Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Lux Radio Theater
Show: Remember the Night
Date: Mar 25 1940

CAST:

The Lux Team:
ANNOUNCER, Melville Ruick
CECIL B. DeMILLE, your host
GUEST, who gets naked in a tub
LIBBY COLLINS, Hollywood reporter

The Leads:
LEE LEANDER, the prosecuted / BARBARA STANWYCK
JOHN SARGENT, the prosecutor / FRED MacMURRAY

The Big Apple Team:
CLERK
MEYER (1 line)
DISPATCHER (1 line)
CASSIDY, police officer (1 line)
MISS DAY, secretary
DISTRICT ATTORNEY
TOM, works for D.A.
RUFUS, John's servant
JUDGE
O'LEARY, the defense attorney
GUARD
FAT MIKE, the bail bondsman
WAITER (3 lines)
MATRON (2 lines)
COURTROOM CROWD
RESTAURANT DINERS

The Hoosier Team:
DOG, who wails and barks
MAN (3 lines)
MRS. MALONE, Lee's bitter mother
MOTHER, John's loving mother
EMMA, John's spinster aunt
WILLY, hired boy
M.C., at the barn dance (1 line)
BARN DANCE CROWD

ANNOUNCER:

Lux presents Hollywood!

MFX:

LUX THEME ... THEN IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

The Lux Radio Theatre brings you Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray in "Remember the Night," with Elizabeth Patterson, Beulah Bondi and Sterling Holloway. And, ladies and gentlemen, your producer, Mr. Cecil B. DeMille!

MFX:

THEME ... UP AND OUT

SFX:

APPLAUSE

DEMILLE:

Greetings from Hollywood, ladies and gentlemen. Fine acting, a good story, and superb direction -- each contribute to the success of a motion picture. And we'll have to combine all three to explain the resounding success of the current Paramount picture, "Remember the Night."

As it happens, I take a personal pride in the success of this picture because Mitchell Leisen, who directed it, served his apprenticeship with me. Consequently, it's with a special bow in Mitch's direction that I introuduce our radio adaptation of his screen hit, "Remember the Night," a triumphal return engagement for the same two stars who played it on the screen, Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray -- and, with them, we have Beulah Bondi, Elizabeth Patterson and Sterling Holloway of the picture cast.

"Remember the Night" is a play you'll remember. And Lux Toilet Soap is a product you'll remember. When our feminine listeners remember to think of their appearance -- and that's at least, well, part of the time -- they know Lux Toilet Soap is a real aid to loveliness.

Just why Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray have never been teamed before is one of Hollywood's unsolved mysteries. But the results in this picture call loudly for more of the same. So we were very insistent on having these stars of the picture in our production tonight. Barbara dropped in to visit my "Northwest Mounted Police" set but I sent her home right away to get her script of "Remember the Night." And I had to break into something to get Fred MacMurray. I had to break into his vacation in Mexico. It was the same vacation which we interrupted a few weeks ago to bring him back to this microphone. However, he took our persecution very amiably and buckled right down to work.

Ordinarily, I don't suppose a courtroom is the most promising place in the world for a love story -- especially if the party of the first part is the prosecutor and the party of the second part is the girl on trial. But "Remember the Night" is delightfully original from beginning to end, with a love story that begins in a law court.

So once more it's curtain time in the Lux Radio Theatre as we start Act One of "Remember the Night" starring Barbara Stanwyck as Lee Leander, Fred MacMurray as John Sargent, with Beulah Bondi as his mother, Elizabeth Patterson as Aunt Emma, and Sterling Holloway as Willy.

MFX:

FOR AN INTRO ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

DEMILLE:

A jewelry store on New York's Fifth Avenue. In the glittering showcases, a thousand precious stones sparkle in their brilliant settings. Although it's just a few weeks before Christmas, there's only one customer in the store this afternoon, a pretty girl in costly furs. On her wrist is a diamond bracelet, placed there by an enthusiastic clerk. He smiles happily, sensing the sale is practically complete. [X]

CLERK:

Glorious, madam, isn't it? One of our most beautiful bracelets really.

LEE:

Yes, it is beautiful.

CLERK:

You won't regret taking it, madam.

LEE:

I'm sure I won't. What's the price, please?

CLERK:

Only five thousand dollars!

LEE:

Five thousand. That's reasonable.

CLERK:

You won't find another one like it in New York, madam. Shall I have Mr. Meyer make out the papers?

LEE:

Just a moment, please. I think I'd like to see one or two more before I make up my mind. Uh, that one in the lower tray, please. Let me see that.

CLERK:

Oh, of course, madam. (MOVING OFF) Personally, I prefer the one you're wearing but-- Well, this one's quite beautiful, too. The emeralds set the diamonds off very nicely. (MOVING ON) Now if you'll just place this one on your-- Madam? Madam?! Why-- Why, she's gone! (SHOUTS) Mr. Meyer! Mr. Meyer! She's gone! Police! Police!

SFX:

ALARM BELL ... CONTINUES IN BG

MEYER:

Jones! What is it?

CLERK:

Oh, that girl. She went out the door while my back was turned. She went out with a five-thousand-dollar bracelet!

MFX:

BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG

DISPATCHER:

(FILTER) Calling Car Number Seventeen, Car Number Seventeen. Pick up girl, about twenty-three years, dark complexion, silver fox furs. Vicinity Fifth Avenue, Fifty-fourth Street. Search for diamond bracelet stolen from Meyer and Company. That is all!

MFX:

UP BRIEFLY ... THEN IN BG

CASSIDY:

(INTO PHONE) Hello? Hello? Oh. This is Officer Cassidy reporting to headquarters. Say, we picked up that girl on call seventeen. ... Yeah. Caught her cold with the goods in a hock shop over on Third Avenue. She was tryin' to pawn the bracelet. ... Yeah. Okay. I'm bringin' her in now.

MFX:

AN ACCENT ... THEN OUT

SFX:

TELEPHONE RINGS, RECEIVER UP

MISS DAY:

(INTO PHONE) District Attorney's office. ... Who? Oh, just a moment.

D.A.:

Who is it?

MISS DAY:

Commissioner's office. It's about that acquittal yesterday in the shooting case.

D.A.:

(DISMISSIVE) Oh. Tell them I'm busy.

MISS DAY:

(INTO PHONE) Hello? Can the District Attorney call you back? ... Thank you.

SFX:

RECEIVER DOWN

D.A.:

Is that all they have to do? Beef about acquittals? All right, Tom, let's get going.

TOM:

Okay, boss.

D.A.:

What's the first case today?

TOM:

Ah, it's a cinch. Dame by the name of Lee Leander cops a bracelet out of Meyer and Company on Third Avenue and hocks it. Open and shut.

D.A.:

First offense?

TOM:

Nah, she's got a record. This is her third offense.

D.A.:

Well, that's good, that's good. A first offender at Christmastime is tougher than tiger meat. Tom, look at that chart -- conviction [rate's] only seventy-eight per cent as against eighty-two per cent last year.

TOM:

Say, can I handle this case, boss? I'll getcha a conviction.

D.A.:

Ah, you probably could handle it as well as some of these dopes but when the right case comes along, I'll give it to ya. Wife beater, something like that. Your face isn't right to prosecute a woman.

TOM:

Aw, boss! Listen--

D.A.:

Nothing doing, Tom, nothing doing. We'll get Sargent on this one.

TOM:

Sargent? What's his face got that mine hasn't got?

D.A.:

Whatever it is, he's never lost a case for me yet.

TOM:

Yeah, but he's gone home for Christmas -- Ohio, Oklahoma, some place like that. Now, listen, I could get you a conviction so quick, it'll--

D.A.:

Take it easy, Tom, take it easy. Miss Day, get me John Sargent on the phone.

MISS DAY:

Yes, sir.

SFX:

ROTARY DIAL, IN BG

TOM:

(SIGHS) Aw, boss, that ain't fair!

D.A.:

Stop moaning! Sargent is terrific with these pretty girls-- (FADES OUT)

SFX:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... TELEPHONE RINGS, CONTINUES IN BG

RUFUS:

(CALLS) Oh, Mr. Sargent? Mr. Sargent?! Phone's ringin'!

JOHN:

(OFF) Well, answer it, will ya? I'm trying to get packed up in here.

RUFUS:

Okay, I'll answer it.

SFX:

RECEIVER UP

RUFUS:

Hello?

JOHN:

(APPROACHES, LOW VOICE) Hey! Wait a minute, Rufus!

RUFUS:

Huh?

JOHN:

(LOW) Listen, if that's the office, tell them I've already left.

RUFUS:

(LOW) Okay. (INTO PHONE) Hello? ... Yes, sir. Yes, sir. ... Well, if this is the office, he's already left.

JOHN:

Oh, you blockhead! Give me that phone.

RUFUS:

I just said--

JOHN:

Shut up. (INTO PHONE, FAKE SOUTHERN ACCENT) Good mornin'! Who all wants to speak to Mister Sargent, please?!

D.A.:

(FILTER) Oh, hello, Sargent. Who do you think you're kidding?

JOHN:

(NORMAL VOICE) All right, never mind. Who is this?

D.A.:

(FILTER) This is your boss. You know, it's a good thing you didn't take up acting for a living.

JOHN:

Yeah? Well, what do you want?

D.A.:

(FILTER) Well, listen, we got a case to try this morning. Now, I'll see you at the office in fifteen minutes!

JOHN:

Now, wait a minute! I'm supposed to be going home for Christmas!

D.A.:

(FILTER) Sure, sure, you can leave here this afternoon.

