Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: Miscellaneous Single Episodes
Show: Tonight's Best Story: The Key
Date: Jun 11 1940

THE KEY
A DRAMA FOR WOMEN
BY HELEN DORE BOYLSTON
ADAPTED FOR RADIO BY EDWARD GOLDBERGER
(Produced by Peter Witt and Story Magazine over WHN, New York)
Here's a script from what seems to have been a well-regarded series that featured stories by name authors, either adaptations or originals, and sometimes literary figures appeared as guests. Several other scripts from this program were published in One Hundred Non-Royalty One-Act Plays, edited by William Kozlenko (New York, Greenberg 1940).

CAST:
MISS HANSON, the head nurse
JEAN BRADFORD, the new nurse
MRS. FIELD, a violent patient
MISS BROWN, a friendly nurse
MISS SPENCER, another patient
DR. GRESHAM

MISS HANSON:

You're the new nurse Dr. Gresham sent over, eh?

JEAN:

Yes, Miss Hanson.

HANSON:

Miss Bradford, that right? Never worked in a sanitarium before, I suppose.

JEAN:

No, Miss Hanson. I've had only the regular training up to this point, now I've been assigned to the sanitarium for the advanced course.

HANSON:

Well, we're short-handed here, as usual, and I won't have time to show you the ropes. I'll put you right to work . . . Go down to Mrs. Field's room and change the linens. They're in the closet. Here's your key . . . It's a pass key to all the doors. She may try to take it from you.

JEAN:

Mrs. Field? Is she an extreme case?

HANSON:

Yes. She gets violent occasionally. She's been here six months and seems to be getting worse all the time. And she doesn't like new nurses . . . Has an idea they want to kill her.

JEAN:

Then do you think it advisable that I should go?

HANSON:

I don't like to send you, but I haven't any one else at the moment. Don't let her get too close to you and whatever you do, don't turn your back on her. She may explode if you do . . . Maybe hurt you severely. You've got to be careful every second.

JEAN:

Are there many patients like that? How long does it take to get used to
that son of thing?

HANSON:

Well, Miss Bradford, that all depends on the person in question. Some people never get used to it. But people who are squeamish have no business doing mental nursing anyway. Frankly, you look to me to be more like a photographer's model than a nurse, but I suppose you never can tell . . . What course are you taking at the hospital?

JEAN:

The four months' course.

HANSON:

Oh, yes. Well, you general hospital nurses have an idea that you're superior to nurses who train in specialized hospitals like this. But you'll change your mind in the next four months.

JEAN:

Yes, Miss Hanson.

HANSON:

One word of caution. New nurses have a tendency to treat patients by themselves. Don't do it.

JEAN:

I'm here to learn, Miss Hanson, not to be a nuisance.

HANSON:

All right. You'd better take care of Mrs. Field now. You've got the key. Don't lose it. It's the one safeguard against the patient escaping. Fasten the end of the chain to your belt and don't under any circumstances let it get away from your charge. Under any circumstances.

MUSIC:

Up and down

SOUND:

Key in lock--door opens

JEAN:

Good morning, Mrs. Field. I've come to change the linen.

MRS. FIELD:

New girl . . . go away, go away. Get out of my room.

JEAN:

Now, Mrs. Field, you just stay there while I open this closet and get the linen out. Then, I'm afraid, I'll have to ask you to get out of bed.

FIELD:

You get out of my room! I know what you want to do . . . You want to poison me! You want to kill me . . . get out!

JEAN:

Now, Mrs. Field, I don't want to do anything of the sort. I'm here to help you. I wouldn't hurt you for the world.

FIELD:

You will, you will . . . you'll try to poison me. You're going to stab me . . I know what new girls are like . . . They all want to kill me . . . but I know . . . I'm careful of them . . . Now get out . . . get out!

JEAN:

I don't want to do anything like that at all. I'm a nurse, I'm here to see that you're comfortable and to help you.

FIELD:

No . . . no . . . they're all trying to kill me . . . they hate me.

JEAN:

Just lie still while I get the linen out of the closet.

SOUND:

Key in lock

JEAN:

I'll be ready for you in just a moment. You just stay quiet and . . . oh, dear, the key's stuck in the lock . . . now let me see.

SOUND:

Key rattle

JEAN:

I can't get it out . . . maybe if I . . .

FIELD:

Get out . . . get out or I'll throw you out.

JEAN:

Mrs. Field, if you'll just go back to bed and let me get this linen, you'll see that . . .

