Generic Radio Workshop Script Library (BACK)

Series: The Screen Guild Theater
Show: The Valiant
Date: May 17 1948

CAST:
ROY, announcer
CHANDLER, announcer
NARRATOR (2 lines)
CHAPLAIN
WARDEN
DAN, the jailer (2 lines)
JAMES DYKE, the murderer
WILSON, the attendant (2 lines)
GIRL

ROY:

(COLD) From Hollywood, Camel Cigarettes present "The Screen Guild Players."

MUSIC:

SYMPHONIC CAMEL THEME...FULL...AND FADE TO CONTINUE UNDER..

ROY:

Our stars -- Gregory Peck, Jeanne Crain and Edward Arnold.
Our play -- "The Valiant."
Our host - Camel Cigarettes. (MUSIC: OUT)

CHANDLER:

Experience is the Best Teacher!

ROY:

Try a Camel --- let your own experience tell you why more people are smoking Camels than ever before! Yes, try a Camel in your "T-Zone"...T for Taste and T for Throat...where you judge any cigarette. See what rich, full flavor...what new enjoyment...Camel brings to your taste. See what your throat reports on Camel's cool, cool mildness.

MUSIC:

(SHORT THEME)

ROY:

Tonight Camel Cigarettes present the Screen Guild Players in one of the most gripping dramas the American Theatre has ever known with a brilliant cast to enact it for you. "The Valiant" --- based on the original play by Robert Middlemass -- starring Gregory Peck as the Prisoner; Jeanne Crain as the girl; Edward Arnold as the Warden; and Pedro de Cordoba as the Chaplain.

The Camel Screen Guild players in "The Valiant."

MUSIC:

(FULL INTO.......PLAY THEME...AND FADE TO CONTINUE UNDER:)

NARR:

A penitentiary. The Connecticut State Prison.... A bad night. A depressing night. A night set aside for an execution.

MUSIC:

(PUNCTUATES...AND CONTINUES UNDER:)

SOUND:

(HEAVY, STEADY RAIN)

NARR:

It's raining outside. A steady dismal rain that chills the bones and drums its way into the mind. A relentless, implacable sort of rain. Even conversation becomes damp and heavy...Inside, in the prison office, a single small lamp is burning on the warden's desk. And here, in the half-lit, half-shadowed gloom, two men wait and count the passing minutes. The Warden and the Prison Chaplain -- both trying to forget what lies ahead.....

MUSIC:

(FADES OUT INTO:)

SOUND:

(RAIN HOLDS BRIEFLY...IN CLEAR)

CHAPLAIN:

(SIGHS) Still raining, Warden...

WARDEN:

Yeah.... (GROWLS) It would have to go and rain tonight...

CHAPLAIN: (SOFTLY) It's past eleven. We haven't very much longer to wait.

WARDEN:

(VEHEMENT) No, thank God, we....(PENITENT) Sorry Father....I guess I'm getting too old for this sort of thing.

CHAPLAIN:

(GENTLY) Is anyone ever young enough?

WARDEN:

No, I suppose not...(ANGRY) But a necktie party didn't use to bother me so much. This one's giving me the blue devils.

CHAPLAIN:

It's not a pleasant duty. Even with the worst of them.

WARDEN:

(HEAVILY) No......(A PAUSE) Was he quiet when you left him?

CHAPLAIN:

Yes, he was perfectly calm. I believe he'll stay that way to the end.

WARDEN:

[You've got to hand it to him, Father. I never saw such nerve in all my life....It isn't a bluff. And it isn't a trance, either, like some of 'em have. It's sheer nerve. Yes, sir you've certainly got to hand it to him.

CHAPLAIN:

That's the pity of it. That a man with all his courage hasn't made a better use of it.]

WARDEN:

(OBLIQUE) Tell me -- when you were with him, in his cell -- did he talk?

CHAPLAIN:

Oh, yes. He talked very freely.

WARDEN:

(GROWING INTEREST) What about?

CHAPLAIN:

(FAINT SMILE) Almost everything.

WARDEN:

(QUICKLY) Himself?

CHAPLAIN:

Almost everything except himself. That still seems to be the one thing he won't talk about.