JOHN:

Yeah, but I've got seven hundred and thirty miles to drive. You told me I could--

D.A.:

(FILTER) Now, look, Jack, don't argue. It's a female case and I need you. Now, come on.

JOHN:

Oh, I was afraid of this. Who's defending?

D.A.:

(FILTER) O'Leary.

JOHN:

That windbag? He'll give us the Gettysburg Address and the Declaration of Independence--

D.A.: (FILTER) Oh, no, he won't. I'll have Tom meet you in court and you'll be out of there by noon. Now, get right down here. Goodbye!

JOHN:

Now, listen, boss--

SFX:

LINE IS DISCONNECTED

JOHN:

Hello? Hello?

SFX:

RECEIVER DOWN

JOHN:

(DISGUSTED, TO HIMSELF) Oh, O'Leary! He'll talk all day. All day long.

RUFUS:

When you leavin', Mr. Sargent?

JOHN:

Shut up.

RUFUS:

Yes, sir.

SFX:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... COURTROOM CROWD MURMURS ... GAVEL BANGS ... CROWD QUIETS BEHIND--

JUDGE:

Quiet, please! Proceed with your summation, Mr. O'Leary.

O'LEARY:

Thank you, your honor. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, during the course of this trial, you've heard the prosecuting attorney, Mr. Sargent, attempt to prove that a valuable bracelet was taken from the premises of Meyer and Company by the defendant. All this has been a waste of time, ladies and gentlemen of the jury -- of your time and mine. Time we could spend to better advantage in last-minute Christmas shopping. At least, I know that's what I'd like to be doing. (CHUCKLES)

JOHN:

May it please the court, we object, your honor. The jury's Christmas shopping has nothing to do with the case.

JUDGE:

Objection sustained.

O'LEARY:

I withdraw the allusion, your honor. Ladies and gentlemen, when I say that time has been wasted, I mean the state has gone to great lengths to prove that Anna Rose Malone, sometimes known as Lee Leander ...

JOHN:

(LOW, QUICKLY) Sometimes known as a lot of other things.

O'LEARY:

... did on the afternoon of December third, walk out upon Fifth Avenue with a bracelet which was still the property of Meyer and Company, to prove something she freely admits -- as if the proof of this constituted a proof of guilt. Since the dawn of civilization, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, since the beginnings of jurisprudence, wise men -- and women! -- have refused to be hoodwinked by circumstantial evidence. The contents of a whiskey bottle ... (CONTINUES IN BG)

TOM:

(LOW) Hey, Jack, I don't like the smile on that jury's pan.

JOHN:

(LOW) All juries get softhearted at Christmas, Tommy. If you ever get a case to prosecute and you see that "peace on earth, good will toward men" look come in their eyes, get a continuance -- even if you have to fall down and tell the judge you ate green apples.

TOM:

(DISMISSIVE) Ah--

O'LEARY:

...believe that a young woman walking out of a store with something not her own is necessarily an evil doer. Ohhh, how flimsy is this argument! How unfair! But on it, and because of it, you have been asked to take away the liberty of a fellow human being! Now, the truth is simple. The bracelet was removed during a temporary loss of will and consciousness, now known as schizophrenia, but formerly known as hypnotism!

SFX:

CROWD REACTS, CONTINUES MURMURING IN BG ... GAVEL BANGS

TOM:

Holy mackerel, that's a sweet one! Hypnotism.

JOHN:

Shut up, Tommy.

TOM:

You mean you're not gonna object?

JOHN:

Shut up. He's just postponed the case till after Christmas.

TOM:

Yeah? How do you figure that?

JOHN:

Hypnotism.

TOM:

(DISMISSIVE) Ohhhh--

SFX:

GAVEL BANGS ... CROWD QUIETS BEHIND--

O'LEARY:

Yes! Yes, I said hypnotism and that's exactly what I meant. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I want you to gaze upon this girl's face. Is this the face of a hardened criminal? An outcast from society? No! No! But the prosecution would have you believe that she willingly and in her right mind, stole -- stole! -- a bracelet. Ladies and gentlemen, let me tell you what really happened. The truth! This girl -- this poor unfortunate creature -- went into that jewelry store not to buy, not to steal, but only to look. A salesman showed her the bracelet, urged her to clasp it around her wrist, begged her to examine it under a more powerful light, and then excused himself. The bracelet is under a powerful light. The young girl stares at it, closer, closer. The great central stone flashes blindingly in her eyes -- blue, green, purple, orange! Closer, still closer! Suddenly, the colors are gone. Everything is dark. A breath of cold air brings her to
her senses, but-- What's this? Where is the jewelry store? Where is the light she was standing under? What is she doing on Fifth Avenue, blocks away from Meyer and Company? She - she doesn't know. She can't remember. Her mind is a blank. And why? Why?! This girl -- this poor unfortunate creature -- was a victim! An unwilling victim of hypnosis!

SFX:

CROWD REACTS

O'LEARY:

Your honor, the defense rests.

SFX:

GAVEL BANGS ... CROWD QUIETS

JOHN:

(LOW) All right, now, Tommy -- watch! (TO JUDGE) Your honor?

JUDGE:

Yes?

JOHN:

Your honor, the hypothesis of hypnotism is a very interesting one; let me be the first to admit it. But unfortunately I am no Svengali, nor are you, ladies and gentlemen of the jury. The people of the state of New York will require the expert testimony of Dr. Keinmus, the psychiatrist. For this purpose, the people will request a continuance be granted till after the Christmas holidays.

O'LEARY:

We object, your honor. The defense has already summed up. The case was practically closed.

JUDGE:

Objection overruled.

O'LEARY:

But, you honor--!

JUDGE:

The defendant will remain in custody, subject to giving a five thousand dollar bond. And all jurors, parties and witnesses are instructed to return to the court, Tuesday, January third. Court adjourned -- and a very merry Christmas to you all.

SFX:

GAVEL ... CROWD MURMURS, THEN IN BG

O'LEARY:

Just a minute, just a minute, Sargent. That was a dirty trick you played on me. Means another day in court, and I don't get paid by the state. I have to earn my money.

JOHN:

No more sense of humor than a gravestone.

O'LEARY:

Huh?

JOHN:

Well, merry Christmas, Francis.

O'LEARY:

Why, you--!

GUARD:

Aw, take it easy, Miss Leander.

LEE:

Let me go! I want to speak to my lawyer! Mr. O'Leary, this guard says I have to have a bond or stay in jail.

O'LEARY:

That's right.

LEE:

Is it right? (SARCASTIC) You ought to know, Mr. District Attorney.

JOHN:

I'm afraid it is.

LEE:

Well, how can I get a bond? I haven't any more money and I don't want to spend Christmas in jail! Please don't let them do that!

O'LEARY:

What do you mean you haven't got any more money? What have I been talkin' for? To hear my own voice?

LEE:

If you hadn't talked so much, I'd be out of here right now!

O'LEARY:

What do you mean by that?

LEE:

Hypnotism! That gag's so old, it's got whiskers! Oh, please! Please, don't let them keep me here over Christmas!

O'LEARY:

(MOVING OFF, DISGUSTED) Aw, what's the difference? What could you do if you haven't got any money?

LEE:

(CALLS) I could walk around, couldn't I?!

GUARD:

Come on, miss. It ain't as bad as you think. You get a nice little room and a nice turkey dinner on Christmas--

LEE:

Yes, yes, I know. Never mind the build-up. Let's go. (MOVING OFF, BITTERLY IRONIC, TO JOHN) I hope you have a merry Christmas, Mr. Sargent!

TOM:

(WHISTLES) Hey, she's kind o' sore at you, Jack.

JOHN:

Yeah. Say, uh, Tommy, on your way out, send Fat Mike in here, will you?

TOM:

Huh? Fat Mike, the bondsman?

JOHN:

If you know any other Fat Mikes, you can send them, too.

TOM:

I get it.

JOHN:

You don't, but let it pass.

TOM:

(MOVES OFF) Okay. I'll send him right away.

SFX:

DOOR

TOM:

(OFF) Hey, Mike?

MIKE:

(OFF) Yeah?

TOM:

(OFF) Mr. Sargent wants to see you right away.

MIKE:

(OFF) Sure, sure. Comin'.

SFX:

DOOR

MIKE:

Hello, Mr. Sargent. You want to see me?

JOHN:

Yeah. What'll you charge for five thousand bail from now till January third?

MIKE:

(LOW) Did they pin somethin' on ya, pal?

JOHN:

Nah, it isn't for me; it's for the young woman who was in here today.

MIKE:

(KNOWINGLY) Ohhh... I see.

JOHN:

How much?

MIKE:

For a friend of yours? Nuthin'! Not a red Samelka.

JOHN:

(COLD) I didn't ask you for any favors.

MIKE:

(GREASY) Favors? It's a privilege. You still livin' at the same place?

JOHN:

(PUZZLED) Yeah. Why?

MIKE:

How soon you want her out?

JOHN:

Right away.

MIKE:

Okay. She's out.

JOHN:

Thanks. So long.

MFX:

BRIDGE

JOHN: (WHISTLES "BACK HOME AGAIN IN INDIANA," THEN CALLS) Hey, Rufus?! You got those other grips packed? (NO ANSWER) Rufus?!

RUFUS:

(LOW) Here I am, boss.

JOHN:

What's the matter with you?

RUFUS:

She's here, boss.

JOHN:

Who's here?

RUFUS:

I don't know.

JOHN:

Then how do you know she's here?

RUFUS:

I just let her in the living room.

JOHN:

You let who in?

RUFUS:

The lady.

JOHN:

You - you mean there's a lady here in the apartment?

RUFUS:

Yes, sir.

