Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Miscellaneous Single Episodes
Show: Reader's Digest Radio Edition: The Gift of the Magi
Date: Mar 20 1947

CAST:
ANNOUNCER
HOST, Richard Kollmer
DELLA / GENE TIERNEY
JIM, her husband
MRS. MALONE, cynical
1ST VOICE (2 lines)
2ND VOICE (1 line)
3RD VOICE (1 line)
4TH VOICE (1 line)
MADAME SOFRONIE
MERCER

ANNOUNCER:

Remember! A Hallmark Card will best express your perfect taste, your thoughtfulness!

MUSIC:

GRANDIOSE FANFARE

ANNOUNCER:

The makers of Hallmark Greeting Cards bring you a story by one of America's best-loved writers, O. Henry, starring one of America's most glamorous actresses, Miss Gene Tierney!

MUSIC:

THEME ... THEN IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

For more than a third of a century, quality has been a habit with the makers of Hallmark Cards. They have the pride of craftsmen in their name -- H-A-L-L-M-A-R-K -- Hallmark. That's why Hallmark Cards are the kind of cards you can be proud to send, proud to receive. So when you want to send the very finest, look on the back for those three identifying words, "A Hallmark Card." Those three words -- "A Hallmark Card" -- are your assurance of finest quality. They tell your friends you cared enough to send the very best. To be doubly sure, always look on the back of the card you choose for those three identifying words, "A Hallmark Card." Now, to preside over our program this evening, here's our regular master of ceremonies, the young Broadway actor and producer, Richard Kollmer.

MUSIC:

UP ... THEN OUT

HOST:

Thank you, Tom Shirley, and good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Tonight, the makers of Hallmark Greeting Cards have a rich surprise package for you. Not only will you hear one of the most famous love stories in the world, but a star whose beauty and glamour is as well-known as the story itself. O. Henry, who wrote the story, liked beautiful women. We think he would be more than pleased to see Gene Tierney in the role of Della. Welcome, Gene, and greetings.

TIERNEY:

Greetings to you, Dick, or shall I say it with a Hallmark Card?

HOST:

You couldn't do better.

TIERNEY:

You know, I'm really thrilled to be doing this O. Henry story. It's one of my favorites.

HOST:

Say, Gene, do you happen to know how O. Henry came to write it?

TIERNEY:

I read that in the Reader's Digest. Wasn't that the time that O. Henry was so late with his story that the illustrator came 'round to find out what he was doing?

HOST:

That's right. And, as usual, O. Henry hadn't even started. Nor did he have the faintest idea what to write. But the illustrator told him that he just had to start work that very day.

TIERNEY:

I remember. So, without any idea for a story, O. Henry began to think about the picture.

HOST:

He finally said, "Tell you what you do, just draw a picture of a poorly-furnished room -- with a chair, a trunk, a chest of drawers, and a bed. In the room, a man and a girl are sitting talking. The man has a watch fob in his hand. The girl-- Well, the girl has, uh, beautiful long hair down her back."

TIERNEY:

It was the most beautiful long hair in the world.

HOST:

Yes, that was the picture. O. Henry said, "That's all I can think of now. The story is coming." (TO THE AUDIENCE) Yes, the story is coming, just as it came out of that picture that O. Henry outlined -- the girl, the boy, and the poorly-furnished room. The makers of Hallmark Greeting Cards present -- on the Reader's Digest Radio Edition -- a story that grows out of that picture, starring Miss Gene Tierney.

MUSIC:

FOR AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

HOST:

Jim and Della Young weren't thinking about the date now, even though it was the day of their first wedding anniversary in Nineteen Hundred and Five. In their small, one-room furnished apartment, Jim was hurrying through breakfast and Della was deep in a pile of unpaid bills. [X]

SOUND:

BREAKFAST TABLE DISHES, UTENSILS

JIM:

(SOBER) Having trouble with those bills, honey?

DELLA:

A little.

JIM:

Mm hm.

DELLA:

I shouldn't have bought a chicken for tonight, but it's our first anniversary and I just wanted you to have something you like. This anniversary means so much to us.

JIM:

Does it still, Della? I don't see how it can to you -- with what you have to put up with around here.

DELLA:

(SURPRISED) Jim!

JIM:

Scrimping, saving, wondering how you're gonna pay the bills. This isn't the kind of life I wanted you to have, honey.

DELLA:

It's a wonderful life, darling. "Mr. and Mrs. James Dillingham Young" -- that's us, darling. Us.