WARDEN:

(IRRITABLE) That's what's got my goat. He's been like that ever since he came in...Four months. Watching tonight come closer and closer....and still refusing to tell us who he really is.

CHAPLAIN:

(SOBERLY) I'm afraid he intends to go on that way -- trying to make us believe his name is James Dyke.

WARDEN:

James Dyke! That isn't his name any more than it's mine! He's just trying to shield somebody, that's all! He's trying to keep his family and friends from knowing what's happened to him.

CHAPLAIN:

That takes moral courage. His family and friends might have comforted him.

WARDEN:

What time is it, Father?

CHAPLAIN:

Eleven-thirty.....(A PAUSE, THEN UNDERSTANDINGLY) Warden, if you want to pour yourself a drink....

WARDEN:

Thanks, Father, I think I will....(BOTTLE ON GLASS) I don't know why I should hate this one any more than the others. The boy is guilty as the devil.

CHAPLAIN:

(GENTLY) Yes.....He killed a man.. Wilfully, feloniously, and with malice aforethought.

WARDEN:

And he pleaded guilty, so he deserves just what he's going to get....

CHAPLAIN:

(GRAVELY) That is the law.

WARDEN:

(FLARING) Still, if he'd only talk. If he'd just open up --

CHAPLAIN:

[(QUIETLY) If he would only pray.....

WARDEN:

Not him. Some of the others get courage from prayer. He seems to to get it from something else. (FLARES) From what? Who is he? I've tried every way I know to find out.

CHAPLAIN:

So have I --]

WARDEN:

I've begged, I've argued, I've threatened, I've coaxed -- (GRIM) and I'm not through yet!

CHAPLAIN:

What do you mean?

WARDEN:

(GRUMBLES) First time I've done a thing like this in the twenty-eight years I've been Warden here. I'm going to try and talk to him again.

MUSIC:

(FOR BRIDGE...AND FADE OUT INTO)

SOUND:

(DOOR OPENS, OFF)

DAN:

(SLIGHTLY OFF, QUIETLY) Here he is, Warden, I brought him up.

WARDEN:

Okay, Dan. You can wait outside.

DAN:

(SLIGHTLY OFF) Yes, sir. (DOOR CLOSES....OFF)

WARDEN:

Come in, Dyke. Sit down.

DYKE:

(COMING IN) Thanks.

WARDEN:

Dyke, you've been here under my charge for four months now, and I want to tell you that from first to last you've behaved yourself like a gentleman.

DYKE:

(VAGUELY CYNICAL) Why should I make any trouble?

WARDEN:

Well, you haven't made any trouble - and I've tried to show you what I think about it. I've made you as comfortable as the law would let me.

DYKE:

You've been very kind, Warden...You, too, Father.

WARDEN:

I've had you brought in here to stay -- from now on. With the Chaplain and me.

DYKE:

(INDIFFERENT) That's fine.

WARDEN:

(A LITTLE PIQUED) This is a very unusual procedure. You don't seem to understand.

DYKE:

Sure I do, Warden. But you don't seem to understand -- it doesn't give me much of a thrill.

CHAPLAIN:

My son, the Warden is only trying to do you one more kindness.

DYKE:

I know he is, but what's the use? From now on, one place is about the same as another to me.

CHAPLAIN:

But, my son --

DYKE:

Look, I'm just as much a condemned prisoner here as I was in my cell...(CYNICAL) Armed guards out there in the rain....every few feet...Dan planted outside that door...And that other door -- I know as well as you do where that door leads to.

WARDEN:

[(STIFFLY) Would you rather wait in your cell?

DYKE:

Oh, no, this is a little pleasanter. Except --

CHAPLAIN:

Except what, my son?

DYKE:

Well - in my cell I could smoke.

WARDEN:

Oh...What do you want, a cigarette?

DYKE:

If you don't mind.

WARDEN:

There's a box on my desk. Help yourself.

DYKE:

Thanks....(LID OF CIGARETTE BOX DROPS)

WARDEN:

(GRUFFLY) Light? (MATCH STRIKES)

DYKE:

Much obliged....(PUFFS ON CIGARETTE) You know, Warden, you're a pretty good host.]

