Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Amanda of Honeymoon Hill
Show: Two Distracted Grandmothers , ca 1940
Date: Date Unknown

Date Unknown, circa 1940

CAST:
ANNOUNCER
AMANDA DYKE LEIGHTON, beautiful but poor, uneducated and unworldly
EDWARD LEIGHTON, her classy, wealthy husband
MAUREEN DALE, the nurse
DORA COURTLEIGH, the not-so-wealthy grandmother
EUNICE POWELL, the wealthy grandmother

MUSIC:

ORGAN ... THEME ("Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes") ... IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

This is the story of a young man who married a girl who has nothing in life except her own beauty -- neither education nor background nor any real contact with the world. Her name was Amanda Dyke until Edward Leighton, a handsome young Southerner who lives in a mansion on the hill, married her and took her away from her strict father, who kept her close in their Virginia valley. This is the strange story of Edward and Amanda who now, in spite of the hatreds of both their families, seek happiness on Honeymoon Hill in Virginia, in a world that few Americans know.

MUSIC:

ORGAN OUT

ANNOUNCER:

This program is brought to you to announce a remedy for headache and other muscular aches and pains that does not cause stomach upset in the normal person. This preparation is called Cal-Aspirin and is a scientific combination of aspirin and the mineral calcium. It is now available at drugstores throughout the country. The Cal-Aspirin formula relieves a headache, neuritic and neuralgic pain, with great speed. Some of your own neighbors can probably vouch for this. It works very fast, you can be sure. But I do want to suggest to you that you ask your doctor about Cal-Aspirin, for he knows about the combination "aspirin plus calcium" and may prefer you to use it. It's record, especially in the Middle West, has been spectacular. So ask him about it and then try it and you'll say I'm a friend for suggesting it. Cal-Aspirin is sold on an unconditional money-back basis, incidentally, and costs very little. Get a tube at your drugstore today. Remember, it's aspirin plus calcium. C-A-L -- Cal; hyphen; aspirin. Be careful you get the real thing -- Cal-Aspirin, in the black-and-yellow tube.

MUSIC:

ORGAN ... THEME ("Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes") ... THEN IN BG, FADES OUT BEHIND--

ANNOUNCER:

And now, our drama, "Amanda of Honeymoon Hill." When Amanda brought the Courtleigh baby home from the hospital, she didn't foresee that Eunice Powell, Olive's mother, would arrive at Honeymoon House with the statement that she would take the child to live with her. She couldn't foresee that Walter's mother, Dora Courtleigh, would give up her apartment and keep house for Walter and look after the baby. And no one dreamed that Olive's family would feel so bitterly toward Walter. The last twenty minutes have been frantic ones. Maureen Dale, the pretty nurse whom Edward engaged for the baby, has been told by Mrs. Powell to pack the baby's things. Right now, Amanda and Edward are in the studio. One minute and thirty seconds ago, Walter dashed from the room to stop his mother before she could reach Honeymoon House. Amanda is saying--

AMANDA:

Now, Edward -- Walter's gone outdoors to stop his mother from comin' here. Hadn't I better go upstairs and tell Olive's mother to leave?

EDWARD:

No, you can't ask her to leave, darling. We'll have to tell her simply that Walter's decided that the baby will stay with us for the next few days.

AMANDA:

And then she'll leave?

EDWARD:

Well -- we hope that she won't insist on taking Little Olive with her.

AMANDA:

Well, we'll just have to be firm and say that she cain't take her.

EDWARD:

Well, Walter is the child's father. If his mother intends keeping house for him and they can look after the baby, then they're the ones who should take her.

AMANDA:

Well, then let's just tell Mrs. Powell that.

EDWARD:

(SIGHS) Oh, no, no. We can't do that. Besides, I feel awfully sorry for Mrs. Powell.

AMANDA:

Oh, yes. Yes. Because of Olive. But, darlin', we can talk about that forever but we've got to stop Mrs. Powell from takin' Little Olive out'n this house!

MISS DALE:

(OFF) Mrs. Leighton?

AMANDA:

Oh, yes, Miss Dale?

MISS DALE:

(CLOSER) Mrs. Powell is ready to leave.

AMANDA:

Oh, she cain't leave until I talk to her again.

EDWARD:

Where's the baby, Miss Dale?

MISS DALE:

She's downstairs; I've just brought her down.

AMANDA:

Oh, dear! Edward, what'll we do?

EDWARD:

Miss Dale, go back to Mrs. Powell and under no circumstances let her leave this house before we talk to her.

MISS DALE:

(MOVING OFF) I understand, Mr. Leighton, and I won't.

AMANDA:

Oh, darlin', shouldn't we tell Miss Dale to take Little Olive back upstairs?

EDWARD:

Oh, I don't know--

DORA:

(OFF) Edward? Eunice is still here, isn't she?

EDWARD:

(SURPRISED) Oh, Mrs. Courtleigh!

AMANDA:

Why, Mrs. Courtleigh, I thought Walter had explained to you that you weren't to come!