JIM:

It's us, all right. And what've we got?

DELLA:

A lot of things, Mr. James Dillingham Young. You've got me and - and I've got you. That's all I want.

JIM:

I know, honey, but I want something more for you. That's why it breaks my heart to see you in a place like this.

DELLA: I love you--

JIM:

You should have a palace and all the lovely things a beautiful woman deserves.

DELLA:

I love you, Jim.

JIM:

You're not listening to me, Della.

DELLA:

You're not listening to me. I said, "I love you," darling.

JIM:

Ah, you're an angel, sweetheart. And if you didn't have such long wonderful hair, I'd send you right back to Heaven. Only I need you right here.

DELLA:

Jim?

JIM:

What? Don't you like me to kiss your hair?

DELLA:

You know I do, darling. But it's almost nine o'clock and--

JIM:

Holy mackerel! I've gotta get out of here. Bye, sweetheart.

DELLA:

Goodbye, darling. And keep smiling. Today's our anniversary, dear.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

DOORBELL RINGS

DELLA:

(CALLS) Just a minute!

SOUND:

DELLA'S FOOTSTEPS TO DOOR WHICH OPENS

DELLA:

Oh, good morning, Mrs. Malone.

MALONE:

Good mornin', dear. Just come across the hall to pay you back that cup of flour I borrowed Tuesday. Ya busy?

DELLA:

No. Come in and stay a while.

MALONE:

Thank ye.

SOUND:

MRS. MALONE'S FOOTSTEPS IN ... DOOR SHUTS

DELLA:

I was just in the kitchen counting up the money I've saved for Jim's anniversary present. My glory. After six months of arguing with butchers and bakers and getting pennies back from the milkman, all I've got is a dollar eighty-seven. Do you think I can get anything decent for that?

MALONE:

Not these days. Why does have to be anything decent? It's only for your husband. ...

DELLA:

Well, that's just it. Jim has being feeling so bad about us just lately, I'd rather not get him anything cheap. It'll just remind him of-- Well, of so many things he wishes he could change.

MALONE:

Hmmmm.

DELLA:

Besides, I want Jim to have something really fine. Something in silver maybe. Like that wonderful watch his grandfather left him.

MALONE:

For a dollar eighty-seven?

DELLA:

Oh, it's - it's silly I suppose, but - but that watch makes him feel like somebody. And it's so important for him to know how much I really love him.

MALONE:

My gosh almighty, it ain't decent for a woman to love a man like that. Here, you'd better borrow a couple of dollars from me before you break my heart.

DELLA:

Oh, I couldn't take any money from you, Mrs. Malone.

MALONE:

Goodness sake, why not?

DELLA:

I couldn't pay it back.

MALONE:

Well, you'll never get what you're lookin' for for a dollar eighty-seven.

DELLA:

I've got to, Mrs. Malone. I've just got to ---- if I have to search all over town!

MUSIC:

FOR A SHOPPING MONTAGE ... CONTINUES IN BG

1ST VOICE:

Under two dollars? Why, yes, ma'am, we have some very nice razor blades for a dollar fifty.

DELLA:

Razor blades?

1ST VOICE:

The new safety kind -- no honing, no stropping, no preparations of any kind. And the razor itself sells for only two seventy-five.

DELLA:

Oh, uh, no, thank you.

MUSIC:

UP, FOR PUNCTUATION ... THEN IN BG

2ND VOICE:

Of course, it isn't sterling silver, madame, but nobody would ever know the difference. What's more, it's guaranteed not to peel off for at least a year.

DELLA:

(WINCES) Uh, no, thank you.

MUSIC:

UP, FOR PUNCTUATION ... THEN IN BG

3RD VOICE:

(UNSYMPATHETIC) I'm sorry, madame, but for a dollar eighty-seven, what did you expect to find?

MUSIC:

UP, FOR PUNCTUATION AND A BRIEF BRIDGE ... THEN OUT

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS

MALONE:

Hello, Miz Young.

DELLA:

(DEJECTED) Oh, hello, Mrs. Malone.

SOUND:

DOOR SHUTS

MALONE:

Any luck, girl? Did you find anything?

DELLA:

Well---- No. Not very much. The only thing I really liked was a watch chain at Mercer's gift shop. (DREAMY) It would have been perfect for Jim. The right size, the right design, and it was sterling silver, too.

