLED) Henry!

HENRY:

I apologized to her for some of the things I've said -- I had to -- and she said I might call on her tonight.

JULIA:

But the rehearsal's just for you.

HENRY:

A million dollars from Mrs. Hamilton, dear, is far more important. Besides, Mr. Miller will be delighted to see you.

JULIA:

You're his bishop, Henry. And besides, I just don't like going alone.

DUDLEY:

(HELPFUL) My evening seems quite free, Henry.

HENRY:

Oh, no, no, no, definitely not! You've done enough already.

DUDLEY:

Well, I was about to suggest that I see Mrs. Hamilton and you take Julia to St. Timothy's.

HENRY:

You and Mrs. Hamilton?! Ohhhhh, no.

DUDLEY:

Well, it's just a suggestion.

JULIA:

(QUIETLY DETERMINED) Dudley, would you mind very much going with me?

HENRY:

(APPALLED) Julia!

JULIA:

Yes, Henry? (NO ANSWER) Well?

HENRY:

(WEAKENS, SLOWLY) I think that might be a very good solution. Thank you, Dudley.

DUDLEY:

You're welcome, Henry.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

MILLER:

Mrs. Brougham! Oh, I'm delighted to see you.

JULIA:

Hello, Mr. Miller. Oh, this is Mr. Dudley, the bishop's new assistant.

MILLER:

Oh, Mr. Dudley -- a pleasure.

DUDLEY:

Thank you. The bishop will try to get here later, Mr. Miller. Something important came up.

MILLER:

Oh, of course, he's such a busy man now.

JULIA:

He didn't want to delay rehearsal.

MILLER:

Oh, Mrs. Brougham, I'm terribly embarrassed. Look over there. Only two of the boys have come. Oh, it's just too difficult, I suppose, trying to compete with basketball and Christmas.

DUDLEY:

I wouldn't worry, Mr. Miller. They'll all show up. (CALLS, CHEERFUL) Hiya, boys!

TWO BOYS:

Hi!

DUDLEY:

What do you sing?

BOBBY:

Me? Uh, first soprano.

DUDLEY:

Any good?

BOBBY:

I doubt it.

DUDLEY:

Well, how 'bout giving out?

BOBBY:

You - you mean alone?

DUDLEY:

Well, you've got Rupert with you. Hiya, Rupert.

RUPERT:

Hi.

DUDLEY:

Well, what do you say?

RUPERT:

It's okay by me.

DUDLEY:

Fine. I'll start you off at the piano.

MUSIC:

"AWAY IN THE MANGER" PIANO ACCOMPANIMENT FOR THE BOYS ... FADES OUT BEHIND--

BOYS:

(SINGING, HIGH VOICES) Away in the manger,
No crib for His bed ... (ET CETERA)
(SINGING CONTINUES IN BG, WITH MORE BOYS SLOWLY JOINING IN, BUILDING TO A FULL CHOIR)

MILLER:

Mrs. Brougham, look. Here come some of the other boys.

JULIA:

Why - why, yes. Maybe basketball isn't so important after all.

DUDLEY:

(LONG PAUSE) You can be proud of them, Mr. Miller. They sing beautifully.

MILLER:

(AMAZED) They've never sung so well. Never. And look. They're all here now. I don't understand.

JULIA:

Oh, if Henry could hear this. Like - like angels.

DUDLEY:

Better. Believe me. ...

BOYS:

(CONTINUE SINGING FOR A MOMENT, THEN FADE OUT)

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE

MRS. HAMILTON:

I'm so relieved, Bishop Brougham. You needn't make any further apologies.

HENRY:

Oh, thank you, Mrs. Hamilton. And, in view of your generosity, the George B. Hamilton Memorial Chapel shall be located wherever you specify in the new cathedral.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Well, now we're getting somewhere, aren't we? Oh, there's another matter -- that window depicting St. George and the dragon.

HENRY:

Yes?

MRS. HAMILTON:

I should very much like the countenance of St. George to resemble my late husband. ...

HENRY:

Oh. Uh, who do you see as the dragon?

MRS. HAMILTON:

Oh. ... Oh, any [old] dragon.

HENRY:

Thank you. Well, now that we're in such complete accord, would you mind very much if we postponed the details? Julia's waiting for me at St. Timothy's.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Very well. We can go over the plans when I transfer the funds.

HENRY:

Thank you so much. I--

SOUND:

THUMP! OF CHAIR ON FLOOR WHEN HENRY TRIES TO RISE ... HE IS STUCK TO THE CHAIR

HENRY:

Well! That's strange.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Is anything the matter?

SOUND:

MORE THUMPS! AS HENRY STRUGGLES TO FREE HIMSELF, BEHIND--

HENRY:

Well, this chair. I can't get up. It's stuck to my-- I mean, I'm stuck to it. ...

MRS. HAMILTON:

Stuck to the chair?

HENRY:

Yes, it doesn't seem quite right, does it?

MRS. HAMILTON:

(CALLS) Stevens? Stevens, come here, please!

STEVENS:

Yes, madame?

MRS. HAMILTON:

There is something wrong with the bishop's chair.