WARDEN:

(QUIETLY) Dyke, before it's too late, I wish you'd think over what the Chaplain and I have said to you so many times.

DYKE:

(QUIETLY) I have thought it over.

WARDEN:

Then, as man to man -- and this is your last chance -- who are you?

DYKE:

(THOUGHTFUL) Who am I?....James Dyke....a murderer.

WARDEN:

That's not your real name!

DYKE:

So what? You're not going to execute a name -- you're going to execute a man. What difference does it make if you call me Dyke or something else?

CHAPLAIN:

It makes a great deal of difference, my son.

WARDEN:

To a lot of people..You see that pile of letters on my desk? They're just a few samples. Altogether I've got four thousand letters like those.

DYKE:

That's a lot of letters.

WARDEN:

From every State in the Union -- from Canada -- from England -- all asking the same thing. Who are you? And are you the missing son -- or brother -- or husband -- or sweetheart?

DYKE:

Have you answered them?

WARDEN:

I couldn't. You're the only one can do that.

DYKE:

(SARDONIC) In twenty minutes?....Listen, Warden, you can write these people and tell them I'm not the man they're looking for. And that'll be the truth, too. Because I haven't any mother -- or father -- or sister -- or wife -- or sweetheart. I haven't anyone, see?

WARDEN:

(DIRECT) You're trying to shield somebody, aren't you?

DYKE:

Maybe I am, and maybe I'm not.

WARDEN:

(INSISTENT) Who is it? Your family?

DYKE:

I didn't say I was.

WARDEN:

You didn't say you weren't.....(PERSUASIVE) Dyke, just listen to me a moment. Don't be narrow about this thing. Try to look at it in a big, broad way. You want to spare your family, and I don't blame you. But why don't you figure it from this other angle? Suppose you came out with the truth? You might put all this sorrow into one home -- one family -- your own. But you'd be bringing a tremendous relief to four thousand others. Don't you think you owe something to all these other people?

DYKE:

Not a thing.

CHAPLAIN:

But, my boy, you do owe something to all those others. The Warden is right. You owe them peace of mind.....(PLEADS) For the sake of all those distressed souls who imagine God knows what, I beg you to tell us who you are.

WARDEN:

(A PAUSE...SIGHS) I guess it's no use, Father... Dyke, is there any other statement you want to make?

DYKE:

No, I think I've said everything. I killed a man and I'm not sorry for it. I mean I'm not sorry I killed that particular person. I--

CHAPLAIN: (SHOCKED) My son -- repentance --

DYKE:

Sure, Father, I know. I've heard repentance is the sick-bed of the soul -- and mine is pretty healthy right now....The man deserved to be killed. He wasn't fit to live. I knew I had to kill him and I did it. I did it deliberately and intentionally and carefully. I knew what I was doing and I've got no excuse -- at least, no excuse that'll satisfy the law.

WARDEN:

Look, Dyke --

DYKE:

That's all there is to that. And an hour from now, if a couple of angel policemen grab my soul and haul it up before God --

CHAPLAIN:

(DEEPLY SHOCKED) My boy, my boy -- please --

DYKE:

I'm sorry, Father. I didn't mean to step on anything that's sacred to you...But if I've got to be judged by God Almighty for the crime of murder, I'm not afraid. Because the other fellow will be there too, won't he? And when God hears the whole story -- and both sides of it -- which you never heard -- and they never heard it in the courtroom, either -- well, then, if He's any kind of a God at all, I'm willing to take my chances with the other fellow...That's all.

WARDEN:

Well, Dyke, if you feel that way....(PHONE RINGS)

DYKE:

(SARDONIC) Better grab that, Warden. It might be a reprieve....(RECEIVER UP)....I don't think.

WARDEN:

(TO PHONE) Hello?....Yes, this is the Warden...Who?....(SUDDENLY MORE TENSE) Where? Downstairs?...No....No, don't do that. I'll come down. (RECEIVER DOWN) (AGITATED) I'm sorry, gentlemen. I'll have to leave for a moment.

DYKE:

(SMILING, DRILY) I guess it wasn't the Governor.

WARDEN:

(QUIETLY) No, it wasn't the Governor....It's someone else....