MALONE:

Well, why didn't you buy it?

DELLA:

The price was twenty-three dollars.

MALONE:

Ohhh. (BEAT) Anything in our range?

DELLA:

Jim should have that chain! It's so right for him.

MALONE:

The one that costs twenty-three dollars? Are you crazy?

DELLA:

No. I can get the money somehow. I can - I can sell something. My coat or - or something around the house.

MALONE:

What? You don't own anything but a couple of knives and forks; and that coat ain't worth ten dollars.

DELLA:

Well, there must be something.

MALONE:

Wait a second! I've got an idea! Madame Sofronie!

DELLA:

Who's she?

MALONE:

The hairdresser. She makes wigs and transformations and things. She might give you twenty dollars.

DELLA:

What for?

MALONE:

Your hair! I think she pays about a dollar an inch.

DELLA:

Oh, no! I couldn't sell my hair!

MALONE:

Well, why not? I've done it myself when things were bad, and the old man never even noticed it. ...

DELLA:

Oh, Jim would. He loves my hair; he - he's told me so a thousand times.

MALONE:

Well, I don't blame him for admiring it. I wish I had a crop like yours. But it's still only hair -- and it didn't cost ya nothin' to grow it. ...

DELLA:

But I've never cut it before. It - it's been growing this way ever since I was a little girl.

MALONE:

Well, you do just as you please, dearie, but twenty bucks is twenty bucks. And I don't know any other way of gettin' it.

DELLA:

(BEAT, TENTATIVE) Mrs. Malone? How close would it be cut? I mean, how much of it would I have left?

MALONE:

That's up to you and Madame Sofronie. She won't scalp you, ya know.

DELLA:

But would she pay me right away?

MALONE:

As soon as she's got the hair. Everything is on a cash basis.

DELLA:

And if I went up there now, I could get the watch chain this afternoon!

MALONE:

Just in time.

DELLA:

Oh, Lord, I - I don't know what to do. If I could only ask Jim before I had it done.

MALONE:

Why don't ya?

DELLA:

Oh, I can't! He - he'd never let me go through with it.

MALONE:

Then maybe you'd better forget about the whole thing.

DELLA:

(BEAT, DETERMINED) No. I'm going to do it. Jim's going to have that chain if I have to sell every hair on my head! (TENTATIVE) Only--

MALONE:

What?

DELLA:

(QUIETLY) I've got to see him just once more -- like this.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

OFFICE BACKGROUND ... TYPEWRITERS, MURMUR OF WORKERS, ET CETERA

4TH VOICE:

Your wife is here, Mr. Young.

JIM:

What? Where?

DELLA:

Right here. I - I hope I'm not disturbing you, Jim.

JIM:

(CONCERNED) Why - why, no, honey. What's wrong?

DELLA:

Nothing. I - I just came up to see you for a little while.

JIM:

See me? 'Bout what?

DELLA:

Oh, it wasn't anything in particular. I - I just wanted to look at you and to talk to you.

JIM:

Well, it's the first time you've ever come up to the office, Dell. Are you sure there's nothing wrong?

DELLA:

Not a thing, darling. Can't you tell? Don't I look all right?

JIM:

Well, you look lovely, dear, but then, you always do.

DELLA:

Jim?

JIM:

Yes, sweetheart?

DELLA:

I was thinking of doing my hair over in a different style. For our anniversary, darling.

JIM:

Oh, no. No, I like it just the way it is, Dell.

DELLA:

But you've never seen it any other way.

JIM:

I've seen it down, all combed out and hanging down over your shoulders. I like it best that way, honey. So long and soft; it's - it's like a cape of the finest material ever made.

DELLA:

(PLEASED) You like my hair, don't you, Jim?

JIM:

I love your hair, darling.

DELLA:

Well, I - I guess I won't do it over then.

JIM:

Course not, Dell. I like you just the way you are now. Only I don't think we'd better stand here and talk much longer; Mr. Claney is looking over.

DELLA:

Oh, all right, Jim. I'll be going. (PLAYFUL) What time is it?

JIM:

(EVASIVE BUT CASUAL) Oh, uh ---- 'bout twelve o'clock.

DELLA:

(SURPRISED) About twelve o'clock? Haven't you got your watch with you, dear?

JIM:

(SHEEPISH) Yes, yes, I've - I've got it. I - just don't like to look at in the office.

DELLA:

Why, Jim -- I thought you were so proud of that watch.