JOHN:

Well, what'd you let her in for? I told you I wasn't home to anybody.

RUFUS:

Yes, sir. I told him that. But he shoved the door open anyhow and pushed the lady in with his compliments.

JOHN:

Who did?

RUFUS:

A man. Uh, Fat Ike.

JOHN:

Fat Ike? You mean Fat Mike?

RUFUS:

Yes, sir. He sure ain't Thin Mike.

JOHN:

What'd he bring her here for?

RUFUS:

I don't know.

JOHN:

Guess I'll have to go and speak to her.

RUFUS:

Yes, you will. (LAUGHS)

SFX:

DOOR OPENS

JOHN:

Well... hello.

LEE:

Hello.

JOHN:

What are you doing here?

LEE:

I don't know yet. But I've got a rough idea.

JOHN:

Well, anyway, I'm glad you're out.

LEE:

Mm hm. Now what do I have to do for it?

JOHN:

Well, for one thing, you could say thank you, but if that doesn't fit in with your plans, just skip it. My motives in this matter are--

RUFUS:

Here ya are, boss. Here's the drinks.

JOHN:

What drinks? I didn't--

RUFUS:

Scotch and soda, miss?

LEE:

Thanks!

SFX:

CLINK OF DRINKS

RUFUS:

Drink, boss?

JOHN:

Get out of here.

RUFUS:

(HIGHLY AMUSED, MOVING OFF) Yes, sir! Yes, sir! I know! (LAUGHS)

LEE:

You know, one of these these days, one of you boys is going to start one of these scenes differently -- and one of us girls is going to drop dead from surprise.

JOHN:

What are you talking about?

LEE:

I suppose you do this with all the lady prisoners?

JOHN:

(IRONIC) Oh, yes. My life is just one long round of whoopee.

LEE:

Well, you're in a good spot for it.

JOHN:

Wonderful. I have only to wave a finger and I can satisfy my slightest whim.

LEE:

And I suppose if anybody says, "no," you just put them right back in the cooler?

JOHN:

That's right. (DROPS THE IRONY) Now look, when court reconvenes I'm going to try to put you in jail for a good long time. That's my business. But you haven't been convicted yet, so I don't see why you shouldn't enjoy Christmas like the rest of us. That's why I told Mike to get you out.

LEE:

And bring me up here!

JOHN:

(INDIGNANT) I did not tell him to bring you up here!

LEE:

Then why did that gorilla bring me up here?!

JOHN:

Because he's got a mind like a - a sewer!

LEE:

Thanks.

JOHN:

Now, look, I'm very glad to have been of service to you. Now, if you'll--

LEE:

(SURPRISED) You mean, I - I don't have to stay here, if I don't want to?

JOHN:

You most certainly do not.

LEE:

Ohh. (PLEASANT) Then I'll stay. But I won't be forced.

JOHN:

Now, wait a minute!

LEE:

You know, there's nothing as dangerous as a square shooter. If all men were like you, there wouldn't be any nice girls left.

JOHN:

Yes, well, all this is leading into a very interesting subject that I haven't time to pursue at the moment. I'm going away on a little trip, and it's quite a drive, and I haven't had my dinner yet.

LEE:

Oh. You mean you want me to go?

JOHN:

Well-- Yes.

LEE:

Where?

JOHN:

Where what?

LEE:

Well, I was on my way to a nice comfortable jail, with three meals a day and turkey for Christmas, and now I--

JOHN:

Don't you live some place?

LEE:

No.

JOHN:

Well, where have you been living, in a tree?

LEE:

I had a room in a hotel, but they locked me out.

JOHN:

Oh. (MAGNANIMOUS) Well, how much do you owe this hotel?

LEE:

A hundred and twenty six dollars and forty cents.

JOHN:

(CAN'T AFFORD IT, DEFEATED) Oh. Well, that doesn't solve any problems.

LEE:

Look, why don't you just put me back in the clink? That solves lots of problems.

JOHN:

Well, for one thing, I'm not sure I can, and-- Well, that wasn't the idea. Have you had dinner?

LEE:

Not yet.

JOHN:

Well, come on then. I'll take you to dinner and we'll figure something out.

LEE:

(BEAT, SERIOUS) You really didn't want me to come here at all then?

JOHN:

I'm sorry to say I did not.

LEE:

(LOW, A LITTLE HURT) I see. Well, shall we go?

RUFUS:

(TICKLED) Here's your hat, boss. Goin' out, huh?

JOHN:

(ANNOYED) Yes, I am!

RUFUS:

(PLEASED) Hot dog! (LAUGHS) But don't forget you got to see your Ma!

JOHN:

Shut up.

RUFUS:

(LAUGHS)

MFX:

SWEET RESTAURANT BAND PLAYS DANCE MUSIC ... THEN IN BG

SFX:

MURMUR OF DINERS ... THEN IN BG

JOHN:

(MORE GOOD-NATURED NOW) Want anything else?

LEE:

(ALSO GOOD-NATURED) No, thanks. (SIGHS) It's been nice up to now.

JOHN:

Yeah. You know, I was thinking. I, er, I might lend you my apartment while I'm away.

LEE:

(LAUGHS) That sounds like a play, doesn't it?

JOHN:

Yeah. Sounds like a flop.

LEE:

Don't worry about me. I can always chisel a hotel for a week or so.

JOHN:

That's a nice cheesy idea.

LEE:

Well, I'm not going to sleep in the subway. And as far as the holiday's concerned, I guess I'll get plenty of that when you get through with me. (INHALES SHARPLY) Oh. (APOLOGETIC) Not that I mean it in a disagreeable way, you understand.

JOHN:

I understand.

LEE:

Your business is your business. Of course, some people wouldn't care for that kind of business but - somebody has to do the dirty work.

JOHN:

(DRY) Thanks.

LEE:

It's just too bad it had to be somebody as nice as you.

JOHN:

(GENUINELY CURIOUS) How long have you been swiping things?

LEE:

Always.

JOHN:

Have you been caught before?

LEE:

Uh huh.

JOHN:

Did you take things you didn't need?

LEE:

Sure.

JOHN:

In the presence of beautiful things, did you feel a sudden irresistible urge to take them in your hands and hurry away with them?

LEE: (LAUGHS) You mean, was I hypnotized?

JOHN:

No, no. I mean, maybe you're a kleptomaniac.

LEE:

Oh, no, no. They tried that, though. No. You see, to be a kleptomaniac, you can't sell any of the stuff afterwards, or you, er-- You lose your amateur standing.

JOHN:

Ah, I don't understand it.

LEE:

Oh, I don't think you ever could understand because your mind is different. Right or wrong is the same for everybody, you see, but the rights and the wrongs aren't the same.

JOHN:

Ah, that's ridiculous.

LEE:

Is it? All right, try it like this. Suppose you were starving to death.

JOHN:

Yeah?

LEE:

And you didn't have any food and you didn't have any money, and you didn't have any place to get anything.

JOHN:

Mm hm.

LEE:

And there were some loaves of bread out in front of a market, and-- Well, now, remember, you're starving to death. And the man's back was turned. Would you swipe one?

JOHN:

You bet I would.

LEE:

(TRIUMPHANT) That's because you're honest! You see, I'd have a six course dinner at the table d'hôte across the street, and then say I'd forgotten my purse. Get the difference?

JOHN:

(AMUSED) I think your way's smarter.

LEE:

Yeah, that's it. We're smart. Very smart.

MFX:

BAND FINISHES

SFX:

MURMUR OF DINERS CONTINUES IN BG

JOHN:

Well, if we're all finished-- (CALLS) Waiter? Check, please.

WAITER:

Right away, sir.

JOHN:

Well, Miss Leander, I got a couple of extra bucks I don't need. Here's a Christmas dinner I promised ya, and a room, and a couple of breakfasts.

LEE:

(GENUINE) Aw, thanks. Thanks a lot.

WAITER:

(OFF) Check, sir.

JOHN:

Oh. Here you are. Oh, uh, will you ask the band to play "My Indiana Home"?

WAITER:

(OFF) Oh, yes, sir. (MOVING OFF) I'll ask them.

JOHN:

Thank you.

LEE:

Why do you want them to play that?

JOHN:

Because that's where I'm going.

LEE:

(STUNNED) No! Are you a Hoosier?

JOHN:

Yeah. Wabash, Indiana. That is, a farm just outside of Wabash.

LEE:

Wabash, India--!

MFX:

BAND STARTS PLAYING THE 1917 POP SONG "BACK HOME AGAIN IN INDIANA" ... CONTINUES IN BG

LEE:

Oh, no wonder I like you. I'm from Eltonville.

JOHN:

No!

LEE:

Uh huh.

JOHN:

Why, that's only about fifty miles from--

LEE:

Yes, sir.

JOHN:

Well, I'll be darned. And we have to come here and meet like this.

LEE:

Yeah, it's funny, isn't it? (BEAT) So - you're going back home, huh?

JOHN:

Yeah. I go home every Christmas.

LEE:

You do? (BEAT) Oh. Gee, that's great.

JOHN:

My mother still runs the farm. Does all right, too. She raises Partridge Wyandottes, Poland Chinas--

LEE:

Aw, we never had anything that swell.

JOHN:

We never did either till lately. How long since you been home?

LEE:

Never.

JOHN:

Why?

LEE:

I ran away.

JOHN:

Well, I don't know what the circumstances were, of course.

LEE:

Not so hot.

JOHN:

Well, time takes care of those things. Do they write to you?

LEE:

I had a letter from my mother when my father died.

JOHN:

Oh, your mother's alive then?