STEVENS:

(DISMAYED) Oh, madame -- it must be the new varnish. The furniture people should have warned us.

HENRY:

I do hope I'm not harming the chair.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Oh, this is preposterous.

HENRY:

Awkward situation, isn't it? Uh, perhaps you'll give a little pull at the back, Stevens?

STEVENS:

Yes, sir. (GRUNTS WITH EFFORT)

SOUND:

HENRY AND STEVENS STRUGGLE WITH THE CHAIR

HENRY:

Again, please.

SOUND:

MORE STRUGGLING

STEVENS:

Your trousers, sir-- I'm afraid if we pull any more--

HENRY:

Mrs. Hamilton, might I use the telephone?

MRS. HAMILTON:

Yes, of course. It's right over there. Can you walk?

SOUND:

THUMPETY-THUMPETY! AS HENRY WALKS TO THE PHONE, DRAGGING THE CHAIR BEHIND HIM

HENRY:

After a fashion. ...

SOUND:

HENRY PICKS UP RECEIVER AND DIALS PHONE, BEHIND--

STEVENS:

That chair, madame-- It clings to him like a brother.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Well, do something, Stevens. Call the shop, get a plumber--

HENRY:

(INTO PHONE) Hello? Matilda, this is Bishop Brougham. I'm at Mrs. Hamilton's. I want you to come here at once with another pair of trousers. (BEAT) Hmm? Well, what difference does it make? Just bring me another pair of trousers. Thank you.

SOUND:

RECEIVER DOWN

MRS. HAMILTON:

I'm so sorry this has happened.

HENRY:

Oh, if I could only get in touch with Julia, or Dudley or-- (REALIZES) Dudley! This is all his doing! Dudley--

MRS. HAMILTON:

Now, now, now, Bishop, don't be nervous. Uh, have a chair, Bishop. ...

HENRY:

I have a chair.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

SOUND:

TAXI BACKGROUND, AS CAB RUMBLES DOWN THE ROAD

JULIA:

I can't imagine what happened to Henry. He was so sure he'd meet us there.

DUDLEY:

Well, I-- Well, I suppose he's detained at Mrs. Hamilton's.

JULIA:

Oh. Of course. You know, Dudley, it's a strange thing. You seem to be able to make me feel as if everything's going to be all right.

DUDLEY:

Everything could be all right for everyone, Julia, if people would only learn to behave like human beings.

JULIA:

It's a lovely night, isn't it? (TO SYLVESTER) Oh, driver? Could you take us through the park, please?

SYLVESTER:

But that's out of your way, lady.

DUDLEY:

You getting bored with us, driver?

SYLVESTER:

Say, I'll drive you by way of Mexico City if you want me to. That's the trouble with this country -- too many people who don't know where they're going and they want to get there too fast. I'd call you two very unusual people.

DUDLEY:

Oh, thank you. You're very perceptive.

SYLVESTER:

You know your destination, but you're in no hurry to get there. And you're not reluctant to invest an extra four bits for a detour with Mother Nature--

SOUND:

BRAKES SQUEAL, TIRES SCREECH ... NEAR COLLISION WITH TRUCK

SYLVESTER:

(YELLS) You crazy or somethin'?! Look where you're goin'!

JULIA:

(UNNERVED) Ohhh! Oh, that was really a close one.

SYLVESTER:

Holy smoke! Did you see the way I missed that truck? Like - like a miracle.

DUDLEY:

Yes, I know, but, er, just don't overplay your hand. ...

SYLVESTER:

Hey! Hey, look! They're ice skatin' over there!

DUDLEY:

Well, so they are. Julia, we're going ice skating.

JULIA:

(CONFLICTED) Oh, no. No, we mustn't. It's too late. We couldn't. Do you really think we could?

DUDLEY:

(TO SYLVESTER) You can stop here, driver. We're going ice skating. Oh, uh, you, too.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

SOUND:

TAXI PULLS TO A STOP, THEN IDLES IN BG ... [CAB DOOR OPENS]

DUDLEY:

Well, this is it, Sylvester. What do I owe you?

SYLVESTER:

Not a cent, my friend. Want to know why? Because you and the little lady here have restored my faith in human nature. Well, good night, Dudley. Good night, Julia.

JULIA:

Goodnight, Sylvester.

SOUND:

[CAB DOOR SHUTS ...] TAXI DRIVES OFF ... DUDLEY AND JULIA WALK TO FRONT DOOR, IN BG

DUDLEY:

Sylvester is a noble soul. His children and his children's children will rise up and call him blessèd.

JULIA:

Oh, this has been the most wonderful evening I've had in years.

DUDLEY:

It's the most wonderful evening I've had in centuries. You're a beautiful skater, Julia. In fact, you're beautiful.

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR OPENS

HENRY:

(GRIM) Well! Well, you've come home.

DUDLEY:

Oh, hello, Henry.

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR CLOSES

JULIA:

Henry, what happened to you? I thought you were going to meet us at St. Timothy's.

HENRY:

What happened to you? It's almost ten o'clock.

JULIA:

You'll never guess, Henry. We've been ice skating!