DORA:

(MOVES ON) But tell me. Please tell me. Eunice Powell hasn't left with the baby, has she?

AMANDA:

No. No, she hain't.

EDWARD:

No, she's still here, Mrs. Courtleigh. And, under the circumstances, we thought you wouldn't want to see her.

DORA:

I do want to see her, Edward. I told Walter that no problem is ever solved by running away from it. I want to talk to Eunice. I know what she's feeling. But she has no reason to be so high-handed about Walter's child.

EUNICE:

Oh?! High-handed, Dora?! Is that what you call it?

AMANDA:

Oh, Mrs. Powell. Well, come in, won't you? Sit down.

EDWARD:

Yes, please do, Mrs. Powell.

EUNICE:

Thank you, Amanda; Edward. But I won't sit down. I'm waiting for Dora to explain.

DORA:

Eunice, I'm not sorry you overheard my remark. I don't understand your attitude.

EUNICE:

You said the baby is Walter's child. The baby is the child of my daughter who died to give her birth. Of my daughter! Who never even saw her baby.

DORA:

Oh, believe me, Eunice, I regret Olive's death deeply. I loved her. She was Walter's wife. I've tried to tell you before how I feel about it.

EUNICE:

Yes! Yes, Dora -- so you have. But there's nothing you can say.

AMANDA:

Well, now, truly, Mrs. Powell -- and Mrs. Courtleigh, too -- all the weepin' an' all the sorrow on Earth cain't bring Olive back. And we all loved her. And the one thing each of us can be sartain of is that she'd want our main concern to be her baby.

EUNICE:

And my main concern is her baby, Amanda.

DORA:

And so is mine, Amanda. But Walter's my son, and he wants his child with him.

EUNICE:

Olive was my daughter, and her baby should be with me!

EDWARD:

Oh, look, this isn't my affair, of course, and I've no right to express an opinion, but wouldn't it be better for us to sit down and talk quietly? I'm certain that neither of you -- Mrs. Powell nor Mrs. Courtleigh -- want to make an issue of it.

DORA:

Above everything on Earth, I don't want to make an issue of it. Eunice and I have been friends all our lives. I'm grieved -- I'm horribly grieved that she should speak to me as she has.

AMANDA:

Oh, now, Mrs. Courtleigh--

DORA:

To even imply that I'm not heartbroken over Olive--

EUNICE:

I didn't imply that, Dora! I'm sure that you loved Olive, but it's absurd for anyone to think that you feel as I do. And I can't help blaming Walter. I'm sorry, but I - I can't help it.

DORA:

You're unjust to Walter. He adored her! He simply adored her!

EUNICE:

He took her on a vacation trip to Canada! He let her travel continually. And just before she went to the hospital, he allowed her to go on a picnic -- where she stumbled and fell!

AMANDA:

Oh, please, please -- both of you, stop!

DORA:

But how can Eunice say such things?! It wasn't Walter's fault! Olive insisted on going to Canada! And on the picnic! He's been wretched, poor boy. He blames himself.

AMANDA:

Mrs. Powell, Walter blamed himself so much that he couldn't bring himself to even look at Little Olive for weeks after she was born.

EUNICE:

Exactly! Exactly! Walter knew that he'd failed to look after Olive! And he has no right to the child!

DORA:

He has a right! She's his child!

EDWARD:

Now, wait, wait. None of us wants things to be like this and we're all upset. Let's talk about it calmly.

AMANDA:

Mrs. Powell -- if'n I might jest say so -- you have your husband and Mrs. Courtleigh here's alone.

EUNICE:

(SCOFFS)

AMANDA:

She's aimin' to give up her apartment and keep house for Walter.

DORA:

Yes. That's what I'm planning to do. And I'm going to do it. It's unfair of you, Eunice, to refuse to understand Walter's position.

EUNICE:

Olive's father and I have discussed the matter thoroughly. And we both feel that Little Olive's place is with us. (BEAT) I don't like to mention money, Dora, but you know we're able to give her many more advantages than you and Walter are.

DORA:

And what do you call "advantages"?

EUNICE:

Servants, nurses. Later on, schools.

DORA:

And let me tell you, Eunice Powell, your people have always had more money than mine. But I attended the same schools that you did, our friends are the same, and as far as social position here at Abbeyville goes, well, my--

EDWARD:

Oh, please, please. You'll both regret saying these things later.

AMANDA:

And, as fer bringin' up a child, all that really matters is the proper care and love -- an' keepin' it to grow up into a rightly fine human bein' with courage to face the world and to take whatever comes.

EUNICE:

That's very well said, my dear. And Dora knows that I've no stupid values in life. But she also knows that Olive's child will inherit the fortune my husband has. And, in all justice, I should be allowed the happiness of bringing up her child.

DORA:

I can't feel that way about it, Eunice. It doesn't seem right to me.

EUNICE:

Well, Dora, I can't help that! It is right. And I'm here to take the baby and I intend doing it.