JIM:

I am, honey. I'm very proud of the watch. It's - it's the fob I don't like people to see. This old leather fob looks as if I found it in the street.

DELLA:

What do you mean?

JIM:

Well, look at it, Dell. It's all scraped and shabby-looking. Why, a watch like this should have a chain.

DELLA:

(INSPIRED) Yes. A nice silver chain.

JIM:

(CHUCKLES) What are you talking about, Dell?

DELLA:

Nothing, I - I was just dreaming out loud; for you.

JIM:

(WRY) Well, you'd better not dream in silver, honey. The way things have been going lately, we'll never be able to afford anything but tin.

DELLA:

(CERTAINTY, STARTS TO MOVE OFF) You'll do better than that, Jim. I'll see that you do better.

JIM:

Now wait a minute, Dell. What are you running away for?

DELLA:

Well, I - I don't want you to get in trouble with your boss, dear. Besides, I've got to make a date with a woman named Sofronie!

MUSIC:

CURTAIN

ANNOUNCER:

Gene Tierney will be back in just a moment with the second act of tonight's drama, sponsored by Hallmark Greeting Cards from the pages of the Reader's Digest, America's favorite magazine. Now, here's Dick Kollmer.

HOST:

Two generations of writers have come and gone since Charles Dickens laid down his pen, yet the characters we meet in his novels seem as real today as when they were first created. How could one man gain such an understanding of human nature? How could he learn to write with such skill? Charles Dickens was asked that one day and he replied, "Whatever I have tried to do, I tried with all my heart to do well."

Some of us are fortunate enough to know people like that, people who do their work with a quiet determination to give it their very best. You'll find this spirit among the folks who make Hallmark Cards. They're not just making cards, they're making Hallmark Cards to express cheer and happiness as genuinely and sincerely as you would greet a friend yourself. Yes, you'll find Hallmark Cards say what you want to say -- the way you want to say it.

For more than a third of a century, quality has been a habit with the makers of Hallmark Cards. That's why discriminating folks look on the back of the cards they send and receive for the three identifying words, "A Hallmark Card." Those three words -- "A Hallmark Card" -- are your assurance of finest quality. They tell your friends you cared enough to send the very best.

MUSIC:

FOR AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]

HOST:

Della Young had a priceless possession to offer her husband, but the long, rippling cascade of hair that she was willing to sell for a watch chain had to be purchased first by a squat, dumpy-looking woman named Madame Sofronie. As the sign on the door of her second floor establishment read, "Madame Sofronie, Hairdresser -- Wigs, Transformations, Hair Goods of All Kinds, Bought and Sold." [X]

SOUND:

DELLA'S FOOTSTEPS UP WOODEN STEPS

HOST:

Della rushed up the single flight of stairs ...

SOUND:

KNOCK AT DOOR

HOST:

... knocked on the door. And, as she stood there nervously waiting for someone to answer, Madame Sofronie herself obliged.

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS

SOFRONIE:

Yeeeessss?!

DELLA:

Madame Sofronie?

SOFRONIE:

That's right.

DELLA:

Will you look at my hair?

SOFRONIE:

What for?

DELLA:

Well, I - I want to sell it.

SOFRONIE:

Oh! Oh, come on in, yes, come in.

DELLA:

Thank you.

SOUND:

DOOR SHUTS

DELLA:

Will you buy it? How much will you pay me for it?

SOFRONIE:

Now, now, wait a minute. Take off your hat -- and let's have a sight at the looks of it first.

DELLA:

Oh, it's good hair. I mean, it's in good condition. I've always kept it that way.

SOFRONIE:

Mmm hmm. How much have ya got?

DELLA:

Well, how much do you want?

SOFRONIE:

No, no, no, you didn't understand me. Uh, take it down. I want to see how long it is.

DELLA:

Well, it comes down to about here.

SOFRONIE:

Mmmmm. Mm hm. Never had it cut before, huh?

DELLA:

No.

SOFRONIE:

Well, now, don't be frightened. I'm not gonna hurt ya.

DELLA:

Oh, thank you.

SOFRONIE:

Mmmmm. Mm hm. Mm. I'll give you twenty dollars for the whole head.

DELLA:

The whole head?! Down to the bone?! ...

SOFRONIE:

No. No, no, no, I don't want the shorts. I only buy the full-lengths.

DELLA:

Well, how much will you have to cut off?

SOFRONIE:

Ohhhh, up to about here.