HENRY:

Ice skating?!

JULIA:

Yes! You should have seen Dudley. He's marvelous, Henry! Oh, and those boys at St. Timothy's -- the way they sang. It was simply heavenly!

HENRY:

I'm sure it was.

DUDLEY:

Did you have a successful meeting with Mrs. Hamilton?

HENRY:

Quite satisfactory, thank you.

JULIA:

Good! (MOVING OFF) I'll be right down, Henry.

HENRY:

Dudley?

DUDLEY:

Yes, Henry?

HENRY:

Whatever went on in these last few hours, there's one thing I'm sure of -- Julia is absolutely blameless.

DUDLEY:

Of course she is.

HENRY:

But, you! You deliberately stopped me from joining you -- by the seat of my pants! ...

DUDLEY:

[Well, now, Julia had a very good time.

HENRY:

But I did not.]

DUDLEY:

Henry, if you had sent me to represent you with Mrs. Hamilton, I would have gone. But you didn't, so I represented you with your wife.

HENRY:

Oh, is that part of the normal duties of a-- Of an angel?

DUDLEY:

Sometimes, Henry, angels must rush in where fools fear to tread. ...

HENRY:

I haven't the faintest idea what that means, and I don't want it explained to me. In any event, you can go now, Dudley. I have solved my problem. Mrs. Hamilton is giving the money for the cathedral.

DUDLEY:

But that was a foregone conclusion -- providing you were willing to make a slight sacrifice of your principles.

HENRY:

Don't you think it's worth it for this -- this glorious edifice?

DUDLEY:

I'm not so sure of its glory at a time like this.

HENRY:

Oh, you're not?

DUDLEY:

No, these are rather lean years for the world, Henry. So many people need food, so many need shelter. That big roof could make so many little roofs.

HENRY:

I'm dealing with a materialistic, selfish woman! She wouldn't listen to talk like that!

DUDLEY:

Did you try?

HENRY:

You came here so that I could have a cathedral. Well, I've got a cathedral, and I want you to get out of my house, and out of my life, and away from Julia!

DUDLEY:

Suppose you pray for that, Henry? After all, it was prayer that brought me here.

HENRY:

Very well. I'll pray.

DUDLEY:

(PAUSE, WARNING) Uh, uh, uh, uh-- (ADMONISHES) Henry! I'm afraid that's no prayer. ...

HENRY:

It was right from my heart. I want you to go!

DUDLEY:

Julia doesn't.

HENRY:

Julia?! Get out! Get out!

DUDLEY:

Julia is about to come down those stairs. (MOVING OFF) Don't let her see you like this, Henry. Try to calm yourself.

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS AS DUDLEY EXITS ... JULIA'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH

JULIA:

(COMING IN) Dudley?

HENRY:

(INCREASINGLY AGITATED) He's gone.

JULIA:

Oh. Debby's awake. She wants to say goodnight to him.

HENRY:

I just told you Dudley is gone!

JULIA:

But where?

HENRY:

How should I know?!

JULIA:

But why did he leave so suddenly?

HENRY:

Because I got rid of him! I told him to go away! I fired him!

JULIA:

Why?!

HENRY:

Because he's incompetent, he's no good at his job, and I cannot stand the sight of him!

JULIA:

Henry!

HENRY:

Believe me, Julia, I know what I am doing!

MUSIC:

TO A FINISH

SOUND:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

We pause now for station identification. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.

MUSIC:

FOR A STATION BREAK ... THEN OUT

KEIGHLEY:

After a brief intermission, our stars will return with Act Three of "The Bishop's Wife." Our special guest tonight is the well-known dress designer of the Samuel Goldwyn studios, Mary Wills, who's responsible for many of the stunning fashions we see on the screen. What was your latest assignment, Mary?

MARY WILLS:

"My Foolish Heart," for Mr. Goldwyn. And that picture fascinated me so, I hated to see them finish it.

KEIGHLEY:

You know, Susan Hayward is splendid in the highly emotional role of a woman who gives everything for love.

MARY WILLS:

And Dana Andrews, as the man in her life, was never better. He's one of my favorites.

KEIGHLEY:

Yes, their tender love scenes are beautifully done.

MARY WILLS:

Miss Hayward took a great interest in the details of her costumes for "My Foolish Heart," especially stockings. She insisted they be very sheer and fit perfectly. And she always insists on Lux Flakes to keep them that way, Mr. Kennedy.

ANNOUNCER:

These Tiny Diamonds of Lux are the favorite stocking care of a great many stars.

MARY WILLS:

We always use them at the studio. They "suds" wonderfully fast and freshen nylons in a hurry. Besides, we find stockings last much longer.

ANNOUNCER:

That's been proved by scientific strain tests. Identical stockings rubbed with cake soap, or washed with a strong soap, went into runs much sooner than those washed with Lux Flakes. The Lux stockings lasted twice as long.

MARY WILLS:

Miss Hayward likes to choose a single stocking shade that blends with a variety of costumes and then orders it in quantity.