LEE:

I hope so. (BEAT) That song -- it's - awful pretty isn't it? Kind of-- Oh, it kind of does things to you.

JOHN:

Yeah. Say, look. How would you like to go home for Christmas?

LEE:

What?

JOHN:

I mean it. I could drop you off at your place and pick you up on my way back.

LEE:

Home? Oh, gee, I - I don't know.

JOHN:

Ah, come on, it'll do you good. What do you say?

LEE:

All right. Unless-- Aren't you afraid?

JOHN:

Afraid of what?

LEE:

How it might look. Rising young district attorney and -- me?

JOHN:

Oh, I - I didn't think of it.

LEE:

I know. You never think of anything wrong, do you? That's what makes you - such a swell guy.

MFX:

"BACK HOME AGAIN IN INDIANA" ... TO A FINISH

SFX:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

The curtain falls on the first act of "Remember the Night" with Barbara Stanwyck, Fred MacMurray, Elizabeth Patterson, Beulah Bondi and Sterling Holloway.

Over on Rockwell Street, in a little white bungalow, the first guest has just arrived a bit early for one of those bridge get-togethers the ladies have from time to time. We're going to let you hear what this guest says -- and what she thinks, too.

GUEST:

(SPEAKS, LOUD) Why, hello, Ellie! How nice you look. (THINKS, LOW) Where did she find that dress, I wonder? She has the best taste. (SPEAKS) Here's the way I look, Ellie. I'm a little early. Came right straight from the office. I worked late and I didn't really have time to go home and change. (THINKS) Gosh, do I feel grimy! If I could only take a quick bath. (SPEAKS) My, how lovely the living room looks! Those flowers are just the right color. (THINKS) I wonder if she'd think me nervy if I asked to take a bath. (SPEAKS) Tired? Oh, well, not exactly, Ellie. I'm just sort of-- Well, messy, you know? ... A bath? Oh, how lovely of you! I hadn't thought of it but it would make me feel better. ... Oh, thanks. That's awfully kind. What a pretty negligee! (THINKS) Will I feel good in this! Everything she has is perfect.

SFX:

RUNING WATER IN BATH TUB ... THEN IN BG

GUEST:

(SPEAKS) Yes, thanks so much, Ellie. Don't wait. I have everything I need. (THINKS) She's got Lux Toilet Soap. I ought to have known she would. She's got such taste! Everything is perfect.

SFX:

RUNING WATER STOPS ... BODY ENTERS TUB ... WASHING, IN BG, OUT AT [X]

GUEST:

(THINKS) Mmmm! Gosh, does it feel good. This nice Lux soap will do the trick, all right. I love the way it lathers! [X]

ANNOUNCER:

Yes, a Lux Toilet Soap beauty bath will do the trick; leave Ellie's guest feeling fresh from head to toe. This luxurious white soap -- that nine out of ten screen stars use -- has creamy Active Lather that swiftly carries away perspiration, every trace of dust and dirt. You'll find a daily Lux Soap beauty bath a wonderful way to protect daintiness, make you sure of fresh, fragrant skin. And it's true that Lux Toilet Soap in your bathroom has come to be one of those little things that mean good housekeeping, good taste.

The superlative quality of this fine, white soap -- it's delicate, distinctive perfume -- makes it a joy to family and to guests. It's luxurious and yet not a luxury, for it's sold by so many thousands of cakes that its price is kept low. Now, the economical way to buy it is three cakes at a time. And you might try leaving a cake you aren't using in among your linens or underthings. It'll leave them delightfully fragrant.

Now, our producer, Mr. DeMille.

DEMILLE:

Act Two of "Remember the Night" starring Barbara Stanwyck as Lee, and Fred MacMurray as John Sargent, with Beulah Bondi as his mother, Elizabeth Patterson as Aunt Emma, and Sterling Holloway as Willy.

MFX:

FOR AN INTRO ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

DEMILLE:

Westward, along the snowbanked highways from New York, more than twenty hours of steady driving have brought Lee Leander and Jack Sargent to Eltonville, Indiana, and the front gate of Lee's former home. A bright moon softens the outline of the ramshackle house that stands cold and dark on the outskirts of the town. From within the house, comes the warning wail of a dog ...

SFX:

DOG WAILS ... IN BG

DEMILLE:

... as Jack swings the car up to the sagging front porch. [X]

SFX:

CAR ENGINE SLOWS TO IDLE ... THEN IN BG

JOHN:

This is it, huh?

LEE:

Yes.

JOHN:

Well, all out, then. The end of the line.

SFX:

ENGINE TURNED OFF ... CAR DOOR OPENS ... DOG WAILS, CONTINUES IN BG

LEE:

(UNEASY) Oh, please, let's wait till-- Well, my mother might not even live here any more.

JOHN:

(AMUSED) Hey, don't be so nervous.

LEE:

Well, will you go in with me?

JOHN:

Sure I'll go in with you. Come on, I've got your bag.

SFX:

THEIR FOOTSTEPS ON GRAVEL ... IN BG

LEE:

See that tree?

JOHN:

Yeah?

LEE:

I fell out of it when I was twelve. Oh, I was a terrible tomboy. See? From that branch right up there. Landed on my head, too.

JOHN:

(CHUCKLES, LIGHTLY) That's a better gag than hypnotism! Your lawyer should have used that. As a matter of fact, you should have had me for your lawyer.

SFX:

THEIR FOOTSTEPS ONTO WOODEN FRONT PORCH ... THEN STOP

JOHN:

(REASSURING) Come on, now -- smile. Here we are.

SFX:

LOUD KNOCKS ON FRONT DOOR ... DOG BARKS, FROM INSIDE HOUSE, IN BG

LEE:

Oh, gee, I didn't mean to knock so loud. Why, that sounds like Mickie barking. Oh, it couldn't be. He'd be too-- Here's somebody coming.

JOHN:

Yeah. Now, look, I'll pick you up on New Year's Day in the afternoon. Don't forget.

LEE: No. Gee, you've been sweet.

SFX:

DOOR OPENS

MAN:

(TO DOG, SAVAGELY) Will you shut up?!

SFX:

DOG SHUTS UP

MAN:

(TO LEE, BRUSQUE) Yes?

LEE:

Oh, I'm terribly sorry. Doesn't Mrs. Malone live here?

MAN:

Oh. I guess you want my wife.

LEE:

Oh, I didn't know.

MALONE:

(APPROACHES) Who is it, Henry? Somebody want me?

LEE:

Mama! Oh, Merry Christmas, mama. (NO RESPONSE) Well, you - you know me, don't you?

MALONE: (UNHAPPY) Come in.

SFX:

DOOR CLOSES

LEE:

This is Mister, uh--?

JOHN:

Sargent. How do you do?

MALONE:

(UNFRIENDLY) Sit down.

LEE:

(AWKWARD) You're looking fine, mama.

MALONE:

What didja come here for? What do you want?

LEE:

Oh, I don't want anything, mama. It was just Christmas and Mr. Sargent happened to be driving past--

JOHN:

You see, I live in Wabash; it's just about fifty miles from here, and I knew you'd be glad to see--

MALONE:

Glad? Why should I be glad? Good riddance to bad rubbish, I said the day she left.

LEE:

Oh, mama, please. Mr. Sargent--

MALONE:

(BITTER) Just like her father, she is! Always laughin' at serious things, she was. Never doin' what she's told -- till she winds up stealin'. Stealin' my mission money! Money I'd put by with the sweat of my brow, that's what!

LEE:

I didn't steal it. I told you a thousand times I only borrowed it. I was going to pay you back!

MALONE:

But you didn't pay me back, did you? And you never paid me back!

LEE:

(TEARFUL) Well, how could I after you called me a thief right in front of the whole town?! Nobody would give me a job!

MALONE:

And you left here. The Great Lady! We weren't good enough for ya. A decent home, a hard-workin' mother -- and a crook for a daughter!

LEE:

(READY TO CRY) Oh, mama!

JOHN:

Look, Lee. I don't want to tear you away but, uh, we still have fifty miles to go.

LEE:

(SIGHS) Oh.

JOHN:

Are you ready?

LEE:

(RELIEVED) Oh, yes.

JOHN:

It's been very interesting to meet you, Mrs., uh--?

MALONE:

The name doesn't concern ya.

JOHN:

It most certainly does not. (TO LEE) Come on, kid.

SFX: DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES ... DOG HOWLS OFF

LEE:

(EMOTIONAL) I'd - I'd forgotten how much that woman hates me. And how much I hate her. That's a terrible thing to say it, isn't it?

JOHN:

No.

LEE: But ever since I was little, she was always so right and I was always so wrong. Thanks for getting me out. I'll stay anywhere. Any old place'll do, if I'm far enough away from her!

JOHN:

Hey, take it easy.

LEE:

I wish I'd broken my neck when I fell out of that tree.

JOHN:

It's a little too late to think about that now, isn't it?

LEE:

You won't make me stay in Eltonville? You'll find me a room somewhere else?

JOHN:

Sure I will.

LEE:

Any old dump will do.

JOHN:

That's just what you're going to get. It's only got one window, and the mattress is stuffed with rocks; and it's got a painting of the cross-eyedest old man you ever saw in your life.

LEE:

(PUZZLED) How do you know?

JOHN:

How do I know what? Oh. That my grandfather was cross-eyed?

LEE:

You mean, you're - you're taking me home with you?

JOHN:

Why not?

LEE:

(BREAKS DOWN AND CRIES) Oh--!

JOHN:

Well, for--! Now what?

LEE:

(CONTINUES TO CRY) Oh--!