FIELD:

No! No! You leave my room! You get out of my room! Or I'll throw you out. I'll throw you out myself!

JEAN:

I'll do nothing of the . . .

SOUND:

Of blows

JEAN:

Groans

MUSIC:

Bridge

JEAN:

Groans

MISS BROWN:

Here, what's this? Let me help you up. What's happened? I'm
Miss Brown.

JEAN:

I . . . I . . . I went in to change the linen for Mrs. Field.

BROWN:

Mrs. Field. Why, they shouldn't have sent you in there, they know she doesn't like new girls. You are a new girl, aren't you? What happened?

JEAN:

She . . . she hit me and then I guess I landed in the corridor . . . I must have fainted . . . Oh, my head . . .

BROWN:

You'll be all right in a minute. You're lucky . . . if it had been Spencer now . . . She's a real terror. Boy! When she gets going . . .

JEAN:

Spencer?

BROWN:

In the room next to Field's. She's the violent case!

JEAN:

My key . . . where's my key . . . I had it right . . .

BROWN:

You haven't lost it, have you? We'll have to search right away . . . if Field got that key, I'd better go see if she's still in her room.

JEAN:

No, here it is . . . right on the floor. Oh thank goodness. It must have broken off the chain.

BROWN:

Oh, good. Well, get a new chain as soon as you can. That's a relief. We'd have had to search for Field for miles around if she ever got her hands on it.

JEAN:

Well, it's safe now. I'm glad she didn't run away. She might have murdered somebody if she did.

BROWN:

Yes . . . You feel all right?

JEAN:

Uhhh, all right now.

BROWN:

Good. I'd better get along then. You'll get used to this place, and you can thank your lucky star that it wasn't Spencer you met up with. Well, see you later.

JEAN:

Yes . . . and thank you. Thanks a lot . . . Hmm. Still feel a little dizzy. I guess I'd better get some water.

MISS SPENCER:

Hello.

JEAN:

Huh? Where? Who said that?

SPENCER:

Over here on this side. The room with the grill-work.

JEAN:

Oh.

SPENCER:

You were lying on the floor there a long time . . . That Mrs. Field, she gets awfully violent sometimes, doesn't she?

JEAN:

Yes, she does.

SPENCER:

Did she hurt you very much?

JEAN:

Hmmm? Oh . . . oh, no. I did faint for a minute, though, I guess. No, I'm all right. Nothing lost except perhaps my dignity. That got quite a jolt.

SPENCER:

I'm glad nothing worse was hurt. You'd better not go in there again. She's liable to do that to new nurses.

JEAN:

So I gathered from her conversation . . . and her actions. The thing that puzzles me is when do I become an "old nurse." I guess I'll just have to keep coming back, willy-nilly. I'll be more careful next time, though.

SPENCER:

Yes. You do have to be careful . . . especially with some of us.

JEAN:

Tell me, how is it that your door has only a grillwork? Most of these have glass on the door.

SPENCER:

I'm pretty quiet, you see. Not like some . . . I never make much noise . . . except to talk to the voices.

JEAN:

Voices . . . Oh, yes, of course.

SPENCER:

(laughs--mimics Jean) Oh, yes, of course. "Rule 34, always humor the patient."

JEAN:

(laughs) It did sound like that, didn't it? I'm sorry, but you know . . .

SPENCER:

Yes, I know . . . But I do hear them. What's your name?

JEAN:

I'm Miss Bradford.

SPENCER:

Well, Miss Bradford, what do you think of us anyway?

JEAN:

Think of . . . what do you mean?

SPENCER:

Why of us . . . of the patients here.

JEAN:

I don't know. I really don't. I've been here scarcely an hour as yet. But I think that as soon as I understand them a little better, I'm going to like it.

SPENCER:

I thought you might be that kind.

JEAN:

Is that a particular kind? You make me feel as though I were sort of special.

SPENCER:

It is, sort of . . . We don't get many like that here. Most of them are always trying to be bossy and order us around. It's just a job. They don't even try to understand us.

JEAN:

I see . . . like Miss Hanson, you mean?

SPENCER:

That's right. Like the head-nurse . . . you've met her already, have you?

JEAN:

Yes, naturally.

SPENCER:

(suddenly harsh) I hate her . . . I hate her . . . someday I'm going to kill her.

JEAN:

Now . . . now . . .

SPENCER:

I do . . . I do . . . I will.