ANNOUNCER:

A thrifty idea for a girl on a budget. If one pair is damaged, the odd stocking can always be matched. Lux Flakes keep colors truer; make stockings last longer, too. No wonder over ninety percent of the makers of stockings recommend Lux Flakes. (BEAT) Here's our producer, Mr. William Keighley.

KEIGHLEY:

The curtain rises on the third act of "The Bishop's Wife," starring Tyrone Power as Dudley, David Niven as the bishop, and Jane Greer as Julia.

MUSIC:

INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

KEIGHLEY:

Two days have passed since Dudley disappeared, much to the relief of Bishop Henry Brougham, and now it's early evening on Christmas Eve. [X]

MISS CASSAWAY:

Here's the list of your calls, Bishop, ending at Mrs. Hamilton's. Oh, and there's a taxi waiting for you outside.

HENRY:

Thank you, Miss Cassaway. If you're through typing my sermon before I'm back, just leave the copies on my desk.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Yes, sir.

HENRY:

I'm sorry to keep you so late on Christmas Eve.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Oh, it's all right, sir. Bishop Brougham?

HENRY:

Yes?

MISS CASSAWAY:

There's - still no word from Mr. Dudley.

HENRY:

Miss Cassaway, I discharged Mr. Dudley. There's no reason at all to hear from him.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Yes, sir.

HENRY:

Now, if you don't mind, please tell Mrs. Brougham that the taxi is waiting. (FADES OUT)

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... HENRY AND JULIA'S FOOTSTEPS TO THE TAXI CAB

HENRY:

We can go to the Tropshores' first, Henry, then the Vandovers'--

SYLVESTER:

(HAPPY) Julia! Hiya, Julia!

JULIA:

(WARMLY) Sylvester! Well, what are you doing here?

SYLVESTER:

Well, when the call came in for a cab, I sure high-tailed it over here! I was hopin' there'd be another skatin' party! Hey, uh, where's Dudley?

JULIA:

I don't know.

SYLVESTER:

Look! You got a preacher with ya!

JULIA:

Yes, uh, this is--

SYLVESTER:

Don't - don't tell me! A weddin'! You and Dudley! ...

JULIA:

Sylvester, this is my husband, Bishop Brougham.

HENRY:

(DOUR) How do you do?

SYLVESTER:

(EMBARRASSED) Ohhhh. ...

HENRY:

And now, if you don't mind, we'd like to go to North Maple Street; by taxicab, Sylvester -- not ice skates.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

SOUND:

CLACK-CLACK-CLACK! OF TYPEWRITER ... OUT ABRUPTLY AT [X]

DUDLEY:

Good evening, Miss Cassaway.

MISS CASSAWAY:

(STARTLED) Oh! [X] Mr. Dudley!

DUDLEY:

Did I startle you?

MISS CASSAWAY:

Oh, yes. I - I didn't hear you come in. But where have you been?

DUDLEY:

Oh, here and there, Miss Cassaway.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Why, we've been so worried about you. And poor Mrs. Brougham; she's been popping in and out of here all day -- have I seen you? Have I heard from you?

DUDLEY:

Where is she?

MISS CASSAWAY:

She and the bishop are making Christmas calls.

DUDLEY:

Oh, they'll be home?

MISS CASSAWAY:

Oh, yes, sir -- after Mrs. Hamilton's. Then they go to St. Timothy's for the midnight service.

DUDLEY:

You should be home, too, Miss Cassaway. I'll type that sermon for you.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Oh, no, don't. The bishop told me--

DUDLEY:

It's Christmas Eve. You should be with your family.

MISS CASSAWAY:

Well, if you really-- (WARMLY) Oh, thank you, Mr. Dudley.

DUDLEY:

(DELIBERATELY) Merry Christmas, Mildred.

MISS CASSAWAY:

(IMPRESSED) Merry Christmas, Dudley.

SOUND:

STUDY DOOR SHUTS

DUDLEY:

(TO HIMSELF) [Now, let's get a load of this.] Hm. Henry's Christmas sermon, hm? (READS) "A new cathedral--" "Mrs. Hamilton's magnificent gesture--" "Money--" "Pledges needed--"

SOUND:

PAPER RIPPED OUT OF TYPEWRITER ... TORN UP, BEHIND--

DUDLEY:

(CHUCKLES) Sorry, Henry, but that's no sermon for Christmas.

SOUND:

NEW SHEET OF PAPER INSERTED INTO TYPEWRITER, BEHIND--

DUDLEY:

Suppose you tell them-- Suppose you tell them the story of an empty stocking.

SOUND:

CLACK-CLACK-CLACK! OF TYPEWRITER ... THEN IN BG

MUSIC:

FOR COMPOSING A CHRISTMAS SERMON ... THEN IN BG

DUDLEY:

Once upon a midnight clear, there was a child's cry. A blazing star hung over a stable, and wise men came with birthday gifts. We have forgotten many things during the centuries, but not that night-- (FADES OUT)

MUSIC:

TOPS THE SCENE, THEN FADES

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE

STEVENS:

Whom did you say is calling, sir?

DUDLEY:

Oh, I'm Dudley, Stevens -- Bishop Brougham's new assistant. Would you mind telling Mrs. Hamilton I'm here?