MUSIC:

(SHARP CHORD...AND FADE OUT INTO)

WARDEN:

(LOW) Where is she, Wilson?

WILSON:

(LOW) In there, in the waiting room....I figured she must be pretty important. The Governor sent her over in his own car.

WARDEN:

And she thinks this fellow Dyke is her brother?

WILSON:

She doesn't think_ - she's sure he is...I had the Matron frisk her, just to be safe.

WARDEN:

Okay. (STEPS....DOOR OPENS) You want to see me, Miss?

GIRL:

(SLIGHTLY OFF, TIMID) Are - are you the Warden?

WARDEN:

Yes - I am. (DOOR CLOSES) No, don't get up. Just sit where you are, please.

GIRL:

(COMING IN) Thank you....

WARDEN:

(GRAVE) Now then....I understand the Governor sent you over. You wish to see Dyke?

GIRL:

Yes sir, I hope I'm not -- too late.

WARDEN:

No, you're not too late. But I want to ask you a few questions first.

GIRL:

(ALARMED) Questions?

WARDEN:

(QUICKLY) Nothing to get upset about. I just want to make it easier for you..Where do you live?

GIRL:

In Pennington, sir. In Ohio. It's a little town not far from Columbus.

WARDEN:

And you live out there with your mother and father?

GIRL:

No, sir - just my mother and I. My father died when I was a little girl.

WARDEN:

Any brothers or sisters?

GIRL:

Just one brother, sir. This one. That's why I came.

WARDEN:

(KINDLY) Of course.. And what makes you so sure that this man Dyke is your brother?

GIRL:

His picture - in the paper. The minute Mother saw it she said it was Joe....That's my brother's name, Joe....

WARDEN:

I see....Too bad you couldn't have gotten here sooner. The case has been in the papers for six months now.

GIRL:

It was only last Tuesday that Mother saw it in the Journal -- that's our paper at home -- and -- well, she just wanted me to come East and find out for sure.

WARDEN:

Why didn't your mother come herself?

GIRL:

She's very sick. She's been sick almost ever since Joe ran away.

WARDEN:

How long ago was that?

GIRL:

Eight years.

WARDEN:

You must have been very young.

GIRL:

Oh, I was almost ten.

WARDEN:

(SOBERLY) Still, you haven't seen him in eight years. What makes you think you'd recognize your brother now?

GIRL:

Well - of course - I -- I think --

WARDEN:

But how could you be sure? Suppose he doesn't want to be recognized?

GIRL:

(BRIGHTENING) Oh, I've thought of that. I'll just ask him questions -- about things we used to do together -- and I'll watch his face. If he's my brother, I'm sure I can tell.

WARDEN:

I wouldn't bank on that.

GIRL:

But you see, he used to play games with me when I was a little girl. He used to read so much -- he was reading stories all the time -- and then he'd tell the stories to me. That's what I'm counting on most -- the stories. Especially the Shakespeare stories.

WARDEN:

Shakespeare!

GIRL:

(RUSHING ON) Yes, and one in particular. Every night he'd sit beside my bed, and when I got sleepy, there were two speeches from Romeo and Juliet -- you know, Shakespeare's play -- and we'd always say them to each other for goodnight...I'd say: 'Good night, good night, parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow'. And then Joe would always answer: 'Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast; Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest'...(PLEADINGLY) He couldn't forget that! I'll say my lines to him and -- (STOPS SHORT) Why are you shaking your head like that?

WARDEN:

This boy isn't your brother.

GIRL:

You think he isn't?

WARDEN:

I know he isn't. This boy never heard of Shakespeare, much less learned him...But still, since you've come all this way --

GIRL:

(EAGER) You'll let me see him anyway? I can talk to him?

WARDEN:

The question is, will he talk to you...

MUSIC:

(SHARP CHORD...FADE OUT INTO)

WARDEN:

I think you might at least give her a break, Dyke. She's come a thousand miles to see you.

DYKE:

(SARDONIC) That's a good one, Warden.... Father, don't you think that's funny...A year ago nobody'd cross the street to look at me. And now they come a thousand miles.

CHAPLAIN:

(QUIETLY) She must be very certain that she's your sister.

DYKE:

(SNAPS) Well, she's wrong! I haven't any sister!