JEAN:

I think . . . I think maybe you'd better get some rest now. Why don't you lie down for a few minutes? All this talking has tired you out. It's my fault, I'm sorry.

SPENCER:

No. I'm not tired. But it's nurses like that, that make me so . . . so angry . . . You can see what it means to have a nurse who will at least make an attempt to understand . . . It's . . . why, it's a great event.

JEAN:

Yes, I see.

SPENCER:

Would you come and talk to me sometimes? I would like so much . . . (Off mike) You! You! Leave Leonard alone! Do you hear me? Leave Leonard alone!

MUSIC:

up and down

JEAN:

Miss Hanson, who is the patient in the room across from Mrs. Fields?

HANSON:

Which patient?

JEAN:

Why, she's about twenty-three--a little taller than I am and slender. She's got a lovely, intelligent face.

HANSON:

Oh! That's Anita Spencer. You'll get over thinking she's lovely after she's tried to kill you once or twice.

JEAN:

Oh, so she's Spencer. The one Brown calls the terror. I looked into her room. It's awfully bare. Nothing in it but the bed and the blankets. Mrs. Field's room has more in it than that.

HANSON:

Yes. She can't have more than that. She'd destroy anything else in a second . . . That's why she has a grill instead of glass on the door, too. Heaven knows what would happen to a glass door, if she had one.

JEAN:

But she's got blankets.

HANSON:

Those blankets are indestructible.

JEAN:

Thank you . . . Miss Hanson, who is Leonard?

HANSON:

Leonard? Leonard? Oh! He's the man she's engaged to marry. But you needn't think romance blighted Anita's young life . . . Too much study did that for her.

JEAN:

Too much study? That seems harmless enough. She should be easily cured if that's all that's wrong with her.

HANSON:

Think so? I'd like to see you do it.

JEAN:

I wish I could, I wish I could.

MUSIC:

Bridge

JEAN:

Hello, Miss Spencer, I came down to say goodnight.

SPENCER:

You are so kind to me. Why?

JEAN:

I like you. If I'd known you outside I'm sure we would have been friends. I'd like to be friends now, if you care to.

SPENCER:

Friends? You want to be friends with me, now?

JEAN:

Of course. Why not? You're still you, no matter how sick you are.

SPENCER:

Yes. I suppose so. But then, when the voices . . .

JEAN:

Do they come often? Do they bother you much?

SPENCER:

No. Not often. But when they do, it's like . . . it's like I'm outside of myself watching. And they tell me to do things, terrible things, and I do them.

JEAN:

Haven't you ever tried to control yourself? To stop yourself from doing them?

SPENCER:

Yes . . . I try, sometimes. But I never can . . . I never can.

JEAN:

Well, maybe sometime you will be able to.

SPENCER:

I hope so. I don't want to stay here forever.

JEAN:

I shouldn't think you would.

SPENCER:

I'd like to go out some day. To go out and see the trees and the fields . . . and to go home again. That would be nice. I'd like to go home again.

JEAN:

You will, I'm sure . . . some day.

SPENCER:

But I mustn't keep you here all this time. You're tired, too.

JEAN:

No. I don't mind . . . I like talking to you. Sometime you must tell me about your home . . . what it was like, and about your family. I'd like to hear it.

SPENCER:

I . . . Did you know that you stopped the voices then? They hushed, all at once. They were talking to me, and then . . . they stopped, all of a sudden. That's strange. It's never happened to me before. Never.

JEAN:

I'm glad it did happen. Very glad. Maybe between us, we'll be able to stop the voices altogether. If you try hard, that is.

SPENCER:

I'll try, of course. But it's very hard.

JEAN:

Naturally it'll be hard, but don't you think it would be worth it?

SPENCER:

Oh, yes!

JEAN:

Well, then, we'll both do our best. I promise you I'll do all I can to help you.

SPENCER:

Oh, that's wonderful! You're wonderful, Miss Bradford. Nobody's ever tried really to help me like that before. I'm so glad you're here now, in this hospital.

JEAN:

Yes, that's fine . .. now, why don't you try to get some rest? Hmm? Try it.

SPENCER:

Are you going now? Are you going to leave me now?

JEAN:

Do you want me to stay for a while longer?

SPENCER:

I'd like . . . would you do something for me?

JEAN:

Certainly.

SPENCER:

When I was a little girl, my mother used to put me to sleep by saying a little poem from Stevenson's Child's Garden of Verses. I keep trying to remember it, but I can't somehow. In the night, it almost comes back, but not quite. Do you know it; could you remember it? It begins like this: "Up into the cherry tree" and that's all I can remember.