MFX:

BRIDGE

SFX:

CAR HORN HONKS

JOHN:

(SHOUTS) Hey, anyone home?!

SFX:

CAR DOOR OPENS

JOHN:

(SHOUTS) Hey!

MOTHER:

(OFF, HAPPY) John! John!

JOHN:

Hello, mother!

MOTHER:

(APPROACHES, AN EMBRACE) Oh, my boy, my boy!

JOHN:

Gosh, mother, it's good to see you.

MOTHER:

Oh, I just can't believe you're here at last.

EMMA:

(APPROACHES) Well, Jack Sargent!

JOHN:

Aunt Emmy! Hello, Emmy, how about a kiss, huh?

EMMA:

(LAUGHS, BREATHLESS) I declare, I'm glad you're here. If only to stop your mother from taking leave of her senses! (LAUGHS)

JOHN:

(LAUGHS)

WILLY:

Oh, boy, I'll say! Hello, John. Welcome home.

JOHN:

Hello, Willy. The girls still chasin' ya?

WILLY:

(LAUGHS SHYLY) Aw, John--

MOTHER:

What made you so late, dear? We thought you'd be here by six at least.

JOHN:

Well, you see--

WILLY:

Hey, who's that in the front seat?

JOHN:

Oh, I - I'm sorry.

SFX:

CAR DOOR OPENS

JOHN:

Mother, this is Miss Lee Leander. She's come to spend Christmas with us.

LEE:

How do you do?

MOTHER:

Oh, how nice! I'm so glad to know you, my dear.

JOHN:

And this is my Aunt Emmy. Knows more about flannel cakes than the guy who invented 'em.

LEE:

Hello.

EMMA:

I'm right pleased to meet you, Miss Leander.

JOHN:

And this is Willy Simms, our hired boy. Crazy about the girls and the girls are crazy about him, huh? Willy Simms.

WILLY:

Pleased to meet 'cha.

LEE:

Hello. I hope I won't be too much trouble, Mrs. Sargent.

MOTHER:

Trouble? Why, bless you, child. It's a joy to have ya here.

EMMA:

No trouble at all.

MOTHER:

But, John Sargent, why didn't you send me a telegram?

JOHN:

Well, you see, mother, this was rather unexpected--

MOTHER:

Well, never mind all that. Now, come along, child. You must be near freezing to death and here we are cackling like a couple of-- Emmy?!

EMMA:

What?

MOTHER:

Did you leave those cookies in the oven?

EMMA:

Oh! (MOVING OFF) Jeepers creepers!

MOTHER:

Come along now, everyone. (MOVING OFF) This way, Miss Leander.

LEE:

(MOVING OFF) Thanks.

WILLY:

(A BEAT, DREAMY) Oh boy, John.

JOHN:

What?

WILLY:

Ain't she a peach-o-reno?

JOHN:

Who? Oh. (CHUCKLES)

WILLY:

(CHUCKLES) All I can say is-- (CLICKS TONGUE) Hot dog!

JOHN:

(AMUSED, MOVING OFF) Come on, grab a grip, Willy. I want to thaw out in a hurry.

SFX:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE

MFX:

JOHN PLAYS ON PARLOR PIANO, HITS SOUR NOTES ... ABRUPTLY STOPS

MOTHER:

Go on, Jack. Now, don't stop. Play that other piece you used to do so good.

JOHN:

I can't remember it any more, mother.

MOTHER:

Oh, well, try, dear.

MFX:

PIANO ... DVORAK'S "HUMORESQUE" ... CONTINUES IN BG, OUT AT [X]

MOTHER:

Don't you think he plays nice, Miss Leander?

JOHN:

You don't have to answer that, Lee. I had fourteen dollars worth of piano lessons once and they've never forgotten it.

LEE:

(LAUGHS)

EMMA:

Willy, hand me that popcorn. We've got to have it all strung for the tree tomorrow.

WILLY:

Yes'm. Here ya are.

EMMA:

Well, here, you can help me. You haven't done a thing all night.

WILLY:

Aw, gee. Didn't I help Miss Leander with all them dinner dishes?

MOTHER:

You should have done them yourself, Willy. Miss Leander's a guest.

LEE:

Oh, I liked doing them, Mrs. Sargent. I've lived in hotels and j-- Um, places so long I haven't been around a house as much as I'd like.

WILLY:

Your folks dead?

EMMA:

Willy!

WILLY:

Ma'am?

EMMA:

(MUTTERS) Of all things!

WILLY:

Oh.

LEE:

Oh, I don't mind. My father's dead. My mother's remarried.

MOTHER:

Well, that's too bad, my dear. I always say it's so hard on the children. It just isn't the same with a new parent. [X]

EMMA:

Go on, go on, Jack. Now, just one more piece.

JOHN:

No, that's all till next year, Aunt Emmy.

MOTHER:

Aw, please, dear.

LEE:

I'll play you a piece if you want.

MOTHER:

Oh, that'd be fine.

WILLY:

Aw, gee, can you play?

LEE:

Well, I used to play in the dime store. What would you all like?

MOTHER:

It doesn't make any difference.

WILLY:

I can sing "The End of a Perfect Day."

EMMA:

Now, Willy--!

WILLY:

Well, I can.

MOTHER:

So can everybody else, Willy.

LEE:

"The End of a Perfect Day." I think I remember it.

WILLY:

Oh, boy! Give us a downbeat please, Miss Leander.

MFX:

OPENING CHORDS ... CARRIE JACOB-BOND'S 1909 SONG "A PERFECT DAY" ... IN BG

WILLY:

(SINGS) When you come to the end of a perfect day,
And you sit alone with your thought ...

BIZ:

(ALL JOIN IN SINGING)
While the chimes ring out with a carol gay,
For the joy that the day has brought ... (FADES OUT)

MFX:

FADES OUT WITH SINGING

SFX:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... CLOCK CHIMES TEN ... IN BG

MOTHER:

Well, son, time for bed. Gracious, the evening's gone fast. The rest went up long ago.

JOHN:

Wait, mother. There's one thing you must be curious about.

MOTHER:

What, dear?

JOHN:

Miss Leander.

MOTHER:

Yes?

JOHN:

I - I don't know whether to tell you this or not, but I don't like to bring somebody under your roof without you knowing exactly who she is.

MOTHER:

(KNOWINGLY) Oh, John, I think I can guess.

JOHN:

What? Oh, no. No, not all, mother. She isn't even a friend of mine.

MOTHER:

Well, she certainly should be. I think she's charming.

JOHN:

She is charming, mother, but, uh--

MOTHER:

She reminds me of your father's cousin, Winifred, who died when her second was born, the lovely sweet thing. I was just saying to Emmy--

JOHN:

Wait a minute, mother. Unfortunately, the girl's a crook. I'm going to put her in jail when we get back to New York.

MOTHER:

What?

JOHN:

But, in the meanwhile, she had no place to go for Christmas, so I--

MOTHER:

Oh, the poor lamb. (INSISTS) You'll do no such thing, John Sargent. Why, that girl's as honest as all outdoors. I can tell by just looking at her face. (UNSURE) Well, if she did take some little thing, I'm - I'm sure it was entirely by mistake. She's - she's probably, um, a hypochondriac.

JOHN:

Hypochondriac, huh? (CHUCKLES) Well, she might be at that.

MOTHER:

She hasn't really taken things, has she, dear? You're just making a bad joke, now, aren't you?

JOHN:

No, mother. I'm afraid this isn't even her first offense. But that doesn't mean she wasn't unhappy, and lonely, and a human being like the rest of us.

MOTHER:

Well, the poor thing probably didn't get enough love as a child. Do you remember how bad you were--? Well, not really bad, but-- Do you remember the time you took my egg money I was gonna buy a new dress with? And then how hard you worked to pay it back when you understood?

JOHN:

You made me understand.

MOTHER:

No, it was love, dear, that made you understand. Well, I do hope she enjoys her stay here. Now, we must do everything to make her happy and comfortable and to feel like one of the family. Do you think we ought to lock up the silver?

JOHN:

(CHUCKLES)

MOTHER:

(LAUGHS) Well, good night, son.

JOHN:

Good night, mother. Merry Christmas.

MOTHER:

Merry Christmas, dear.

MFX:

BRIDGE ... FOR CHRISTMAS MORNING

BIZ:

JOHN, LEE, EMMA, MOTHER AND WILLY BUZZ WITH EXCITEMENT OVER THE PRESENTS ... OUT BEHIND--

MOTHER:

I've never seen so many presents in all my days!

JOHN:

Here's another one for you, mother.

MOTHER:

For me?! Oh, John. Another bottle of perfume. Ecstasy, too. Why, I haven't even started on that bottle of Ecstasy you gave me last year.

EMMA:

(ADMONISHES) Lucy!

MOTHER:

What? (REALIZES) Oh!

JOHN:

And, Aunt Emma, here's a present for you. Willy, what have you got there?

WILLY:

I don't know yet. Gettin' her open.

EMMA:

Why, Jack!

JOHN:

Huh? What?

EMMA:

What's this supposed to be?

MOTHER:

A nightgown, Emmy!

EMMA:

Oh, Jack Sargent! You ought to be ashamed of yourself.

WILLY:

(LAUGHS) Gee, ya can see right through it!

EMMA:

(ADMONISHES) Willy!

LEE:

Lovely, isn't it?

JOHN:

Gee, we've got all our stuff open and-- Well, I'm sorry about the present situation, Lee. If we'd only known sooner--

MOTHER:

Why, John, there's some presents for Miss Leander, over there, on the sofa.

JOHN:

Oh.

EMMA:

Why, of course, Jack. You must have forgotten.