WARDEN:

(QUIETLY) Shall I tell her that, or do you want to tell her yourself?

DYKE:

(INDIFFERENT) You can tell her.

WARDEN:

Too bad. I thought when she went back to Pennington she'd --

DYKE:

(OFF GUARD, ALMOST SHARPLY) Pennington?

WARDEN:

Yeah. Pennington, Ohio. You ever been there?

DYKE:

(RECOVERED) Never heard of the joint. (A PAUSE, GRUFFLY) Still..if she's come all the way from Ohio...

CHAPLAIN:

(QUICKLY) My boy, this is one of your debts to humanity. It wouldn't take you two minutes to see her.

DYKE:

(SLOWLY) Where would I talk to her -- here?

WARDEN:

Of course.

DYKE:

Alone?...

WARDEN:

(HESITANT) Well....

DYKE:

Don't be afraid. I wouldn't cheat the sovereign State of Connecticut for anything in the world.

WARDEN:

(SMILING) You know, Dyke, there's something about you that wins everybody.

DYKE:

(DRILY) Yeah, especially that jury that put me here.... (GRUFF) Go ahead, Warden.. Bring her in.

(MUSIC: IN FULL, FOR CURTAIN)

(APPLAUSE)

(BREAK FOR COMMERCIAL)

ROY:

In just a moment Edward Arnold, Jeanne Crain and Gregory Peck will return to the Camel Screen Guild microphone in Act II of "The Valiant.." ....

Sometimes there is a play so fine, so moving, so vivid that its lustre never dims. Such a play is "The Valiant," justly famous ever since it was written twenty-nine years ago. (REMINISCENTLY) Twenty-nine years ago! Nineteen nineteen - when folks were taking up the automobile in a big way..but an airplane in the sky was still the signal for craned necks. And when a cigarette called Camel was achieving a popularity never dreamed of until then. Yes, and during the years Camel has kept that popularity ..has increased it by leaps and bounds.

CHANDLER:

More people are smoking Camels than ever before.

ROY:

More people are smoking Camels because millions of smokers have tried and compared the different brands of cigarettes. Yes, compared them for flavor, for mildness, and for all-round smoking pleasure. And this experience convinced them that Camel's rich, full flavor, and cool, cool, mildness suit them best. Experience is the best teacher. Try a Camel. Let your own experience tell you why more people are smoking Camels than ever before. And remember... Camels by the carton are the best buy!

MUSIC:

(SHOW THEME)

ROY:

Camel cigarettes now present Act II of "The Valiant" starring Jeanne Crain, Gregory Peck and Edward Arnold.

MUSIC:

(........FULL INTO PLAY THEME..AND DOWN....TO HOLD UNDER)

SOUND:

(HEAVY, STEADY RAIN)

NARR:

Outside, the same dreary dismal rain.... In the prison office, the same gloomy light...And now the door opens -- (DOOR OPENS) And Dyke and the Chaplain turn together, as the Warden enters with the girl..... (MUSIC: OUT)

WARDEN:

In here, Miss. This is my office.

GIRL:

(TIMIDLY) Thank you.

WARDEN:

Dyke, this is the young lady that's come all the way from Ohio to see you.

DYKE:

Yes sir.

WARDEN:

I've decided you can talk with her in here -- alone.

DYKE:

Thanks. It won't take long.

WARDEN:

The Chaplain and I will wait outside the door. You'll be on your honor.

DYKE:

(CYNICAL ASIDE) That's a hot one, my honor!

WARDEN:

How's that?

DYKE:

Nothing. Forget it.

WARDEN:

All right, Miss -- you'll remember what I said about the time?

GIRL:

Yes, sir. I know. Five minutes.

WARDEN:

I'm afraid that's just about all that's left. (FADING) Come along, Father.

CHAPLAIN:

Yes, I'm coming. (FADING) Good luck, Miss. (DOOR CLOSES, OFF)

GIRL:

(A PAUSE..THEN, WITH DIFFICULTY) I - I - uh -- Mother sent me to see you.

DYKE:

(POLITE INDIFFERENCE) Did she?

GIRL:

Yes, you see, we haven't heard from Joe..that's my brother....in ever so long. And Mother thought that....that....