JEAN:

Yes, I know it.

Up into the Cherry Tree
Who should climb but little me,
I held the trunk with both my hands
And looked abroad on foreign lands.

SPENCER:

That's it! That's it!

JEAN:

Why don't you try to memorize it now? I know! You repeat it after me as I say it . . . Up into the cherry tree . . .

SPENCER:

Up into the cherry tree . . .

JEAN:

Who should climb but little me . . .

SPENCER:

(Fade out)

MUSIC:

Start fade in

SPENCER:

Who should climb but little me . . .

MUSIC:

Up and down

BROWN:

Come on, Bradford. You're in for it this morning. Spencer's hair has to be combed and you'll have to help me. We're a nurse short. Now you'll see your little protege really act up.

JEAN:

What's the idea, Brownie?

BROWN:

Why, Spencer thinks that every time we comb her hair we cut chunks out of it, and she fights like blazes. Look. See the scar on my thumb here? That's where she bit me last time.

JEAN:

Gosh! I didn't think she . . . Well, you can't call this a dull life, can you?

BROWN:

I'll say you can't. Now listen to me. You must remember what I say or you'll get in trouble. Never let a patient get hurt, or bumped, or bruised in any way. When she jumps at us, and she certainly will . . . try to get hold of an arm or a leg and never let go, no matter what the patient does to you. If you do, some of us will be killed, understand?

JEAN:

But couldn't we hold a towel over her mouth so she can't bite like that?

BROWN:

Good Lord, no! That's cruelty to the patient. If you get bitten, you get bitten, that's all. Well, here we are.

JEAN:

Two nurses for one poor girl, my goodness!

BROWN:

Yes, but what a little girl!

SOUND:

Knock on door

BROWN:

Good morning, Miss Spencer.

SPENCER:

(sullen) Good morning, Miss Brown.

BROWN:

Miss Spencer . . . I . . . we . . . I think you'd better have your hair combed this morning. It's getting all snarled again. Please!

SPENCER:

No . . . go away from that door.

BROWN:

Miss Spencer, won't you please come out quietly? You know how you hate being fastened in the chair, and we hate doing it, too. Please!

SPENCER:

No!

BROWN:

It's no use, Jean . . . Come on! I'll stand in front, you stand behind me. Close behind me. And get set for that first rush. When she comes at me, grab her.

SOUND:

Key in door--door open--scream--body falling on floor--heavy breathing for few seconds

BROWN:

Let me hold that leg, Bradford, I'm stronger than you. Get the mattress quick. Drag it behind them and put it under her!

SOUND:

Heavy breathing stops

BROWN:

There! (Sigh)

SPENCER:

You . . . you . . . get out . . . get out and leave me alone. I won't have my hair cut out . . . I won't . . . I won't.

BROWN:

Now, Miss Spencer, you know it's not going to hurt you. We're only going to comb it.

SPENCER:

You will. You will. I hate you . . . all of you . . . I . . .

JEAN:

Here, Miss Spencer, let me put your head on my lap a minute, maybe you'll feel better.

SPENCER:

Thank you, Miss Bradford. Thank you.

BROWN:

Miss Spencer?

HANSON:

Oh, there you are, Miss Spencer. Everything all right, Miss Brown?
JEAN: Yes, Miss Hanson. It's all right now.

HANSON:

Fine. There's something I want to get here. Keep away from the closet, please.

SPENCER:

Don't touch those letters, Hanson! You sneak! Put those letters back. Put Leonard's letters back! Thief! Murderess! Put them back!

HANSON:

Be quiet, Miss Spencer. These letters excite you too much. You can have them back when you're better.

SPENCER:

(Starts a low moan that gets higher and higher in pitch)

HANSON:

You needn't start one of your tantrums again. It won't help you.

SPENCER:

Put them back! Thief, robber! Murderess! Put back my letters. They're from Leonard. They're mine!

MUSIC:

Bridge

SOUND:

Knock on door

JEAN:

Miss Spencer . . . I got your letters back for you. I took them from Miss Hanson. I've got them. I've got the letters.

SPENCER:

Oh, my letters, thank you! Thank you!

JEAN:

No one must know I took them. If it's discovered, I'll be expelled and the letters'll be taken away from you again. Miss Hanson really believes they do you harm, you see, and she honestly wants you to get well. They must be hidden somewhere. Now, will you promise never to tell?

SPENCER:

Yes, I promise.