STEVENS:

I don't believe she's expecting you, sir.

DUDLEY:

Oh, I'm sure she isn't.

STEVENS:

(CLEARS THROAT) Yes, sir.

DUDLEY:

I'll wait in the music room.

STEVENS:

The music room, sir?

DUDLEY:

Yes, there's a harp in there. I wonder if she'd mind if I--

STEVENS:

Oh, I'm afraid she would, sir.

DUDLEY:

Oh. Well, in that event, you'd better hurry off and tell her.

STEVENS:

Yes, sir. I shall. (FADES OUT)

SOUND:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE

MUSIC:

HARP ... DUDLEY PLAYS A LOVELY ORIGINAL PIECE ... CONTINUES IN BG, OUT GENTLY AT [X]

MRS. HAMILTON:

(ASTONISHED) Who are you?

DUDLEY:

Oh, good evening, Mrs. Hamilton. This is a beautiful harp you have.

MRS. HAMILTON:

My butler said you told him you're Bishop Brougham's assistant.

DUDLEY:

Oh, yes, Mrs. Hamilton. The bishop will be along a little later.

MRS. HAMILTON:

(SHAKEN) That music you're playing--

DUDLEY:

I thought you'd recognize it.

MRS. HAMILTON:

(VERY SERIOUS) There's no one living who knows that composition. [X] Except me. (WEEPS BRIEFLY, IN BG)

DUDLEY:

What a shame that Allan Cartright died -- that only you and I would know his music.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Allan Cartright died nearly forty years ago. You couldn't have known him.

DUDLEY:

I'm - much older than you think. Mrs. Hamilton, tell me about him. About Allan Cartright.

MRS. HAMILTON:

(SLOWLY) What is there to tell? He was the only man I ever loved. But I was afraid of poverty, so he went away and I never saw him again. Why am I telling you this?

DUDLEY:

And so you married the rich George Hamilton.

MRS. HAMILTON:

I made George happy, I think. And since he died, I've spent a fortune honoring his memory. In empty monuments.

DUDLEY:

[Oh, they're no more empty than your own life, Mrs. Hamilton. Since you sent the man you loved away, you haven't allowed yourself to love anyone else. You've withdrawn into a shell -- a cold and, alas, selfish woman.

MRS. HAMILTON:

But - what can I do?

DUDLEY:

Well, I'll tell you what you can do. Break that shell. Now, think of what you could do for others. And you'll no longer have time to think of yourself. Forgive yourself, Mrs. Hamilton, as Allan Cartright forgave you long ago.]

MRS. HAMILTON:

Do you really think he did?

DUDLEY:

I know he did.

MRS. HAMILTON:

(RELIEVED)] (TEARFUL) How did you know about Allan Cartright?

DUDLEY:

It doesn't matter. Mrs. Hamilton, they're at the front door now -- Henry and Julia.

MRS. HAMILTON:

(SOBBING) I can't see them now. I can't.

DUDLEY:

Yes. Yes, you'll see them. You'll go to the hall and you'll greet them in your usual warm hearted manner.

MRS. HAMILTON:

(DESPERATE) You'll come with me. And you'll stay, won't you, Dudley?

DUDLEY:

No. No, I'm afraid I can't. I have a great deal of work to do.

STEVENS:

(OFF) Bishop and Mrs. Brougham are here, madame.

DUDLEY:

Now, don't keep them waiting.

JULIA:

(APPROACHES, POLITE) How do you do, Mrs. Hamilton?

MRS. HAMILTON:

(WARMLY) Julia! How nice of you to come and see me. And Henry! Merry Christmas. (NO RESPONSE) Henry, I said, "Merry Christmas."

HENRY:

(SURPRISED BY HER WARMTH) Oh, yes, merry Christmas, Mrs. Hamilton.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Oh, and no more of this "Mrs. Hamilton" business. My name is Agnes. And now we can all-- (DISAPPOINTED) Oh. He's gone. He's gone already.

JULIA:

Gone? Who?

MRS. HAMILTON:

Dudley!

JULIA:

He was here?

HENRY:

(GRIM) I might have known it. ...

JULIA:

But where did he go?

MRS. HAMILTON:

Oh. Oh, that poor man. He said he had so much work to do. Really, Henry, you must make him take some rest.

HENRY:

I've been trying to make him do just that.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Oh, I can't thank you enough for sending him to me. Meeting Dudley-- Oh, I know it sounds ridiculous, but-- Meeting him has been the greatest spiritual experience of my life. How did you ever find him, Henry?

HENRY:

More or less of an accident, I suppose.

JULIA:

Or more or less of a miracle.

MRS. HAMILTON:

Oh, it was. It was! Talking with this wonderful, understanding man has-- has-- (DECISIVE) Henry, I've suddenly changed my mind about the cathedral.

HENRY:

You have?

MRS. HAMILTON:

Yes. I'm going to give my money to those who need it. To the poor, the homeless, the unappreciated. And I want you to direct the spending of it.

JULIA:

(PLEASED) Now you see what Dudley's done, Henry?

HENRY:

Yes, I - I see.

JULIA:

And you understand?