JOHN:

Oh. Well, I guess you can always trust Santa Claus. Three packages, Lee. Merry Christmas to ya.

LEE:

Oh, no. Oh, you shouldn't have gone to all that trouble.

EMMA:

Open them up now, dear.

SFX:

PRESENT UNWRAPPED

LEE:

Oh, what a lovely pin cushion. It's so pretty!

MOTHER:

Oh, it's nothing at all, just scraps and things I've been collecting for years.

JOHN:

Here's the next one. (READS) "Very merry Christmas to Miss Leander, from Jack's Aunt Emmy."

SFX:

PRESENT UNWRAPPED

LEE:

Stockings. Oh, thank you so much.

EMMA:

(CORRECTS HER, CHEERFULLY) Mm mm. Bed socks.

LEE:

Oh.

EMMA:

Not so fancy, but wonderful on a cold night for a spinster lady.

LEE:

Oh, it's awfully sweet of you all.

MOTHER:

Here's another, Miss Leander.

LEE:

Oh, no, not really?

JOHN:

Yeah. Who's that from? Willy?

MOTHER:

From you, you big dunce. Don't you remember anything?

JOHN:

Oh, but I didn't--

MOTHER:

Gracious sakes, Jack, keep quiet.

SFX:

PRESENT UNWRAPPED

LEE:

Ohhh. Perfume! Oh, thank you.

JOHN:

(NERVOUS LAUGH) It's nothing, just a bottle of perfume.

LEE:

And Ecstasy, too!

JOHN:

Yeah, that's right.

LEE:

Oh, you're - you're all much too kind. I don't think I've ever met anyone so thoughtful and--

MOTHER:

Oh, nonsense, child. We're so happy to have you and so anxious for you to enjoy your stay. Of course, there isn't much to do here, except tonight, we're bobbing for apples, and tomorrow the young folks have a treasure hunt, and Thursday's the charity bazaar. Then we rest up for a day. And the next day's New Year's -- that's the big event. And this year, we're having a real old-fashioned barn dance like the hicks we're supposed to be. (LAUGHS)

LEE:

(LAUGHS)

JOHN:

That's all there is. Farmer's wives don't die of boredom any more, they die of heart failure!

BIZ:

ALL LAUGH ... FADES OUT

SFX:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... FADE IN CROWD AT BARN DANCE ... THEN IN BG

MFX:

FOR A BARN DANCE ... UPTEMPO, HEAVY ON THE FIDDLE ... THEN IN BG

MOTHER:

I declare, this is the best barn dance we've ever had.

EMMA:

Yes. (BEAT) Oh, they dance beautifully together, don't they?

MOTHER:

That reminds me-- What? Who?

EMMA:

Jack and Miss Leander. Like they were made for each other.

MOTHER:

If you're hinting that John's in love with her, well-- Well, he isn't, Emmy.

EMMA:

Fiddlesticks, Lucy, fiddlesticks! She's in love with him, too.

MOTHER:

I tell you they're not. You don't know anything about these things, Emmy.

EMMA:

Lucy Sargent, if you're referring to the fact that I never married, I'd like to point out that you don't have to be a horse to judge a horse show. If ever I saw two people in love--

MOTHER:

They're not. They can't be. They just can't be.

MFX:

DANCE TUNE UP, FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG

LEE:

Almost over, isn't it?

JOHN:

Yeah, just about. We'll be pulling out for New York in the morning.

LEE:

And the third will be one day nearer.

JOHN:

The third?

LEE:

Mm hm.

JOHN:

Oh, you mean that third.

LEE:

When my case comes up again.

JOHN:

I haven't thought of it.

LEE:

I have. But you've all been so sweet. No matter what happens after we get back, it won't matter so much. I'll have some wonderful memories.

JOHN:

So will I.

MFX:

DANCE TUNE ENDS ... DRUM ROLL WITH CYMBAL STING

M.C.:

Ladies and gentlemen, I have the honor to wish you all a very happy New Year!

SFX: CROWD CHEERS AND SINGS ALONG WHEN--

MFX:

THE BAND STRIKES UP "AULD LANG SYNE" ... THEN IN BG

JOHN:

Happy New Year, Lee.

LEE:

Happy New Year, Jack.

JOHN:

You know, it's an old fashioned custom but - people always kiss each other-- Well, at this time.

LEE:

I know it.

JOHN:

Well, what am I waiting for?

LEE:

I don't know. Why are you?

MFX:

"AULD LANG SYNE" UP FOR A MOMENT, THEN FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE

EMMA:

Well, six o'clock comes might early, children. You better get your sleep.

JOHN:

What time's breakfast, Aunt Emmy?

EMMA:

Time till you leave early. What'll it be, flannel cakes or fried mush?

JOHN:

Well, how 'bout it, Lee?

LEE:

Oh, I think we'll ride better on the mush.

EMMA:

Fried mush, then. Good night, children.

JOHN:

Good night, Aunt Emmy.

LEE:

Good night.

JOHN:

(TO LEE) You sleepy?

LEE:

Not very.

JOHN:

How 'bout a good-night cigarette?

LEE:

Well-- I'd love it. I'll meet you downstairs.

JOHN:

Swell. (MOVING OFF) I'll be waiting for you.

SFX:

TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... KNOCK AT DOOR

LEE:

Just a minute, Jack. I was just--

SFX:

DOOR OPENS

LEE:

Oh, Mrs. Sargent.

MOTHER:

I'm sorry to disturb you, dear, but you'll be in such a rush in the morning--

LEE:

Oh, no, you're not disturbing me. Come in.

SFX:

DOOR CLOSES

MOTHER:

Thank you. First of all, I want you to know how glad we've been to have you here, and how much I hope you've enjoyed your stay.

LEE:

You'll never know how much.

MOTHER:

And then-- Well, I want you to know how sorry I am that you're in trouble and how much I hope it'll come out all right.

LEE:

I - I didn't know you knew about that.

MOTHER:

Oh, you poor child. You can be sure I never would have mentioned it now, only-- Well-- Has Jack ever told you anything about his childhood?

LEE:

No, why?

MOTHER:

We were very poor after my husband died. In fact, we had nothing. Jack had to do chores before school and after school, and then, after chores, he studied in the evening, so he could go to college. Then he had to work his way through college and through law school. Oh, I don't mean there's anything unusual about it. But I'm - I'm only trying to tell you that he worked very hard to get where he is. Very, very hard. And, well, he's my son, and I wouldn't want anything or anyone to spoil it for him now.

LEE:

I see. But I don't see why anything should spoil it for him, do you?

MOTHER:

He's in love with you.

LEE:

Oh, no, he isn't in love with me. He's never had any more interest in me than-- Well, some panhandler he'd buy a meal for.

MOTHER:

Are you sure?

LEE:

Of course, I'm sure.

MOTHER:

He kissed you tonight.

LEE:

Well, I'm - not exactly ugly. Oh, he might have had a little fever for me but -- it isn't going any further and -- it hasn't been any place either.

MOTHER:

I see.

LEE:

He's no fool. And, even if he was, I wouldn't hurt him. Or you, Aunt Emmy or - even Willy.

MOTHER:

Thank you, dear. And good night.

SFX:

DOOR OPENS

MOTHER:

(OFF) But you do love him, don't you?

LEE:

(SADLY) I'm - I'm afraid so.

MOTHER:

(OFF) I knew you did.

SFX:

DOOR SHUTS

MFX:

SORROWFUL ... FOR A MOMENT, THEN IN BG

SFX:

KNOCK AT DOOR

JOHN:

(BEHIND DOOR) Lee? (NO ANSWER)

SFX:

KNOCK AT DOOR

JOHN:

(BEHIND DOOR) Lee?

LEE:

Yes?

JOHN:

(BEHIND DOOR) How 'bout that good-night cigarette?

LEE:

No. No, thanks. I'm too sleepy.

JOHN:

(BEHIND DOOR) Oh. Okay. See you in the morning. Good night.

LEE:

Good night. (STARTS TO CRY) I'll see you in the morning. (SOBS)

MFX:

TO A FINISH

SFX:

APPLAUSE

ANNOUNCER:

The curtain falls on the second act of "Remember the Night" with Barbara Stanwyck, Fred MacMurray, Elizabeth Patterson, Beulah Bondi and Sterling Holloway. Before our stars return in Act Three, let's hear from our studio reporter, Libby Collins.

LIBBY:

Well, Mr. Ruick, I'm much impressed with a young Warner Brothers star who's attracting a great deal of attention right now -- Jane Wyman.

ANNOUNCER:

Oh, yes, Jane Wyman. Say, she did Warner Brothers proud in "Brother Rat and a Baby." And, let's see--

LIBBY:

And in "Angel from Texas," a new picture which will be out in a few weeks. Young Jane Wyman distinguished herself so in those two parts, Mr. Ruick, that all the wise money in Hollywood is betting that she'll be one of the biggest stars in pictures in a year or two.

ANNOUNCER:

What's Jane like personally, Libby?

LIBBY:

Mm, she's one of the all-'round nicest girls I've ever met. And a regular dynamo of energy. In fact, her nickname at the studio is "Dynamite."

ANNOUNCER:

That's interesting.

LIBBY:

She's just been married to Ronald Reagan (PRONOUNCED "REE-gan") who was her romantic interest in several pictures.

ANNOUNCER:

Yes, I remember that.

LIBBY:

Incidentally, Jane is another of that army of models who've made good in pictures. She makes good use of that experience now by designing her own clothes. Do you know what a Hollywood make-up man told me about Jane Wyman?

ANNOUNCER:

No, what was it, Libby?