JEAN:

Good. Now, the trouble is, there's no place in your room where they can be hidden, except in your closet, and that's locked to you. Have you a suitcase here?

SPENCER:

Yes. Yes. I have.

JEAN:

Good. I'll put them there, if you're willing. You won't be able to get at them, of course, but they'll be in your room. They'll be yours again. And as soon as you get better, your closet door will be left unlocked again. All right?

SPENCER:

Yes. Can I have them now?

JEAN:

Here they are. You read them, then we'll consider the closet. I'll wait. Just a second, I'll open the door.

SOUND:

Key in lock--door opens and closes--key in lock again

SPENCER:

Why did you lock the door? Don't you trust me?

JEAN:

Why . . . my dear, think what would happen if the night nurse came down and found me talking to you with the door unlocked.

SPENCER:

Yes . . . yes, that's true. I'd lose you then, wouldn't I? I'm glad you thought of that.

JEAN:

All right, now?

SPENCER:

All right.

JEAN:

You know, don't you, that I'm absolutely alone down here? And no one could possibly hear if I called. The night nurse is in the upper hall now.

SPENCER:

Yes. I know. Please don't be afraid. I won't touch you.

JEAN:

I'm not afraid. I'm just telling you the situation.

SPENCER:

Would you . . . would you like to read my letters? They're from Leonard.

JEAN:

No . . . No, Miss Spencer. They're your letters. They're not my business.

SPENCER:

But I wouldn't mind. I wouldn't mind at all. Aren't we friends?

JEAN:

Yes. Yes, we are. Perhaps I'll read them some other time, dear. Sometime when we can both have lots of leisure and we'll read them together . . . Now, I'll put them away.

SOUND:

Key in lock--door opens

SPENCER:

The suitcase is in the back. In the corner.

SOUND:

Dragging suitcase

JEAN:

I've got it . . . Oh, you startled me, coming up behind me like that. I thought you were over in the corner. Is there a pocket anywhere in this that will be safe?

SPENCER:

(voice low and slightly thick) Yes, right there on the left.

SOUND:

Suitcase lock--snap

JEAN:

There! It's done.

SOUND:

Suitcase dragged again--door lock

JEAN:

No one will ever find it there.

SPENCER:

(thick voice) Miss Bradford. Please, hurry, get out the door! Please! Hurry! Hurry!

JEAN:

All right.

SPENCER:

Please! Please! (This rises into a scream)

SOUND:

Door closed and locked

JEAN:

(through scream) Good night, Miss Spencer.

MUSIC:

Up and down

SOUND:

Knock on door

GRESHAM:

Come in.

SOUND:

Door opens and shuts

GRESHAM:

Oh, it's you, Miss Bradford. Come in. Sit down.

JEAN:

Dr. Gresham, could I speak to you for a minute?

GRESHAM:

Why, certainly. What's troubling you?

JEAN:

Well, nothing's the trouble exactly. It's just . . . well, I wanted to ask your advice. It's about one of the patients in the sanitarium. I'd like to know what you think about the case.

GRESHAM:

Suppose you tell me about it.

JEAN:

Her name's Spencer, Anita Spencer.

GRESHAM:

Oh, yes. I've heard something about her from Mrs. Hanson. It's really very sad.

JEAN:

Then you do know something about her. Well, the thing I've come to ask, is this. Has she any chance of getting well?

GRESHAM:

The doctors couldn't say whether she'd recover or not.

JEAN:

That's not much help, is it? Had they any suggestions? Any at all?

GRESHAM:

In their report they stated that if she were to show any definite signs of self-control, she might be said to have a chance for recovery. But as things were . . .

JEAN:

I see. Signs of self-control. In other words, if she were to overcome one of her spells. Is that it?

GRESHAM:

That's it . . . or if she were, for instance, in a position to act up and didn't.

JEAN:

And is there anything I can do to help her?

GRESHAM:

Nothing. Nothing except to watch her and to make the most of any opportunity that offers . . . if there are any.

JEAN:

I see. But if she does show that self-control at any time?

GRESHAM:

Then she would be well on her way to recovery and sanity again.

MUSIC:

Bridge

HANSON:

Miss Bradford, you'll have to help me get the patients up from the baths. All the other nurses are in class except Miss Brown, and she's not feeling well. We're the only two out.

JEAN:

Just the two of us, Miss Hanson?

HANSON:

That's right. And heaven knows what that Spencer girl is liable to do at a time like this. She hates getting into the baths, but she hates coming out just as much, if not more.