HENRY:

(CURT) Mrs. Hamilton. Julia. Forgive me, but I have to leave. (MOVING OFF) There's someone I must see immediately.

JULIA:

(CONFUSED) Henry?

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

PROFESSOR:

Henry! My dear fellow, sit down, sit down.

HENRY:

Professor Wutheridge, I - I just had to see you.

PROFESSOR:

I'm delighted. Here, here, Henry, here. A glass of sherry.

HENRY:

No. No, thank you.

PROFESSOR:

Oh, but I insist.

SOUND:

OPENS BOTTLE, POURS TWO GLASSES, BEHIND--

PROFESSOR:

Henry, you see this bottle? Now watch. I fill two glasses. Behold -- the bottle is still half-full. And what's more -- the sherry itself; it stimulates, it warms, it inspires -- but no matter how much you drink, it never inebriates, and the contents never diminish; always half-full.

HENRY:

(WEAKLY) Dudley's been here?

PROFESSOR:

Yes. ... And that bottle isn't all. He told me to look up some ancient texts in the library which no living scholar has ever been able to decipher. I read them as if they were English. Oh, let's face it, Henry. This Dudley fellow is not like the rest of us.

HENRY:

He says he's an angel.

PROFESSOR:

An angel?

HENRY:

That's funny. Nothing stopped me from saying it that time. (REPEATS, TO BE SURE) "Angel." "He says he's an angel."

PROFESSOR:

From - from Heaven?

HENRY:

That I'm not so sure about. ...

PROFESSOR:

An angel! It's too bad; he's such a nice fellow. ...

HENRY:

Oh, he's brought nothing but disaster to me.

PROFESSOR:

(SCOFFS) That's absurd. He and Julia were here the other day. She seemed happier than she'd been in years.

HENRY:

He's made her despise me.

PROFESSOR:

Are you sure?

HENRY:

That's why I've come to see you. Do you think it's all my own fault, Professor? You don't have to answer. I asked for this, in more ways than one. I suppose that Dudley came to me just to confirm that I had already lost Julia's love.

PROFESSOR:

Well, if there's anything I can do, Henry--

HENRY:

There's nothing anyone can do.

PROFESSOR:

But there must be! You and Julia love each other. You always have.

HENRY:

It's only partly true. I love Julia.

PROFESSOR:

Well, then why don't you fight for her?

HENRY:

Fight? How can I fight against--?

PROFESSOR:

But you have a tremendous advantage over him.

HENRY:

Advantage? Over an angel?

PROFESSOR:

Precisely. He is an angel. Julia's a creature of earth. She's a woman, Henry. And you're a man!

HENRY:

Yes. Yes, I am. ...

PROFESSOR:

If I were you, I'd get myself home and--

HENRY:

Home! That's where he'll be! Waiting for Julia! Excuse me. (MOVES OFF, STAMMERS) Uh, happy Christmas.

MUSIC:

TRANSITION

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR CLOSES

JULIA:

Henry? Is that you, dear?

DUDLEY:

Hello, Julia.

JULIA:

Dudley--?

DUDLEY:

I came to say goodbye. I have to be moving along.

JULIA:

Oh. Well, where will you be going?

DUDLEY:

Wherever they send me.

JULIA:

"They"?

DUDLEY:

My superior officers.

JULIA:

Will we ever see you again?

DUDLEY:

They seldom send us twice to the same place, Julia. We might form attachments.

JULIA:

I don't know what you're talking about.

DUDLEY:

No, of course not. Julia--? Julia, I don't want to leave.

JULIA:

Why?

DUDLEY:

Well, there are few people who know the secret of making heaven here on earth. And you are one of those rare people.

MUSIC:

UNEASY, INCREASINGLY TURBULENT ... IN BG

JULIA:

You - you frighten me. Dudley, I think you ought to go.

DUDLEY:

Julia, please -- don't send me away.

JULIA:

What are you saying?

DUDLEY:

That I'm - I'm tired of being a wanderer. I'm tired of an existence which is neither hot nor cold, hungry nor full--

JULIA:

No. No, you must go away. And never come back. Don't - look at me like that. Dudley-- No!

SOUND:

FRONT DOOR SLAMS

JULIA:

(CRIES OUT) Henry?! Henry?!

MUSIC:

MUSIC OUT

HENRY:

It's all right, Julia! It's all right, my darling. Go upstairs, dear; I'll handle this alone. (BEAT, AS SHE EXITS) As for you, Dudley, I have never before had to fight an angel. But I suggest you take off your coat and put up your dukes. ...

DUDLEY:

Now, why do you want to fight me, Henry?

HENRY:

Because you're a thief -- trying to steal the love that belongs to me.

DUDLEY:

Henry, do you realize that, as an angel, I could quite possibly destroy you with a bolt of lightning?

HENRY:

I don't care. Julia means more to me than my life. I'm not gonna lose her.

DUDLEY:

Ah! Then, I have news for you. I'm going.

HENRY:

I'll accept that as a fact when I see it happen.

DUDLEY:

Oh, no, you won't. Because when I'm gone, you will never know that an angel visited this house.

HENRY:

And Julia? What about her?