DELLA:

(SHOCKED) That short?

SOFRONIE:

Well, I can take less, but of course, I'd have to pay ya less, too.

DELLA:

(FIRM) No. I need more.

SOFRONIE:

More I can't pay ya.

DELLA:

But it isn't enough! The chain costs twenty-three dollars and I've only got a dollar eighty-seven.

SOFRONIE:

Huh?

DELLA:

The least I can sell it for is twenty-one dollars and thirteen cents. That's what you'll have to pay for my hair.

SOFRONIE:

I'll give ya twenty dollars.

DELLA:

No, I want twenty-one thirteen -- or you don't get a strand of it.

SOFRONIE:

Are you crazy? What kind of a price is twenty-one dollars and thirteen cents?

DELLA:

Well, that's the price it's got to be!

SOFRONIE:

Oh, all right, all right. Now, don't bite my head off. I'll give it to ya.

DELLA:

When?

SOFRONIE:

Right now. (MOVING OFF) Just sit down in that chair, I'll get it for ya.

SOUND:

CASH REGISTER RINGS, FROM OFF

DELLA:

(WEAKLY) Are you - are you going to cut it now?

SOFRONIE:

(OFF) Mm hmm. Just as soon as I give you the money.

SOUND:

CASH REGISTER DRAWER SHUTS

SOFRONIE:

(CLOSER) Here ya are, girlie. That's twenty. One. Uh, ten, thir-- Twenty-one thirteen, right?

DELLA:

(TEARFUL) Right. Now you can go ahead and do it. Only - only, for heaven's sakes, do it quick.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

CLIP-CLIP-CLIP OF SCISSORS ... THEN IN BG

DELLA:

Good glory! Aren't ya finished yet?

SOFRONIE:

Yeah, I'm finished; I'm just kinda cleanin' up the loose ends, that's all. You don't want to go out of here lookin' like a man, do ya? (HOOTS WITH LAUGHTER)

DELLA:

No.

SOFRONIE:

Well, then, don't be in such a hurry.

SOUND:

FINAL CLIP-CLIP-CLIP OF SCISSORS

SOFRONIE:

There we are; that looks better now. Well, you wanna see it?

DELLA:

I don't know. I - I feel like a plucked chicken!

SOFRONIE:

Oh, don't be silly. You don't look so bad. Here, take this mirror; have a look at yourself. (NO RESPONSE) Well, you gotta do it sometime.

DELLA:

(RELUCTANT) All right. I'll look.

SOFRONIE:

(BEAT) Well?

DELLA:

(TRAUMATIZED) It's - awful.

SOFRONIE:

Hmmm?

DELLA:

Awful! I look as if I've been skinned alive!

SOFRONIE:

Oh, nonsense. They all feel that way in the beginning. Then, after a while, they get to kinda like it short.

DELLA:

(DESPAIR) No. I'll never like it this way. Neither will he.

SOFRONIE:

Well, of course, if you want me to fix you up with a few curls and a kind of a wave, I can make ya look real smart. But it'll cost ya three dollars.

DELLA:

I'll curl it myself!

SOFRONIE:

Hey, where you going?! You'll catch cold if you run out in the street right away.

DELLA:

Don't try to stop me, will ya? It's half-past four! I've got just thirty minutes to get over to Mercer's gift shop!

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

SHOP DOOR OPENS, BELL RINGS

MERCER:

Yes, ma'am? Can I help you?

SOUND:

SHOP DOOR SHUTS

DELLA:

(BREATHLESS) The watch chain! The silver one! Have you still got it?!

MERCER:

Watch chain?

DELLA:

The one I looked at this morning. Don't you remember? I told you I was crazy about it.

MERCER:

Madame, I've never seen you before in my life.

DELLA:

(PANICS) Oh, for heaven's sakes! Where is it?! Did you put it aside for me?

MERCER:

Well, I did put a watch chain aside for a young lady that was in here earlier today, but she had-- (STOPS SHORT)

DELLA:

(BEAT, WITH DREAD) What? (BEAT) What did she have?

MERCER:

My goodness, it is you. I didn't recognize you without your-- I mean, you look so different.

DELLA:

Is it that bad, Mr. Mercer?

MERCER:

Bad? Why, of course not. Here, the watch chain is right over here.

DELLA:

Oh, thank heaven you've still got it!

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

DOORBELL RINGS

DELLA:

Yes?! Who is it?!