DYKE:

That I might be your brother Joe?

GIRL:

(RELIEVED) Yes, that's it.

DYKE:

Well, you can easily see that I'm not, can't you?

GIRL:

(STUDYING HIM) I'm not sure....You look a little like him...so did the picture in the paper..but then again, it's been so long.

DYKE:

(AS TO A CHILD) As a matter of fact, I couldn't be your brother or anybody's brother, because I've never had a sister.

GIRL:

(SEARCHING) Honestly?

DYKE:

Honestly.

GIRL:

(UNCONVINCED) What's your real name?

DYKE:

Dyke. James Dyke.

GIRL:

That's sure enough your name?

DYKE:

Sure enough. You don't think I'd lie at this stage of the game?

GIRL:

No, I don't guess you would...(SUDDENLY) Where do you come from? I mean, where were you born?

DYKE:

In Canada. But I've lived about everywhere.

GIRL:

Didn't you ever live in Ohio?

DYKE:

No. Never.

GIRL:

What kind of work did you do? What was your business?

DYKE:

Oh, sort of Jack-of-all-trades. I've been nearly everything, I guess - except a success.

GIRL:

Do you like books?

DYKE:

Books?

GIRL:

Yes - books - to read.

DYKE:

I don't read when there's anything better to do. I've read a lot here.

GIRL:

(GROWING CONFUSED) I - I hope you don't mind me asking so many questions?

DYKE:

No, go ahead - if it'll relieve your mind any.

GIRL:

Did you ever want to be an actor? Or were you ever?

DYKE:

No -- never.

GIRL:

(HELPLESSLY) Do you - do you know any poetry?

DYKE:

Not to speak of.

GIRL:

(SOFTLY, INTENSE) "Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face, Else would a maiden blush be paint my cheek, For that which - (STOPS, THEN FALTERINGLY) Don't you know what that is?

DYKE:

No. But to tell the truth, it sounds sort of silly to me. Doesn't it to you?

GIRL:

(TEASING HIM AGAIN) "Good night, good night, parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be morrow."....

DYKE:

(PUZZLED AMUSEMENT) Huh?

GIRL:

(PLEADING) What comes next?

DYKE:

Good Lord, I don't know.

GIRL:

(FORLORN) No -- you're not Joe, are you? I -- I had to come and find out though. Mother had to know.

DYKE:

I'm surprised she sent a girl like you on a sorry errand like this, instead of....

GIRL:

She's very sick.

DYKE:

Oh.... That's too bad.

GIRL:

Most of it's from worrying about Joe.

DYKE:

Still -- she'll be glad to know he's not a murderer, won't she?

GIRL:

Yes, I think so. Only --

DYKE:

Only what?

GIRL:

I don't think she'll ever be really well again, till she finds out for certain where Joe is and what's become of him.

DYKE:

Mothers shouldn't be treated like that. I wish I'd treated mine better..By the way, you didn't tell me what your name is...

GIRL:

Josephine Paris.

DYKE:

(THOUGHTFUL) Paris? That's an unusual name. I've heard it somewhere, too....

GIRL:

Just like the name of the city in France.

DYKE:

(THINKING) And your brother's name was Joseph, huh?

GIRL:

Yes, they used to call us Joe and Josie. That's funny, isn't it?

DYKE:

(THOUGHTFUL) No, I don't think it's so very funny. I sort of like it....(FROWNING) If I could only --

GIRL:

What's the matter? You're frowning so......

DYKE:

I'm trying to remember...Now what on earth was that boy's....(SUDDENLY) Wait a minute! Don't tell me! Wait a minute -- I've got it. (SLOWLY..TRIUMPHANTLY) Joseph - Anthony - Paris.

GIRL:

(AMAZED) Why, that's his name! That's Joe! How did you ever -- ?

DYKE:

(FAST, URGENT) Now listen, carefully -- and don't interrupt, because we've only got a minute and I want you to get this all straight so you can tell your mother... It was in France, you see? The early part of the war. I was with the Canadians. It was that morning we staged the raid on Dieppe. We were on our way back to the beach, and this officer was wounded....The Jerries were putting down some heavy stuff, and this lieutenant was lying there right in the middle of it.... Well, all of a sudden, a young fellow broke out of the trees where we were getting some cover and went out in the open after that officer. The chances were about a million to one against him, and he must have known it. Still he reached the lieutenant, picked him up, and started back. But they'd only gone a few yards when an eighty-eight landed right on top of the two of them. Afterward, we got what was left. The identification tag was still there.....and that was the name....Joseph Anthony Paris..