LIBBY:

That she's one of the most naturally beautiful girls in Hollywood. And so I thought what she has to say about complexion beauty ought to be especially interesting.

ANNOUNCER:

Well, I think you're right about that, Libby. What does she say?

LIBBY:

She says she thinks the most important single thing a girl can do for her complexion is to use Lux Soap every night at bedtime for an Active Lather facial. Jane says she herself never misses out on this no matter how tired she is. It only takes about three minutes (CHUCKLES) and she sleeps better because her conscience is clear. She knows she "done right" by her skin.

ANNOUNCER:

Thank you, Libby. It's evident that Jane Wyman is a clever little girl. She's not going to risk spoiling her complexion -- the good looks that mean so much to her success -- through carelessness. Now, what about your complexion? Is it as lovely as it ought to be? You'll find Lux Toilet Soap a wonderful beauty aid. You'll find -- if you use it regularly -- this soap with Active Lather really works. Now, perhaps without realizing it, you've been careless about removing stale cosmetics, dust and dirt. And so your skin is-- Well, not what it might be. Why don't you make sure of thorough cleansing? Why don't you begin tonight to give your skin the gentle beauty care that Lux Toilet Soap's Active Lather gives? Take your first Active Lather facial tonight. And then keep it up for thirty days. See what it can do -- for you.

We pause now for station identification. This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.

MFX:

LUX SIGNATURE FILLS THE PAUSE ... THEN OUT

DEMILLE:

The curtain rises on the third act of "Remember the Night."

MFX:

FOR AN INTRO ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

DEMILLE:

It's early the following morning. In the half-light, just before dawn, Jack and Lee are ready to leave for New York. As they come down the steps of the old house, Mrs. Sargent takes Lee aside. [X]

BIZ:

EMMA, WILLY AND JOHN TALK IN BG, DURING LEE AND MOTHER'S EXCHANGE

MOTHER:

Goodbye, dear.

LEE:

Goodbye, Mrs. Sargent.

MOTHER:

Remember, there's always a room upstairs for you and we'll be only too glad to have you -- that is, if everything turns out all right. I mean, of course it will!

LEE:

I know it will.

EMMA:

And don't drive too fast, Jack Sargent. If you get tired, just drive into a field someplace and go to sleep!

JOHN:

No, thanks. Anyway, we're going up through Canada; I've never seen the place.

EMMA:

Canada? What are you talking 'bout?

SFX:

CAR ENGINE STARTS ... CONTINUES IN BG

JOHN:

Oh, just a different way of getting there.

MOTHER:

Well, whatever you do, John, take good care of yourself.

JOHN:

I will, mother.

SFX:

CAR DOOR SHUTS ... CAR DRIVES OFF, DURING FOLLOWING

EMMA:

Bye, Jack!

JOHN:

Bye, Aunt Emmy. So long, Willy.

WILLY:

Goodbye!

MOTHER:

Goodbye, dear! Let me hear from you often!

JOHN:

I will, mother.

WILLY:

Bye! Bye, Miss Leander!

LEE:

Goodbye, Willy! Goodbye, all!

BIZ:

MORE "GOODBYES" FROM EMMA, WILLY AND MOTHER

WILLY:

Don't forget to write!

EMMA:

And don't you forget to chop some wood! Christmas is over!

WILLY:

(SIGHS) Aw, ain't it the truth? Ain't it the truth?

MFX:

BRIDGE

SFX:

CAR ENGINE SLOWS TO A HALT ... ENGINE TURNED OFF

LEE:

What's the idea of stopping?

JOHN:

Lee, do you know where we are?

LEE:

Of course.

JOHN:

We're in Canada.

LEE:

We should be. We crossed the border three hours ago.

JOHN:

No, you don't get it. Look, this is Canada; over there's the United States. Stay here, Lee. Don't go back.

LEE:

Oh, stop talking nonsense.

JOHN:

It isn't nonsense. I'm not a policeman. I can't make you go.

LEE:

(AMUSED) Is your conscience gnawing at you?

JOHN:

What do you think it was when I got bail for you?

LEE:

Oh, that! That seems like eighty years ago. I didn't even know you were against me. Oh, I did know you were supposed to be trying to put me in jail or something, but-- Oh, you were so gentle about it.

JOHN:

Yeah. That's part of the technique. If you don't treat a woman with kid gloves, every man on the jury wants to punch you in the nose. And you have to handle the jury with kid gloves, too, or you'll get it right in the verdict. You know, it's very hard to put a woman in jail, no matter what she's done. I'm supposed to be kind of a specialist at it.

LEE:

No, you're not.

JOHN:

Sure I am.

LEE:

You're just trying to make me hate you, so you won't feel so bad when you give me the business, aren't you?

JOHN:

Look, are you going to stay in Canada?

LEE:

A fine district attorney you are, telling me to jump bail.

JOHN:

You know I love you, don't you?

LEE:

Don't say that!

JOHN:

And you love me.

LEE:

(BEAT, UNCONVINCING) No!

JOHN:

I suppose that's why you've looked at me the way you have; kissed me the way you did. And why your hand has always found mine and my hand has always found yours, whenever they were anywhere near each other.

LEE:

Oh, Jack, don't be a fool. Look, I-- I'm only human, but-- You've got to remember how hard you worked to get where you are. You've got to think of the hours and the days and the years you spent getting through college.

JOHN:

I see. Mother's been talking to you.

LEE:

Well, why shouldn't she? She's got everything to be proud of. And you've got to be proud and think about it, too, instead of telling people to jump bail and--!

JOHN:

Lee. (BEAT) I love you, Lee.

LEE:

Oh, Jack.

JOHN:

I love you.

LEE:

Oh, darling. It'll be awfully hard to lose you.

JOHN:

You know what I wish?

LEE:

What?

JOHN:

I wish the case was over, and you'd been acquitted.

LEE:

(CHUCKLES) Then you shouldn't have had it postponed.

JOHN:

If I hadn't, I'd never have met you.

LEE:

That's true.

JOHN:

So the case is dismissed and you've been acquitted.

LEE:

Hm, knock wood.

JOHN:

And I pull out a marriage license--

LEE:

Oh, gee.

JOHN:

--and we march right into the judge's chambers and have him marry us.

LEE:

You know you're talking like a madman, don't you?

JOHN:

(PAUSE) Yeah. I guess so. Come on, let's go.

MFX:

BRIDGE

SFX:

CITY TRAFFIC, HONKING HORNS ... THEN IN BG

LEE:

(NERVOUS) Jack, the courtroom's less than a block away. Or don't you care if the jury and the rest of them see you with me?

JOHN:

(SARCASTIC) Oh, so I'm not good enough to be seen with you, huh? You don't love me any more?

LEE:

(UNCONVINCING) I never loved you!

JOHN:

(MOCKING) Were you were just toying with me?

LEE:

Oh, shut up.

JOHN:

(LAUGHS) You'll have to develop more courtesy and respect for your future husband, or I shall fall back on strong measures. (RECITES) "A woman, a dog, and a hickory tree / The better you beat 'em, the better they be."

LEE:

Aw, quit it, will you?

JOHN:

(MORE SERIOUS) All right. What?

LEE:

I can't argue with you. Imagine being married to a man who argues for a living. But you know all this isn't right. Can't you see the papers? "District Attorney Marries Girl Crook." I'd only hurt you, Jack.

JOHN:

But you won't be a crook; you'll be acquitted.

LEE:

How do you know?

JOHN:

Well, I don't know, but I think you've got a good chance.

LEE:

You wouldn't do anything to make them acquit me, would you?

JOHN:

What could I do?

LEE:

I don't know, but you could throw the case--

JOHN:

Listen, you're being tried by a judge and a jury. It's up to them. They know the facts, they speak for themselves. There's nothing I can do about it. Not a thing!

LEE:

I hope there isn't. It would be a fine thing, wouldn't it?

JOHN:

Now, don't worry. Everything's gonna come out all right. So long, darling. I'll see you in court.

MFX:

BRIDGE

SFX:

COURTROOM CROWD MURMURS ... GAVEL BANGS ... COURTROOM QUIETS

JUDGE:

You may proceed, Mr. Sargent.

JOHN:

(PLAYING THE OBNOXIOUS BULLY) Thank you, your honor. I will, if this jury will let me. They've been mumbling to themselves all morning.

JUDGE:

I'll take care of the jury, Mr. Sargent.

JOHN:

Thank you. Now, Miss Leander. I believe you have testified that you were hypnotized at the time you left the jewelry store and walked up Fifth Avenue. (NO RESPONSE) Didn't you?

LEE:

I-- I--

JOHN:

Did you or didn't you?! Answer the question, Miss Leander!

LEE:

Well, my lawyer said so.

JOHN:

Oh, your lawyer said so? Are we to understand then that you and your lawyer do not agree as to exactly what happened?

O'LEARY:

Don't answer that question. I object, if your honor please. The question's entirely improper and I ask that it be stricken from the record.

SFX:

COURTROOM REACTS ... MURMURS IN BG

JUDGE:

Sustained. The jury will disregard the question.

JOHN:

I was only trying-- Your honor, those jurors are at it again. If they'd listen to the testimony instead of whispering among themselves--

SFX:

GAVEL BANGS ... COURTROOM QUIETS BEHIND--

JUDGE:

Proceed with the case, please.

JOHN:

You can't hear yourself think. Well, Miss Leander, were you hypnotized or weren't you?

LEE:

I - I suppose I--

JOHN:

We don't want your suppositions! We want to know whether or not you were hypnotized!

LEE:

Yes.

JOHN:

Yes, what?!

LEE:

I guess I was hypnotized.