MALONE:

Me, dearie! I just wondered if you got back all right.

DELLA:

Yes, I'm back.

MALONE:

Well, open the door and let me see what you look like!

SOUND:

DOOR OPENS

MALONE:

(BEAT) Hmmmmmm! ...

DELLA:

Is it awful, Mrs. Malone? Tell me -- is it as bad as I think it is?

SOUND:

DOOR SHUTS

MALONE:

Oh, I don't know. I've seen worse sights in my day. It could stand a little fixin', though. You, uh, you got a curlin' iron handy?

DELLA:

Yes, on the stove. I've been using it for the last ten minutes.

MALONE:

Well, now, you need a few more of them loose curls in the front and on the side. (UNENTHUSIASTIC) Otherwise, you're - you're all right.

DELLA:

I don't look like a Coney Island chorus girl, do I?

MALONE:

What's so bad about chorus girls? I wish I looked like one. ...

DELLA:

But Jim'll have a fit if I--

MALONE:

(DISMISSIVE) Jim, Jim, Jim -- it's too bad about him. Now where's this present you made so much fuss about?

DELLA:

Here. I haven't wrapped it up yet.

MALONE:

Hmm. Twenty-three dollars for a doo-hinky like this? Gosh almighty, what's the world comin' to?

DELLA:

Isn't it beautiful, Mrs. Malone?

MALONE:

Ain't as beautiful as your hair.

DELLA:

(TEARFUL) Don't say that. Please.

MALONE:

Well, it ain't. You ought to have your head examined for givin' up so much for that husband of yours. Goodness sakes, I wouldn't sell the ends of my fingernails for that man o' mine. ...

DELLA:

(KNOWINGLY) You wouldn't part with him, either -- for anything in the world.

MALONE:

Well---- Maybe not. Still I can't see why you had to spend so much on a darned ol' watch chain.

DELLA:

He'll be proud of it, Mrs. Malone. He'll be proud of his watch, his chain, and himself, too. Wait and see. It'll make him very happy. And that's all I care about it.

MALONE:

Well, if you want to make him happy, I suppose you're right. Only, I'd better to get to work on your hair. He'll be home for dinner pretty soon.

DELLA:

My glory! Yes! It's six o'clock!

MALONE:

Now, now, don't worry. There's plenty of time.

DELLA:

Do you think it'll look all right after you fix it?

MALONE:

Sure, sure. He won't even know the difference.

DELLA:

(DESPERATE PRAYER) Oh, Lord, please make him think I'm still pretty.

MUSIC:

BRIDGE

SOUND:

DOOR SHUTS

DELLA:

That you, darling?

JIM:

(CHEERFUL) That's me, honey! Full o' the joy of livin' and longin' for a kiss from the sweetest little woman in-- (STOPS SHORT, PAUSE, STUNNED WHISPER) Della?!

DELLA:

(MEEK) Yes, dear?

JIM:

(DISBELIEF) What have you done to yourself? What's happened to your hair?

DELLA:

(CASUAL, UPBEAT) Oh, I - I was hoping you wouldn't notice it so soon. I mean, I didn't have a chance to-- (STOPS SHORT, SAD) Oh, Jim. Don't look at me like that.

JIM:

But it's gone. Every bit of it's gone.

DELLA:

(CASUAL) Not every bit, darling. It - it really isn't as bad as it looks. And Madame Sofronie said quite a few women were wearing it shorter these days.

JIM:

Who's Madame Sofronie?

DELLA:

Well, she's the one who-- Jim, please. I - I can't talk to you if you don't stop looking like that.

JIM:

But it's gone, Della. You can't have it back once it's gone.

DELLA:

Darling, listen to me. I - I didn't have my hair cut off because I like it this way. I sold it, Jim.

JIM:

You--? You sold your hair?

DELLA:

Because I love you, darling. Because I couldn't have lived through this day without giving you a present.

JIM:

Sold it, Della?

DELLA:

It'll grow again. My hair grows awfully fast, Jim. Won't you just say "Happy anniversary" and stop acting as if I'd cut your heart out?

JIM:

I - I don't think I can say anything.

DELLA:

Why, dear? Why? Don't you like me any more? I'm still me without my hair.

JIM:

Yes, yes, I - I know, honey. I - just feel kind of numb all over.

DELLA:

Well, if that's all you're going to say, I - I'll get dinner ready.

JIM:

Oh, wait a minute, Dell. You've got the wrong idea.