DUDLEY:

There will be no memory with her, either. Or with Debby, or the Professor, or anyone else.

HENRY:

(SKEPTICAL) Oh, I don't trust you.

DUDLEY:

You may, Henry -- because your prayer's been answered.

HENRY:

That's not true! I prayed for a cathedral.

DUDLEY:

No, no, Henry. You prayed for guidance. And that's been given to you.

CHOIR:

(HEAVENLY ANGEL VOICES SING) Duuuuud-leeeeeeey!

DUDLEY:

(MATTER-OF-FACT, TO HENRY) I'm being paged. (CALLS) Uh, just a minute, please! ... (WARMLY) Goodbye, Henry.

HENRY:

(SLOWLY) If - if we should need you again, will you come back?

DUDLEY:

Not I. I'm requesting an assignment at the other end of the universe.

HENRY:

Is that because I was so difficult?

DUDLEY:

Oh, no. No, no. This difficulty was in me. When an immortal finds himself envying the mortal trusted to his care, it's a definite signal of danger.

CHOIR:

(ANGEL VOICES SING, IMPATIENT) Dud-ley!

DUDLEY:

(CALLS) Yes, yes! I heard you the first time! ... (QUIET, TO HENRY) Now - now go upstairs. Take her in your arms, Henry. And kiss her for me. You lucky Henry.

MUSIC:

BRIEF TRANSITION ... CONTINUES WARMLY IN BG

HENRY:

Julia?! Julia?!

JULIA:

(GENTLY) Quiet, darling. You'll wake Debby up.

HENRY:

Are you all right?

JULIA:

Why, yes, of course I am. Henry, did you get that for Debby?

HENRY:

Get what for Debby?

JULIA:

That little angel there on her bed.

HENRY:

Why, no.

JULIA:

I can't imagine where it came from.

MUSIC:

DISTANT CHURCH BELLS CHIME GENTLY ... CONTINUE IN BG

JULIA:

Henry? Henry, what is it?

HENRY:

I don't know. I - I have the most inexplicable feeling of happiness.

JULIA:

Why, so do I.

HENRY:

Oh, Julia; I love you, Julia.

JULIA:

I love you, Henry. Listen. The bells from St. Timothy's.

HENRY:

It's almost midnight.

JULIA:

You'll have to hurry.

HENRY:

(REALIZES) Oh, my sermon. It was all about the cathedral. It will never do now.

JULIA:

Don't worry, dear. You'll think of something. Something even better. Merry Christmas, Henry.

HENRY:

Merry Christmas, darling.

MUSIC:

UP, FOR A TRANSITION ... CHANGES TO ORGAN ... "HARK! THE HERALD ANGELS SING"

BOYS:

(SING THE CONCLUSION) Hark! The herald angels sing
Glory to the newborn King!

MUSIC:

OUT

HENRY:

(SLIGHT ECHO, SLIGHTLY OFF, DELIVERS SERMON) Tonight, I want to tell you the story of an empty stocking. Once upon a midnight clear, there was a child's cry. A blazing star hung over a stable and wise men came with birthday gifts. We have forgotten many things through the centuries, but not that night. We celebrate it with stars on Christmas trees, with the sound of bells, and with gifts. But especially with gifts. You give me a book, I give you a tie. Aunt Martha has always wanted an orange squeezer, and Uncle Harry could do with a new pipe. Oh, we forget nobody. Adult or child, all the stockings are filled. All, that is, except one. And we have even forgotten to hang it up.

MUSIC:

SPIRITUAL ... CONTINUES IN BG, TO FINISH

HENRY:

The stocking for the Child born in a manger. It is His birthday we're celebrating. Don't let us ever forget that. Let us ask ourselves what He would wish for most. And then let each put in his share. Loving kindness, warm hearts, and a stretched-out hand of tolerance -- all the shining gifts to make a Peace-On-Earth.

DUDLEY:

(OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE) --stretched-out hand of tolerance -- all the shining gifts to make a Peace-On-Earth.

MUSIC:

UP ... TO A FINISH

SOUND:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

Our stars will return for their curtain calls in a moment. Libby, since you gave your prize recipe last week for making Christmas Snow, we've been swamped with letters asking us to repeat it.

LIBBY COLLINS:

(CHUCKLES) Well, I'm not a bit surprised, John. It's such a novel decoration for a Christmas tree. The branches look as if they were covered with freshly-formed snow.

ANNOUNCER:

The kids especially have asked about it. You said it was easy.

LIBBY COLLINS:

Oh, it is. They can do it without any help from grown-ups. Just add two cups of lukewarm water to a large box of Lux Flakes. Whip with an egg beater until it's the consistency of thick whipped cream. Then, spread the mixture on the tree branches with your fingertips. It dries in about an hour.

ANNOUNCER:

And it lasts as long as the tree. When it's dry, add your lights and ornaments, as usual.

LIBBY COLLINS:

You can use fewer ornaments, though, because Lux Christmas Snow is a decoration in itself. And so inexpensive. Lux Flakes is another fine product of Lever Brothers.