JEAN:

But Mrs. Field is there, too, now. Isn't she just as bad as Miss Spencer?

HANSON:

Yes, she is. But unfortunately Mrs. Field is afraid of me. And Miss Spencer . . .

JEAN:

Miss Spencer hates you.

HANSON:

Precisely. Come on.

JEAN:

Yes, Miss Hanson.

HANSON:

I never could understand that . . . why she hated me. So much more than any of the other nurses, I mean. With most of them, you know, it's just an impersonal hatred of all of us. Miss Spencer's is completely personal.

JEAN:

Yes, here it is. Just a moment, I'll open the door.

SOUND:

Key in lock--door opens . . .

JEAN:

No wonder these baths quiet the patients. I'd almost like to play in them myself.

HANSON:

Don't talk foolishly, Miss Bradford.

JEAN:

Sorry.

HANSON:

Mrs. Field! Come on, Mrs. Field, you'll have to get out of there. It's supper time. Don't keep me waiting, Mrs. Field. Hurry or you'll miss supper entirely!

FIELD:

No . . . not coming.

HANSON:

Will you come out or do I have to come over there and drag you out? Very well . . . I'm coming over there myself . . . now will you . . . oh!

FIELD:

[(starts screaming)]

JEAN:

Mrs. Field, don't do that. Look out, Miss Hanson.

SOUND:

Body stumbling

JEAN:

(yells) Miss Spencer, be quiet!

SOUND:

Scream stops--body falling--dull crack

HANSON:

Oh, my hip! My hip!

JEAN:

I've got her, Miss Hanson. Just as soon as I tie her with this apron.

FIELD:

No! You . . .

JEAN:

Quick, Miss Hanson! Help me! Miss Hanson, you'll have to help me! This apron, it won't hold! Come on!

HANSON:

I can't! I can't! She's broken my hip! We'll be killed! We'll both be killed! . . . Look out! Spencer's behind you! Look out!

JEAN:

(shaky) Miss Spencer . . . Miss Spencer?

SPENCER:

Yes, Miss Bradford?

JEAN:

Miss Spencer, will you help me?

SPENCER:

Yes. What do you want me to do?

JEAN:

Here, take my key. Get some sheets and a blanket from the linen closet. Quick!

SPENCER:

Yes, Miss Bradford.

HANSON:

You fool! What have you done? She'll never come back. She'll never come back! This is the chance she's been waiting for.

JEAN:

No, Miss Hanson. This is the chance I've been waiting for.

MUSIC:

Bridge

JEAN:

Where is she? I can't . . . I can't hold Mrs. Field much longer . . .

HANSON:

I told you! I told you! You'll be fired for this! You'll never get another job in a hospital. Of course she'll run away. She'll escape now that she has the chance . . .

JEAN:

She's going to come back, I know she will.

HANSON:

By this time she's probably out of the place altogether. And you're responsible . . . you . . . with your stupid soft-heartedness. You're responsible for loosening a murderess on the community.

JEAN:

She's not a murderess, Miss Hanson. You've treated her like an animal, but if you'd treated her like a human being instead, she would have been out of here long ago.

HANSON:

The way she's gone out now, I suppose.

JEAN:

She hasn't gone out, now. She'll come back. But she will be free soon. She needed this one opportunity to prove it. I've asked the doctor about her--if she lives up to it, she'll be a free woman in a short while.

HANSON:

She's gone . . . she's gone . . . she's run away . . . and you did it.

SOUND:

Door opens and closes

SPENCER:

Here are the sheets, Miss Bradford.

JEAN:

Oh, Miss Spencer!

SPENCER:

I'm sorry I took so long, but I couldn't find the linen closet at first. I've never been out before, you know.

JEAN:

That's all right, Miss Spencer.

SPENCER:

You'd better let me hold Mrs. Field. I'm stronger than you.

JEAN:

Yes . . . all right, her legs are tied. Now . . . hold the arms . . . there! All right! Will you help me get Miss Hanson into a more comfortable position now, please?

SPENCER:

Miss Hanson? Of course.

HANSON:

I . . . I never . . . I can't understand . . .

JEAN:

There! That's fine . . . all right, Miss Spencer, and thank you very much . . . I think you'd better go back to your room now.

SPENCER:

Yes, Miss Bradford . . . Oh! Here's your pass-key, Miss Bradford. I think you forgot it. And you wouldn't be able to get out of the building without it, would you?

MUSIC:

Up and out