GIRL:

(OVERCOME) Oh!.....

DYKE:

Yeah, you can tell your mother he died like a brave man and a soldier -- in France.

GIRL:

(TREMULOUS) Joe -- my brother Joe - is dead?

DYKE:

He died a hero. One of those wonderful brave things that went almost unnoticed. If an officer had seen it....there'd have been a decoration for your mother to keep and remember him by.

GIRL:

(WONDERING) And you were there and saw it?

DYKE:

I was there and saw it. (GENTLY) It ought to make your mother happy to know her boy died as a soldier -- not as a criminal.

GIRL: (TRANSFIGURED) Yes - oh yes, it will!

DYKE: And does it make you happy, too?

GIRL:

Yes - so happy - after what we were both afraid of, I can't even cry yet.

DYKE:

(GENTLY) Go ahead....go ahead and cry if you want....

GIRL:

(CRYING SOFTLY) I -- I -- It's strange, I almost feel as though I'm crying for you too.

DYKE:

Oh, no - you mustn't ever do that! I'm not fit to be mentioned in the same breath with a boy like your brother..(PAUSE) Now I'm afraid it's time for you to go.

GIRL:

(PROTESTING) But --

DYKE:

(QUICKLY) I'm sorry. You'd better...I'm glad you came before it was too late.

GIRL:

You've done more for me and mother than I can possibly tell you. And - I'm so sorry for you -- so truly sorry. I - I wish I could only do something to make you a tiny bit happier, too. Is there anything I could do?

DYKE:

(ALMOST WISTFUL) Well - yes...there is. Only --

GIRL:

What is it?

DYKE:

Nothing. Forget it. I shouldn't even be thinking about it.

GIRL:

Please tell me. I want you to. For -- for Joe's sake. Tell me what I can do.

DYKE:

(LOW, DESOLATE) Well - in all the months I've been in this rotten place, you're the first girl I've seen....I -- I've been pretty lonesome - and tonight especially .... and if you really want to do something for me...for your brother's sake -- seeing I haven't any sister of my own, or anybody else to say goodbye to me -- I mean, if you could really say goodbye --

GIRL:

(LOW, TREMULOUS) If -- if you want to kiss me -- you can....(A PAUSE, SOFTLY) I'll always say that was for Joe -- and you.

DYKE:

(HUSKILY) Thanks. Goodbye.

GIRL:

(NEAR TEARS) Good night. Goodbye. I - I --

DYKE:

(QUICKLY) What's the matter?

GIRL:

I was - I was thinking what I used to say to my brother -- for good night. (ALMOST BREAKS) If I only could have said it to him just once more....for goodbye.

DYKE:

What was it?

GIRL:

I - I told it to you once and you said it was silly.

DYKE:

(SOFTLY) Say it again...(MUSIC: SNEAKS IN VERY FAINTLY)

GIRL:

(SHAKILY) Good night, good night, parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be -- (SOBS SUDDENLY) .... Goodbye...(FADING) God bless you... (DOOR OPENS, CLOSES.....OFF)

DYKE:

(AFTER A PAUSE....A WHISPER) Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast; Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest....(DOOR OPENS..........OFF)

WARDEN:

(SLIGHTLY OFF) All right Dyke...It's time.

DYKE:

(IN A FAR-OFF VOICE) 'Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come....

WARDEN:

(ON MIKE, GENTLY) Dyke..... I'm sorry.....

DYKE:

'Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once.'

CHAPLAIN:

(QUIETLY) My son.....

DYKE:

(LOW, STEADY) All right..Let's go.

(THROUGH BALANCE OF SCENE VOICES GRADUALLY MOVE OFF MIKE AS MUSIC BUILDS SLOWLY TO CURTAIN)

CHAPLAIN:

I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills......

DYKE:

The valiant never taste of death but once.....