DELLA:

Have I?

JIM:

There isn't anything in the way of a haircut or a shampoo or a wave that - that could make me love you any less. I'm proud of what you did, honey. I'm awful proud.

DELLA:

(LOVINGLY) Oh, Jim--

JIM: It-- Well, it just took me a long while to - to come to my senses. You don't understand why, but -- if you'll unwrap this package, I think you will.

DELLA:

What do you mean? What's in this package?

JIM:

(SLOWLY) Uh, a present.

DELLA:

For me?

JIM:

Course it's for you, sweetheart. You - didn't think I'd forget, did you?

DELLA:

No, but-- (GASPS, THRILLED) Oh! Darling! (PAUSE, QUIETLY) Combs. ... Combs to wear in my hair.

JIM:

Yeah. I didn't know you were gonna have it cut. I - kinda thought that - you might like 'em.

DELLA:

Oh, I do, Jim, I do! They're beautiful! Tortoise shell, and jeweled rims, and just the right shade. I - I've always wanted combs like these.

JIM:

Until tonight.

DELLA:

No -- tonight, too. My hair grows fast, Jim, and - and I'll wear them just for you some day.

JIM:

Thank you, sweetheart.

DELLA:

Don't feel bad, Jim. I've got such a wonderful surprise for you. I haven't shown you your present yet.

JIM:

Hm?

DELLA:

Look, darling. Pure sterling. Just like your watch. I hunted all over town to find it.

JIM:

You - you sold your hair to buy me this?

DELLA:

It was worth it, Jim. It was worth everything I own to give you this. Now you'll never be ashamed to tell the time to anyone any more.

JIM:

Dell, let's put our presents away and keep 'em for a while. They're too nice to use now.

DELLA:

No, please! Give me your watch, darling. I - I want to see how it looks with the chain on it.

JIM:

(WITH DIFFICULTY) But, Dell, I-- I haven't - haven't got the watch any more. I sold it this afternoon to buy you those combs.

DELLA:

You - you sold your watch?! The one you were so proud of?

JIM:

I had to. I needed the money to get you something nice.

DELLA:

(STARTS TO CRY) Oh, Jim! I've made such a mess of things! (SOBS)

JIM:

Oh, no, you haven't, sweetheart.

DELLA:

(MORE SOBS)

JIM:

This is the most wonderful anniversary we've ever had. Don't you see? We've - we've given each other the finest presents there are -- presents that no amount of money could buy.

DELLA:

(STOPS SOBBING) Our love?

JIM:

Our love. Everything, Dell.

DELLA:

And you're not sorry about the watch -- or my hair?

JIM:

Sorry, darling? Sorry because you made me the happiest man in the world? Honey, I never realized how much we had until just now. And now I'll never forget.

DELLA:

(EMOTIONAL) Oh, Jim. Put your arms around me. And don't ever take them away.

MUSIC:

CURTAIN

HOST:

Thank you, Gene Tierney; that was a thrilling performance.

ANNOUNCER:

Remember, when you want to greet a friend, send a Hallmark Card, for, whatever the occasion, a Hallmark Card will say what you want to say, the way you want to say it. So always look on the back of the card you choose for those three identifying words, "A Hallmark Card." Like the words "Sterling on silver," those three words -- "A Hallmark Card" -- are your assurance of finest quality. They tell your friends you cared enough to send the very best.

HOST:

Next week, Hallmark Greeting Cards will present the true story of a truly great American, Oliver Wendell Holmes. Our star will be that versatile performer of Broadway, Hollywood and the networks, Roger Pryor.

MUSIC:

THEME ... THEN IN BG, TILL END

ANNOUNCER:

Gene Tierney appeared through the courtesy of Twentieth Century-Fox and may soon be seen with Rex Harrison in "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir." Miss Tierney was supported by Bill Quinn in the role of Jim. Tonight's drama was adapted by Robert Sloane from "A Story for O. Henry" in the Reader's Digest, America's favorite magazine. The Hallmark Program was directed by Mark Sloane with music especially composed by Jack Miller.

To be doubly sure of the finest quality, always look on the back of your cards for those three identifying words, "A Hallmark Card."

This is Tom Shirley speaking for the makers of Hallmark Greeting Cards and for your friendly Hallmark dealer. You'll find a wide selection of Hallmark Cards at America's finest shops and stores. Remember, a Hallmark Card will best express your perfect taste, your thoughtfulness.

This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.