DORA:

No, you can't, Eunice. Now, please be reasonable. Olive herself would want Walter to have the baby. Forget that I have anything to do with it. I'm not quarreling with you over the possession of my grandchild.

EUNICE:

Our grandchild.

DORA:

(EXASPERATED) Ours; I meant ours.

EUNICE:

And you certainly are quarreling about her, Dora. I don't know what else to call it.

DORA:

Oh, it's all because you're so angry with Walter! That's the whole trouble. Ever since we got home and learned what had happened, you've been hysterical.

EUNICE: Isn't it natural that I'd be hysterical?

DORA:

Yes, yes, but you haven't tried to take it calmly. People have to endure tragedy; it comes to all of us.

EUNICE:

(INTENSE, STARTS TO CRACK) Do you think that I'll ever -- ever, as long as I live -- forgive myself for being away from Olive when she needed me most? And, except for her child, I'd wish we'd never gotten back from the trip. (BREAKS DOWN AND SOBS) Olive! My daughter.

AMANDA:

(COMFORTING) Oh, Mrs. Powell--

DORA:

(SOOTHING) Oh, Eunice. Eunice, I'm sorry. I'm so terribly sorry.

EDWARD:

Mrs. Powell, we all are.

EUNICE:

Of course, Edward; I know. Forgive me.

DORA:

I'd do anything on Earth for you, Eunice -- except agree that it's right for you to take Little Olive. I can't agree to that. I have to think of Walter.

EUNICE:

Well, I'll have a talk with Walter when I can bring myself to it. I - I'll explain why I took her home with me. I know he'll agree.

DORA:

Eunice, you shan't take her home with you.

EUNICE:

But--

DORA:

She's going with me!

EUNICE:

Now, Dora! Please don't argue with me. The nurse is downstairs with the baby now. My car is waiting. She is going home with me.

DORA:

No, she isn't! I mean it!

AMANDA:

Mrs. Courtleigh! And Mrs. Powell! Since you cain't agree, it might be better jest to quit tryin' fer the time bein'.

EDWARD:

Walter made a suggestion which I think is the only solution at present--

SOUND:

PHONE RINGS

EDWARD:

Oh. I'll get it.

SOUND:

PHONE RECEIVER UP

EDWARD:

Hello? ... Oh, yes, Walter. I'm awfully glad you called. ... Yes, they're both here. ... I was just getting ready to suggest-- ... Oh, yes, yes. I was just about to suggest it. ... Oh, I don't mind that part of it. ... Uh, yes. Right you are. Goodbye.

SOUND:

PHONE RECEIVER DOWN

EDWARD:

That was Walter. He wants the baby to stay with Amanda and me for the time being.

EUNICE:

Oh? He does?

EDWARD:

Yes, he - he telephoned just in the nick of time. I was just about to suggest that.

AMANDA:

Well, now, won't that be the best plan, Mrs. Powell?

DORA:

Well, I'm willing for her to stay here until we settle it.

EDWARD:

After all, Walter is the child's father and I'm sure that, in the last analysis, we have to agree that what he says goes.

AMANDA:

You think that's best, too, don't you, Mrs. Powell?

EUNICE:

Well, since - since Dora is so obstinate about it, I-- (EXHALES) Yes, I suppose it is best. Yes. Yes, Amanda, I'm willing that she stay here -- temporarily -- and I'll tell her nurse, Miss Dale, to unpack her things. (MOVING OFF) Oh, Miss Dale? Miss Dale?

MISS DALE:

(TO HERSELF) Oh! I just got out of the hall in time!

EUNICE:

(OFF) Miss Dale?

MISS DALE:

(TO HERSELF) Mrs. Powell's calling me and she almost found me listening at the studio door. But she's not apt to look for me in the music room. I'll wait here a few minutes and then go out.

Oh, what a conversation. Two women fighting over that baby. How'll they decide it? Neither one'll give in.

I suppose, according to law, that just as Edward Leighton said, whatever the father says goes.

I've an idea! I've a wonderful idea! I might be able to settle that baby question. But it depends first on myself. Next on Mr. Courtleigh -- and his cooperation.

MUSIC:

ORGAN ... THEME ("Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes") ... THEN IN BG

ANNOUNCER:

And when Maureen Dale, Olive's nurse, hears Mrs. Powell call again, she joins her. What is her plan, which will need Walter's cooperation? And what decision can Mrs. Powell and Mrs. Courtleigh -- each so determined to have the baby -- come to? Don't miss the next exciting chapter as Amanda, thinking only of Baby Olive, tries to help the two distracted grandmothers.

MUSIC:

ORGAN OUT

ANNOUNCER:

I have important news for everyone looking for a really fast way to relieve headache and pains of neuralgia and neuritis. You simply try the modern way to relief -- the way many doctors now advise. That is, aspirin combined with calcium! Until recent years, no calcium-aspirin combination was available to the general public. But now you can get it at your own drugstore under the name Cal-Aspirin -- the only tablets we know of combining aspirin with calcium that you can buy.

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MUSIC:

ORGAN ... TILL END