CHAPLAIN:

From whence cometh my help..

DYKE:

The valiant never taste of death but once.

CHAPLAIN:

My help cometh from the Lord which made heaven and earth....

DYKE:

The valiant never taste of death but once.

MUSIC:

(REACHES TRIUMPHANT NOTE .... FOR CURTAIN)

(APPLAUSE)

ROY:

Our stars Jeanne Crain, Gregory Peck and Edward Arnold will return to the Camel Screen Guild microphone in just a moment.....

CHANDLER:

More doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette, according to a nationwide survey.

ROY:

Three leading independent research organizations asked one hundred thirteen thousand, five hundred and ninety-seven doctors what cigarette they smoked. The brand named most was Camel! Try a Camel! See if Camel's choice tobaccos, properly aged and expertly blended, don't bring you new smoking enjoyment! Yes, try a Camel in your "T-Zone"...T for Taste and T for Throat...your true proving ground for any cigarette. See the delighted way your taste responds to Camel's rich, full flavor. See how your throat reports on Camel's cool, cool, mildness.

MUSIC:

(TAG)

ROY:

Now before we ring our curtain down, a final word of thanks to our stars Gregory Peck, Jeanne Crain, Edward Arnold and Pedro de Cordoba for the story they told so magnificently tonight. Thank you all for a deeply moving half-hour.

PECK:

Well Mike, I've said it before, and I say it again -- every actor and actress in Hollywood counts it a privilege to appear with the Camel Screen Guild Players because we know that the proceeds from this show help support Hollywood's most important benevolence -- The Motion Picture Relief Fund.

ARNOLD:

That's right, Greg -- the Motion Picture Relief Fund and its Country House and Hospital, as we have all heard Mike Roy say so often.

CRAIN:

Mr. Arnold we've also heard Mike say that millions of people enjoy Camels. Well, among those millions are many men in servicemen's hospitals. Each week the makers of Camel Cigarettes send free smokes to these hospitals. Among other hospitals, free Camels are being sent this week to: U.S. A.A.F. Station Hospital, Chanute Field, Illinois...U.S. Naval Hospital, Long Beach, California...and Veteran's Hospital, Fort Custer, Michigan. Happy smoking, fellows. Your free smokes are on their way to you now.

PECK:

And that isn't all -- not by a long shot. The Screen Guild Players have cooked up a real treat for next Monday night. If you want action --

CRAIN:

Romance!

PECK:

Music!

CRAIN:

Intrigue!

ARNOLD:

Then for Heaven's sake don't miss the Camel Screen Guild Show next week. It's Tony Martin, Yvonne de Carlo, Peter Lorre and Marta Toren in "Casbah"

PECK:

That's all, folks - goodnight!

CRAIN & ARNOLD:

Goodnight!

MUSIC:

SHOW THEME

ROY:

"The Valiant" was directed by Bill Lawrence, adapted for radio by Harry Kronman, with music by Wilbur Hatch and was presented through the courtesy of 20th Century-Fox, producers of "The Iron Curtain."

Our thanks also to Robert Middlemass author of the original play.

Gregory Peck can currently be seen in the Alfred Hitchcock production, "The Paradine Case."

Jeanne Crain appeared through the courtesy of 20th Century-Fox.

Edward Arnold will soon be seen in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production "Big City."

Don't forget - next week - Camel Cigarettes present the Screen Guild Players in "Casbah" - starring Yvonne de Carlo, Tony Martin, Peter Lorre and Marta Toren! Be sure to listen!

And listen to Vaughn Monroe - with Colonel Stoopnagle and their guest - Kay Armen - on the air for Camel Cigarettes every Saturday night over most of these CBS stations.

Half the babies born this year in some European cities will die before they reach the age of one. To help save the world's children from starvation, twenty-five long-established private relief agencies have combined for American Overseas Aid with the United Nations Appeal for Children. They need your help. Any contribution you make will help supply essential dried milk and fats to starving children. Make your contribution to your local Crusade for Children headquarters or to the Crusade for Children, New York City.

This is Michael Roy in Hollywood saying goodnight and "Won't you have a Camel?"

THIS IS CBS... THE COLUMBIA BROADCASTING ...SYSTEM.