ANNOUNCER:

Better order some extra boxes of Lux Flakes tomorrow. You'll want to try Christmas Snow on your table centerpieces, too, and on holly wreathes around the house. Your dealer has printed directions for making Lux Christmas Snow. Remember, just two cups of water to one large box of Lux Flakes. Now, here's Mr. Keighley with our stars.

KEIGHLEY:

Our most sincere thanks are due our stars for the joy they brought to this audience tonight. And here they are -- Tyrone Power, David Niven and Jane Greer.

SOUND:

APPLAUSE

KEIGHLEY:

Ty, it's good to have you back in Hollywood after all these months.

POWER:

Well, until you-- Until you-- Well, I'll try this again. Once more. ... Until you've been away a year and a half, you never know how good home looks. You know, I was just figuring up the other day. In the last four years, I've only been here ten months.

NIVEN:

Well, I guess you're-- Guess you're -- ready to settle down. ...

POWER:

Well, for a - for a few days, David. And then Linda and I are going down to Mexico City to spend New Year's with her family.

GREER:

You travel as much in real life as in "The Prince of Foxes."

NIVEN:

Twentieth Century-Fox's, that is.

KEIGHLEY:

(CHUCKLES)

POWER:

Nice to know you haven't changed a bit, David.

KEIGHLEY:

Well, Ty, you certainly had an exciting role in the picture and your performance merits our congratulations. And this would be a good time to congratulate Jane on the recent arrival in her family. Two boys must be a houseful, Jane.

GREER:

Oh, two aren't nearly enough. But I will say the Lux Flakes consumption is running rather high.

KEIGHLEY:

Well, we certainly can help you out there. There's some in the wings for all of you to take home.

NIVEN:

We appreciate it, Bill. Now, what about next week's play?

KEIGHLEY:

It's a gay musical, David -- the Warner Brothers hit, "My Dream Is Yours." And the stars will be June Haver and Jack Carson. "My Dream Is Yours" is a delightful love story, full of sparkling songs in just the right mood to top off the Christmas season.

POWER:

That's a wonderful holiday play. Well, good night.

NIVEN:

Good night.

GREER:

Good night.

KEIGHLEY:

Good night.

SOUND:

APPLAUSE

MUSIC:

ORGAN ... "O LITTLE TOWN OF BETHLEHEM" ... THEN IN BG

KEIGHLEY:

Traditionally, this is the time for an old American custom -- going home for Christmas. It's a time of joyful reunion, a time to strengthen the ties that bind each family together. And in the family is our only hope for the future. For, from deep in our hearts and our homes, must come the fulfillment of the age-old promise of Christmas -- the promise of peace on earth and good will among men. All men.

MUSIC:

ORGAN ... FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG

KEIGHLEY:

On behalf of Lever Brothers Company and of us in the Lux Radio Theatre, may I wish all of you the happiest of holidays.

MUSIC:

ORGAN, TO A FINISH ... THEN ORCHESTRA PLAYS LUX THEME ... CONTINUES IN BG

KEIGHLEY:

And we invite you all to join us again next Monday evening when the Lux Radio Theatre presents Jack Carson and June Haver in "My Dream Is Yours." This is William Keighley saying, "Goodnight to you, and merry Christmas."

SOUND:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

David Niven will soon be seen in the Alexander Korda production, "The Elusive Pimpernel." Jane Greer appeared through the courtesy of RKO, producers of "Holiday Affair," starring Robert Mitchum and Janet Leigh.

Heard in tonight's cast were Willard Waterman as Professor, Eleanor Audley as Mrs. Hamilton, Frances Robinson as Miss Cassaway, and Bill Johnstone, Gilbert Barnett, Philip Tead, Noreen Gammill, Anne Whitfield, Howard McNear, Eddie Marr, and Alan Reed, Jr.

Our play was adapted by S. H. Barnett and our music was directed by Louis Silvers.

This is your announcer, John Milton Kennedy, reminding you to join us again next Monday night to hear "My Dream Is Yours," starring June Haver and Jack Carson.

SOUND:

APPLAUSE

MUSIC:

FADES OUT

ANNOUNCER:

Screen stars are thrilled with the new bath-size Lux Toilet Soap. It's so luxurious, they say -- leaves such a lovely clinging fragrance on the skin. Try this big satin-smooth bath cake nine out of ten screen stars use. Enjoy its rich, creamy lather -- abundant even in hard water. In a jiffy, it whisks away dust and dirt -- makes you sure of skin that's fresh, really sweet. Fastidious women love the delicate Lux Toilet Soap perfume, an exclusive blend of flower fragrances. Rose, lilac, jasmine are just a few. The generous new bath-size Lux Toilet Soap is now available everywhere. Get a few cakes tomorrow. The whole family will enjoy the new bath-size Lux Toilet Soap.

MUSIC:

LUX THEME ... TILL END

ANNOUNCER:

Be sure to listen next Monday night to the Lux Radio Theatre presentation of "My Dream Is Yours," starring Jack Carson and June Haver. Stay tuned for MY FRIEND IRMA, which follows over these same stations.

SOUND:

APPLAUSE ... TILL END

ANNOUNCER:

This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.