JOHN:

You guess you were hypnotized? First you suppose you were hypnotized, now you guess you were. Kindly remember you're under oath! Do you know the penalty for perjury?!

O'LEARY:

If your honor please, I object!

JUDGE:

Sustained.

JOHN:

Tell me, Miss Leander. Just how many times have you been hypnotized by beautiful jewelry?

LEE:

I guess quite a lot of times.

JOHN:

Did you hear by any chance Dr. Keinmus's opinion concerning hypnotism? (BEAT) Well?!

LEE:

I - I'm trying to think, I - I -

JOHN:

(FILTER, IN LEE'S MIND) If you don't treat a woman with kid gloves, every man on the jury wants to punch you in the nose.

LEE:

(REALIZES WHAT JOHN'S UP TO) Ohhh....

JOHN:

Will the witness please answer my question?! And will the jury please stop mumbling?!

LEE:

Jack, you - you--

JOHN:

(FILTER, IN LEE'S MIND) You have to handle the jury with kid gloves, too, or you'll get it right in the verdict.

MOTHER:

(FILTER, IN LEE'S MIND) He's my son.

JOHN:

It's all right! It's all right! Just take all the time you want, Miss Leander!

MOTHER:

(FILTER, IN LEE'S MIND) He's worked so hard. I wouldn't want anything to spoil it for him now.

JOHN:

Well, Miss Leander?!

LEE:

Oh--

MOTHER:

(FILTER, IN LEE'S MIND) Nothing must spoil it for him.

JOHN:

Well, Miss Leander, what is it?! What is it?!

LEE:

Oh--

O'LEARY:

Your honor, I object to the tactics being pursued by the district attorney. He's - he's harrying the defendant.

LEE:

No! No, wait! Wait! I want to plead guilty!

BIZ:

COURTROOM CROWD REACTS

JOHN:

(QUICKLY) Your honor, I - I don't believe this young woman is well. I request a five-minute recess!

LEE:

I want to plead guilty!

O'LEARY:

(OVERLAPS JOHN'S NEXT LINE) Your honor, Please! It must be perfectly apparent the witness has been made hysterical by the tactics of the district attorney!

JOHN:

(OVERLAPS O'LEARY ABOVE) Your honor! A few minutes recess, please! She's obviously not responsible for what she's saying!

O'LEARY:

I ask your honor to intercede in this manner!

SFX:

GAVEL BANGS ... SILENCE

JUDGE:

(CALMLY, TO LEE) Why do you wish to plead guilty?

LEE:

Because I am guilty! (SLOW AND QUIET, AS MUCH TO JOHN AS THE JUDGE) You see, when you work hard for something and - and promises are made, you just can't just toss it away, no matter what.

O'LEARY: Your honor, it must be perfectly clear now that this is not normal behavior.

JOHN:

(AGREES) Perfectly clear, of course, and the state has no desire to take advantage of a temporary aberration.

LEE:

There isn't anything temporary about this. Your honor, you can see that I'm in my right mind. (BEAT) I plead guilty.

JUDGE:

You leave me no other alternative. The court at this time will fix next Friday, January sixth at ten a. m. as [the] day for passing sentence. The prisoner is remanded to the city jail. The jury is dismissed.

SFX:

GAVEL BANGS ONCE

MFX:

BRIDGE

SFX:

JAIL DOOR OPENS

MATRON:

Mr. Sargent to see you, Miss Leander.

LEE:

All right.

MATRON:

(OFF) This way, Mr. Sargent. Ten minutes.

JOHN:

Thanks.

SFX:

JOHN'S FOOTSTEPS TO CELL ... JAIL DOOR CLOSES

LEE:

Hello.

JOHN:

Do you realize what you've done?

LEE:

Yes.

JOHN:

Do you realize it can't be undone?

LEE:

Yes.

JOHN:

You understand there's no appeal? Nothing but jail?

LEE:

How long will I get?

JOHN:

Oh, how do I know? Maybe not very long, but if - if you'd kept your trap shut, you wouldn't be in here at all.

LEE:

There wasn't anything else to do. You're so strong, and you argue so well, and I - I love you so much.

JOHN:

Yeah, you certainly proved that.

LEE:

I'd always do what you wanted, even if it wasn't good for you. I'd never have a chance against you. And you'd never have a chance with me, like-- Well, like just now when you were trying to lose the case. Oh, aren't you ashamed?

JOHN:

Oh, stop it. Oh, I know what you were trying to do. Save little Jackie's career from the bad, bad woman. Don't you think I'm the best judge of what's good for me, and what I want most in this world?

LEE:

No.

JOHN:

And while you were making your big gesture, did you stop to think how much you'd be hurting me? Do you think I'll stop loving you just because they lock you up with a bunch of hoodlums and hopheads for the next few years?

LEE:

I'm not much better.

JOHN:

Well, you were good enough for me.

MFX:

SNEAKS IN ... ROMANTIC ... CONTINUES IN BG

LEE:

Will you - will you come and see me sometime?

JOHN:

Come and see ya? I'm going to send for the judge and marry ya right this minute.

LEE:

(EXHALES, OVERCOME) Oh. Oh, no. Thanks, but -- if you still wanted me afterwards-- (CHUCKLES) You'd be a sucker if you did, but-- If you did, it wouldn't be the same. I'd be all square and - and you would have had plenty of time to think things over.

JOHN:

I don't have to think. I'll be waiting for you, Lee. No matter how long it is, I'll be waiting.

LEE:

(TEARFUL) Jack, will you stand beside me and hold my hand when I'm sentenced?

JOHN:

You know I will.

LEE:

Then I won't be afraid. It'll be kind of like a marriage at that, won't it? And the - the other part won't be so bad, or so long -- with your voice always in my ear, your smile always before my eyes, and the - the feel of your hand always in mine.

JOHN:

(SOFTLY) Oh, Lee.

LEE:

(CRYING) I love you so. I love you so.

MFX:

UP, TO A FINISH

SFX:

APPLAUSE

DEMILLE:

Lee Leander and John Sargent will meet again in the not-too-distant future. Right now, we meet Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray again as they take a curtain call.

STANWYCK:

C. B., I think Fred ought to run for District Attorney. A jury would be putty in his hands.

MACMURRAY:

Ah, not me, Barbara. I'd be scared to death making speeches in front of a lot of people.

DEMILLE:

You'd get over that, Fred. There's a trick to it. You pick out one person in the audience and talk to him. Forget about the crowd.

MACMURRAY:

Oh, that doesn't work, C. B.

STANWYCK:

Oh, you can't be sure until you try.

MACMURRAY:

I've tried it. You know, I used to play the saxophone in an orchestra.

STANWYCK:

Why, that's nothing to be ashamed of Fred.

MACMURRAY:

You never heard me play the saxophone. Well, what I was going to tell you is that whenever one of us did a solo, we had to stand up. But I couldn't do it because I was so scared my teeth chattered. You ever play the saxophone with your teeth chattering, C. B.?

DEMILLE:

Fred - Fred, I'm ashamed to say I've never played a saxophone. With or without my teeth chattering.

MACMURRAY:

Well, somebody told me about that trick of looking at one person and forgetting about the crowd. So, one night when my saxophone solo came along, I picked out a girl that was dancing just in front of the orchestra and I played the saxophone right to her.

STANWYCK:

Did it work?

MACMURRAY:

No. She stuck her tongue out at me.

STANWYCK:

(LAUGHS)

MACMURRAY:

Guess she must have been a music lover.

STANWYCK:

Well, seriously, Fred, I enjoyed doing "Remember the Night" with you, both for the screen and here in the Lux Radio Theatre this week. And now I - I want to say just a word about Lux Soap. I think it's a grand complexion care. I - I wouldn't be surprised if I'd said something like that before, C. B., but it's still true because I still use Lux Soap just as I have for years.

DEMILLE:

I'll never get tired of hearing you say that, Barbara.

STANWYCK:

What's the play for next week, C. B.?

DEMILLE:

Next Monday night, our play is the great motion picture hit "Love Affair." And our stars will be Irene Dunne and William Powell. "Love Affair," produced by Leo McCarey for RKO, is one of the finest love stories the screen has given us in many years. A drama that begins on shipboard and ends-- Well, I'll leave that for next Monday night, when we'll have William Powell and Irene Dunne as the lovers in our production of "Love Affair."

MACMURRAY:

I'll take two seats on the living room aisle for that one, C. B. Good night.

STANWYCK:

Good night.

DEMILLE:

Good night.

SFX:

APPLAUSE

DEMILLE:

Good night. The jury finds you both guilty -- of a great performance.

MFX:

THEME ... CONTINUES IN BG

DEMILLE:

Our sponsors, the makers of Lux Toilet Soap, join me in inviting you to be with us again next Monday night, when the Lux Radio Theatre presents Irene Dunne and William Powell in "Love Affair." This is Cecil B. DeMille saying good night to you from Hollywood.

SFX:

APPLAUSE

MFX:

THEME ... UP AND OUT

ANNOUNCER:

Heard in tonight's play were Lou Merrill as O'Leary; Jack Carr as Rufus; John Fee as Judge; Edward Marr as Tom; Wally Maher as District Attorney; Celeste Rush as Mother; Arthur Q. Bryan as Mike; Walter White as Clerk; Sidney Newman as Cassidy; Ann Lee as Secretary; and Warren Rock as a policeman. Our music was directed by Louis Silvers and your announcer has been Melville Ruick.

SFX:

APPLAUSE

MFX:

THEME ... CONTINUES IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.

SFX:

APPLAUSE CONTINUES TO END

MFX:

LUX THEME CONTINUES TO END